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Thread: Uncomfortable pedalling problem.

  1. #16
    Lieutenant Commander, Concertmaster FinnViking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soubasse View Post
    That's one handsome console there Finn. Church or home? Real or toaster?
    That's where I work. Another view here: http://www.hakanpaa.net/mhindex.html
    and here more details on the organ: http://www.hakanpaa.net/mikaelinurut.htm

    And there is a slide show in my youtube-video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JA6ANJkiKbQ

    Just wondering why this adjustable pedal board is not more known as it should not be a great trick to build them nowadays.
    Last edited by FinnViking; Jul-24-2010 at 13:35.

  2. #17
    Recruit, Pianissimo
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    Hi! I am a short aspiring organist. I bought an expensive church organ for home only to find that the bench is too high. How do I know how much to have the carpenter cut off of the bench legs?

  3. #18
    Admiral of Fugues Contratrombone64's Avatar
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    rpmkym

    Commonsense tells me that only you can answer that question, yes?
    I'm not an atheist and I don't think I can call myself a pantheist. We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many different languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It does not know how. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn't know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being toward God.
    —Albert Einstein.

  4. #19
    Commodore con Forza Soubasse's Avatar
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    Finn, I've just had another look at those links you provided above (they didn't work for me the first time) and is that a "rollschweller" I see above the pedalboard? If so, I'd be curious to know what they're like to use - have only ever read about them. I always wondered when playing Reger how the hell one was supposed to execute a trill in octaves on the pedals AND a crescendo at the same time until I'd heard about those.
    Music is made to transform the states of the soul, for an hour or an instant (J. Alain)

  5. #20
    Seaman, Mezzoforte
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    Greetings to all the wonderful Organist.please is there any instructional video on pedalling for beginner organist. Since you can read all the books on pedalling and still place your feet wrongly thanks

  6. #21
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    Hi Ekpes,

    There are a few YT videos on this subject. One such is here:



    The other "tip" I can give is: Practice, practice, practice, practice ... and then ... practice again. Looking is okay, but I was taught not to. My organ tutor placed a towel between my waist and over the lowest manual so that I could not even peek. I found my way, but still look for proper note placement at the beginning of a piece.

  7. #22
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso wljmrbill's Avatar
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    Agree. I remember my piano days too when I started and she placed a cardboard above the keys so I could not see the notes and I was only 5..
    ....To play only what is written is the domain of science. To realize what is not written is the domain of art."
    - Jean Langlais

    I wish you the Best for each day, now and always.

    Bill

  8. #23
    Seaman, Mezzoforte
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    Hello sir thanks for the video.As a virtuoso organist which book on pedal techniques will you recommend for a beginner organist,because I know that you have come across so many books and exercises on organ pedal .

  9. #24
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso wljmrbill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ekpes View Post
    Hello sir thanks for the video.As a virtuoso organist which book on pedal techniques will you recommend for a beginner organist,because I know that you have come across so many books and exercises on organ pedal .
    To Quote Lars:

    The John Stainer Method book will be of great help to you ... another one, called the Gleason Method of Organ Playing is also an excellent guide,
    ....To play only what is written is the domain of science. To realize what is not written is the domain of art."
    - Jean Langlais

    I wish you the Best for each day, now and always.

    Bill

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  11. #25
    Seaman, Mezzoforte
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    Thanks am grateful

  12. #26
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    To add, the Gleason book can get a bit pricey (last saw it on a site at $163 (USD)). I have the old 4th edition - paid five bucks for it way back in 1961; still have the book and refer to it from time to time, especially when I start to feel that my pedal work is getting sloppy.

    The Stainer method book is lots less (saw it at $14 USD) in paperback form. Also available for Kindle.

    The two methods (Gleason vs Stainer) take different approaches to learning the pedaling techniques. But the result is basically the same - the feet are able to find all the right notes, hopefully.

  13. #27
    Rear Admiral Appassionata John Watt's Avatar
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    This is a very interesting thread, I'm learning a lot.
    Becoming organistic with my electric guitar playing is where I'm at.
    Only I've got prototype, Roland Boss half-rack micro-digital effects,
    programmable and adjustable, instead of the natural acoustics of a room.

    Imagine a no rate, no speed or phasing sound from an echo, just endless sustain.
    When you play over it, it fades into the background as you keep playing,
    layering multiples of chords and riffs and sounds.
    Trying to play the wah-wah, or twist distortion effects with my feet,
    takes me out of this sonic zone, a new head space I'm working on.
    The latest front page video by Frederik Magle is very informative,
    especially when he hits those lower notes, like a geyser erupting.
    And just when he starts getting into some high notes,
    looking like they're disappointing him, he starts to reach for controls,
    and the video stops.
    Teaser!

  14. #28
    Commander, Assistant Conductor Albert's Avatar
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    The method I learned with in Germany was Ernst Kaller's Orgelschule - In German, English and French. Two books. Book one starts of with pedal exercises. A bit less heel than some of the other methods, but playing flat 30's is somewhat different than an AGO/RCO/RCCO 32 concave and radiating. I wore the seat of a pair of pants out because of the sliding from side to side on the bench to reach. That was on a BDO (concave parallel) 30 note pedal board. I still do practice touch ups after 50 years with the first few pages when I find my pedaling getting sloppy.

    To the original poster, I notice that you purchased a pedal board and had a bench made. Can you lift the pedalboard up a bit to reach more easily? I have played overly short benches by putting wood under each side to lift the bench about 2.5 cm (1 inch)

  15. #29
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albert View Post
    . . . I have played overly short benches by putting wood under each side to lift the bench about 2.5 cm (1 inch)
    Glad I'm not the only one who uses blocks. I play at a church twice each year where the organ bench height was trimmed about 4 inches below what is considered the standard bench height. I carry blocks with me when I have to play that organ.

    I use 3/4 inch blocks at my own church where I play every week. The next organ console will have a crank to adjust the bench.

  16. #30
    Captain of Water Music
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    Precious few organ benches are the right height and adjustable benches are scarcer than hens' teeth so I always go armed with blocks when I deputise!

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