Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: Music in nature

  1. #1
    Captain of Water Music Ouled Nails's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    447
    Post Thanks / Like

    Music in nature

    I have sampled a lot of it in a remote location and, curiously, Mahler's not it. I get annoyed by all the noise generated, all the themes pushed forth at a stressful pace, all the "sound effects." It clashes with wildlife sounds too much.

    How much does the place you're in influence your taste?

  2. #2
    Admiral of Fugues Contratrombone64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    5,340
    Post Thanks / Like
    Ouled - not entirely sure of what your question is, but I'm thinking you're wondering if us, as composers, are interested in or affected by our natural environment, is that so?
    I'm not an atheist and I don't think I can call myself a pantheist. We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many different languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It does not know how. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn't know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being toward God.
    —Albert Einstein.

  3. #3
    Captain of Water Music Ouled Nails's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    447
    Post Thanks / Like
    As I said, Mahler's symphonies strike me as music best appreciated in one's living room or in a concert hall. Play the same works in a peaceful natural environment and, to me, they become too invasive (like a military invasion!).

    The question, stated differently, is does a particular location or environment, such as on the edge of a quiet lake, affect your appreciation of some composers, styles, even genres? Or are you so immersed in any work that you are totally oblivious to what surrounds you?

  4. #4
    Admiral Honkenwheezenpooferspieler Corno Dolce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Moscow, Russia
    Posts
    10,538
    Post Thanks / Like
    Great question ON,

    When I am in the mountains Mahler's symphonies and Richard Strauss's *Tone Poems* do fit rather nicely with the dramatic surroundings.
    *If a man wants God to hear his prayer quickly, then before he prays for anything else, even his own soul, when he stands and stretches out his hands towards God, he must pray with all his heart for his enemies. Through this action God will hear everything that he asks* -Abba Zeno-

    *Protagoras: "Truth is subjective. What is true for you, and what is true for me, is true for me. Your opinion is true by virtue of its being your opinion."

    *Socrates: "My opinion is: Truth is absolute, not opinion, and that you are in absolute error. Since this is my opinion, then according to your philosophy you must grant that it is true."

    "Improvisational Art": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSxVO3EoCRM

  5. #5
    Captain of Water Music Ouled Nails's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    447
    Post Thanks / Like
    But not that well with the loons.

    There were days, and nature can be interesting this way, when wind would take the center stage except for a couple of hours after sun rise and around sun set. Without wind, the lake became like a mirror, not a single ripple, with the tree line being almost perfectly reflected in the water, like a mirror. The Alpine Symphony, which I had brough along, did not fit in that environment. I know 'cause I tried it, this very year@ Cow bells or not, it was simply too noisy, too boisterous.

    Reaction? Argh, why all that noise? Is it really necessary?

    I don't know where Mahler is best heard but it is not in a windless, totally quiet morning or evening along the shores of a lake. That I can attest to.

  6. #6
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso wljmrbill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Taylors, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    3,070
    Post Thanks / Like
    I somewhat have the opposite feelings. The music tends to place me in an enviroment (by closing the eyes and listening: puts me into an imaginary place without being in a set place). I was always taught to feel the music as well as play it. This may explain my feelings when I listen to music also.
    ....To play only what is written is the domain of science. To realize what is not written is the domain of art."
    - Jean Langlais

    I wish you the Best for each day, now and always.

    Bill

  7. #7
    Chief assistant to the assistant chief JHC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Nu Zeln
    Posts
    4,956
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quite honestly (if I am grasping the question correctly) I find any music intrusive if I am in the country trying to be at one with nature, so to speak.

  8. #8
    Recruit, Pianissimo
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    It basically depends on my mood which i am listening to.yes but i cant stay without music.

  9. #9
    Captain of Water Music Montefalco's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    396
    Post Thanks / Like
    Interesting question, ON.
    For music that really suits the environment, I think it's hard to beat Sculthorpe (at least in Australia, anyway). His music seems to be written to 'accompany' (for want of a better word) Australian landscapes/climates, which makes it ideal to listen to when out walking in remote areas.

  10. #10
    Admiral of Fugues Contratrombone64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    5,340
    Post Thanks / Like
    yeah, Sculthorpe was rather like Vivaldi: they both wrote the same music over and over and over.
    I'm not an atheist and I don't think I can call myself a pantheist. We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many different languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It does not know how. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn't know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being toward God.
    —Albert Einstein.

  11. #11
    Chief assistant to the assistant chief JHC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Nu Zeln
    Posts
    4,956
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    3
    It is beyond my understanding why anyone would go into the beautiful isolation of the countryside and want to listen to anything that would detract from this peaceful environment.
    Music (classical) is best heard at the original volume ‘as near as possible’ to hear a symphony at the level of a whisper is just plain pointless.
    Also, I live in a beautiful quite area and get so annoyed when some idiot arrives in a car, winds the windows down and turns the volume way up to listen to his/her music.

  12. #12
    Captain of Water Music Montefalco's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    396
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Contratrombone64 View Post
    yeah, Sculthorpe was rather like Vivaldi: they both wrote the same music over and over and over.
    What do you mean 'was', Sculthorpe is still very much alive!
    If someone writes the same music over and over, that just means that if you like one thing by that composer, then you'll like everything else they wrote.

  13. #13
    Admiral Maestoso marval's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    8,210
    Post Thanks / Like
    I am with Colin on this, not sure I would want to have music when I have all of nature to listen to. Also as with Bill, listening to music takes me to places, depending on the music as to where it takes me.


    Margaret

  14. #14
    Captain of Water Music Ouled Nails's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    447
    Post Thanks / Like
    It's a question of how much time one spends in nature, no? Say you spend fifteen days, same location, no one around. Are you going to always listen to the birds, the wind, every minute of the day? And why not find a musical match for that beautiful sun about to set? You've got an hour before it gets dark, what will it be? Just start the camp fire early?!!

    No. There's a time for classical music in nature. I cannot conceive of any prolonged stay without it.

  15. #15
    Captain of Water Music Ouled Nails's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    447
    Post Thanks / Like
    Oh, and there's that time of the day, around 3 pm, when everything is set for whatever you want and you've got nothing more to do. You see the hammock, four feet away from the lake, and it looks inviting. You settle in with a cloudless sky for panorama, and enjoy the rest. Hummm, where's my CD player?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Modern popular songs based on classical music.
    By jason in forum Fusion & Crossover Music Forum
    Replies: 54
    Last Post: Sep-11-2017, 18:14
  2. ASCAP's Mafia-Like Control Over The Music Industry
    By manoffiji in forum General Music Debate Forum
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: Jan-23-2012, 03:35
  3. Replies: 11
    Last Post: Dec-14-2008, 00:51
  4. artificial music intelligence .......
    By hitsware in forum Community Center and Chat Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Jul-16-2004, 07:36

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •