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Thread: Help in Identifying

  1. #1
    Apprentice, Piano
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    Help in Identifying

    Hi, I am not very musical but I appreciate good music :-)

    Yesterday I was pottering in my kitchen with the tv on and there was a programme in where a guy was talking about churches and cathedrals (I think he may have presented programmes about historical battles on other occasions - he has rather a monotonous voice).

    Anyway, he introduced a wonderful piece on a cathedral organ which I recognised as having heard many times. The difference this time was that he was describing when the pedals were being used and to notice the change in pipe sound as the sound opened up. This really made me sit up and listen and all the hairs on the back of my neck stood up at the wonderful sound.

    Now I really want to listen to the entire piece of music - but I don't know what it is.

    It sounds as though it could be suitable for a wedding recessional but it's not mendelsohn. Nor is it flight of the bumble bee or phantom of the opera (all suggestions I've already had).

    Since I can't sing, I downloaded a midi maker program and attempted to create a few bars of the music. My husband and mother both recognised it but they don't know what it is.

    I'd really appreciate if anyone here could help. I'm sure it isn't exact, but it might be just enough for someone to recognise it and put me out of my misery!

    ETA - the first bit actually repeats before changing key and there's a lot of very fast notes which run along with it - it's very upbeat and rousing. TIA.

  2. #2
    Rear Admiral Appassionata
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    Widor Toccata from Symphony no 5

    You'll find a good recording of Christopher Herrick Playing it here.

    http://www.herrick.musician.org.uk/audio.htm

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEB View Post
    Widor Toccata from Symphony no 5

    You'll find a good recording of Christopher Herrick Playing it here.

    http://www.herrick.musician.org.uk/audio.htm
    Thank you so MUCH! Yes that's it! I'm so happy. This is wonderful.

    I'm doing the happy dance.

  4. #4
    Rear Admiral Appassionata
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    No Problem. incidentally, it is often used for wedding recessionals, and was played by Timothy Farrell in 1972? as the recessional for Princess Anne's wedding in Westminster Abbey. Following that for quite a while, everyone else wanted it instead of the standard Mendelssohn Wedding March.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEB View Post
    No Problem. incidentally, it is often used for wedding recessionals, and was played by Timothy Farrell in 1972? as the recessional for Princess Anne's wedding in Westminster Abbey. Following that for quite a while, everyone else wanted it instead of the standard Mendelssohn Wedding March.
    I'm so thrilled about this. My niece was in town today and I called her and asked her to get me a recording - which she did from COventry Catheral.

    Since then, I've found this on YouTube:-

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvIh8Ao6bSQ

    ...which really shows the use of the pedals to open the pipes (is that right?). It sounds like there is more than one person playing!

    It sounds as if it should be a wedding recessional :-)

  6. #6
    Captain of Water Music Thomas Dressler's Avatar
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    Yes, it is a thrilling piece, isn't it? I get people asking me to play it as a postlude at Mass from time to time, and they love it when I do.

    Well, the keys and pedals don't exactly "open the pipes" but they do open a little door UNDER the pipes called a "pallet," which allows the air (which is pressurized in a box the pipes sit on) into the bottom of the pipes, or their "feet."

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Dressler View Post
    Yes, it is a thrilling piece, isn't it? I get people asking me to play it as a postlude at Mass from time to time, and they love it when I do.

    Well, the keys and pedals don't exactly "open the pipes" but they do open a little door UNDER the pipes called a "pallet," which allows the air (which is pressurized in a box the pipes sit on) into the bottom of the pipes, or their "feet."
    I've been so thrilled with this piece of music that I now have THREE recordings of it! The first one I got was a bit fast for my liking. I really like the Christopher Herrick one but the quality of my pc speakers doesn't do it justice. I also like the Pierre Pincemaille one, but again the quality of the audio could be better. So yesterday I bought another two recordings of it from HMV.

    Thanks for the explanation about the pipes. I'm a teacher and it just occurred to me that a colleague plays the organ at the local cathedral so I'm going to ask him nicely if he'd give me a tour of the organ (and who knows - maybe a recital!).

    This may seem like a really daft question - but bear in mind I'm completely ignorant of these matters! Do these organs work from electricity? If so, don't some of them pre-date electricity? I'm curious about how they would work. I've seen organs with pedals for pumping air.

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