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Thread: Names of the Notes in Different Languages

  1. #16
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso Mat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by methodistgirl View Post
    allergo means fast
    judy tooley
    That is correct, Judy. But it is not an answer to my question, I believe...


    Humbly,
    Mat
    Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent.
    -- Victor Hugo


  2. #17
    Admiral of Fugues Contratrombone64's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat View Post
    Hi

    I've got a question. Because in Poland we use capital letters to write major keys (for example F major or F-dur) and small letters for minor keys (f minor or f-moll). I'd like to know how it is in other countries? Is it the same way? Or the size of the letter is just not important??
    Mat ... we do sometimes see F for major and f for minor, in fact I use this nomenclature myself, whether it's "kosher" to Australian ways I'm not sure!

    We also, like the British and New Zealanders say quaver, semiquaver, minim et cetera ...

  3. #18
    Midshipman, Forte
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    Hello, Mat!

    In the United States, some people use upper and lower case letters for major and minor, some people always use upper case letters.

    Hello, Contratrombone!

    Here in Korea, the note values are called by fractions, just as they are in the United States, but translated into Korean, of course.

  4. #19
    Captain of Water Music C5Says's Avatar
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    we use 'do re mi fa so la ti do' and use 'C D E F G A B' when playing guitar or if it's chording a piano.

    in rondalla (a group of stringed instruments), oftentimes the do re mi is used as opposed to reading the score so the way flats and sharps are written are as follows:

    flat:
    ra me se le te

    sharp:
    di ri fi si li
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  5. #20
    Captain of Water Music jvhldb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat View Post
    Hi

    I've got a question. Because in Poland we use capital letters to write major keys (for example F major or F-dur) and small letters for minor keys (f minor or f-moll). I'd like to know how it is in other countries? Is it the same way? Or the size of the letter is just not important??
    In South Africa we use capital letters for major keys and lower case for minor keys. We also use only one notatio system, C D E .....

    Does anybody know where I can get a translation of the values of notes. I'm used to half note, whole note etc. My theory classes are in Afrikaans where we use these values, but I was informed this week that I'm doing the Royal School theory exams in May, in English, and they sometimes reffer to note values as quavers, brevets?? or something like that.
    Johan van Heerden

  6. #21
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso Mat's Avatar
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    Thank you for all your responses.

    Johan,

    This article from Wikipedia may be of help for you. I'll let you know if I find something better.
    Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent.
    -- Victor Hugo


  7. #22
    Captain of Water Music jvhldb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat View Post
    Thank you for all your responses.

    Johan,

    This article from Wikipedia may be of help for you. I'll let you know if I find something better.
    Thanks very much, this exactly what I needed.
    Johan van Heerden

  8. #23
    Lieutenant Commander, Concertmaster Izabella's Avatar
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    as I can see in Croatia is the same as in Poland although we use the so called absolute (do re mi fa so la si do ) and relative (do,re mi fa so la ti do)solmisation
    Izabella

  9. #24
    Lieutenant Commander, Concertmaster Serassi1836's Avatar
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    Latin names of notes were invented by Guido d'Arezzo in XI century, using a hymn where the first verse started with C, the second with D and the seventh with B

    Ut queant laxis
    Resonare fibris
    Mira gestorum
    Famuli tuorum
    Solve polluti
    Labii reatum
    Sancte Ioannes

    The starting syllables of these verses gave the name at their notes: ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la. Si (B) was introducted later, and it was taken with the initials of Sancte Ioannes (it was a hymn for St. John) In XVI century ut became do.

  10. #25
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    Very interesting information, Serassi1836,

    Although I've heard of "Guido", I never knew the complete story that you have explained so well above.

    Thank You
    Last edited by Krummhorn; Apr-07-2008 at 06:21. Reason: 2900
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  11. #26
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso rojo's Avatar
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    Well, we know why 'Ut' was changed to 'Do', don't we?...

    Because you can't sing '''Ut', a deer, a female deer...''




    (Hey, I had to use that smilie; 'ut' is written right next to it in the smilie list. )
    ''Music, I feel, should be emotional first and intellectual second.'' - Maurice Ravel
    ''The greatest education in the world is watching the masters at work.'' - Michael Jackson


  12. #27
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    ROFL, Rojo ... very good there ...

    Now that stupid song is going through my head and I can't get rid of "ut" ...
    Kh ~~.
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    Amateur musicians practice until they get it right ...
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    fessional musicians practice until they can't get it wrong ...


  13. #28
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso rojo's Avatar
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    Haha!

    Sorry Kh; I know what that's like. You get a song stuck in your head, and you can't get it 'ut'.
    ''Music, I feel, should be emotional first and intellectual second.'' - Maurice Ravel
    ''The greatest education in the world is watching the masters at work.'' - Michael Jackson


  14. #29
    Midshipman, Forte
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    Maybe you can drive it out with this song:

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v5.../doremi001.jpg

    The words mean:

    Do do do do, acorn tree,
    Re re re re, the color of a lemon,
    Mi mi mi mi, going down on a slide,
    Fa fa fa fa, the wings of a bluebird,
    So so so so, picking up a pinecone,
    La la la la, the petals of a lilac,
    Ti ti ti ti, the sound of a brook,
    Do ti la so fa mi re do mi so do.

  15. #30
    Admiral of Fugues Contratrombone64's Avatar
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    another bottomless pit of usless knowledge joins the MIMF team (thank goodness)

    Quote Originally Posted by Serassi1836 View Post
    Latin names of notes were invented by Guido d'Arezzo in XI century, using a hymn where the first verse started with C, the second with D and the seventh with B

    Ut queant laxis
    Resonare fibris
    Mira gestorum
    Famuli tuorum
    Solve polluti
    Labii reatum
    Sancte Ioannes

    The starting syllables of these verses gave the name at their notes: ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la. Si (B) was introducted later, and it was taken with the initials of Sancte Ioannes (it was a hymn for St. John) In XVI century ut became do.

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