Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 30

Thread: Names of the Notes in Different Languages

  1. #1
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso rojo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    3,213
    Post Thanks / Like

    Names of the Notes in Different Languages

    Besides standard musical notation, it might be nice to communicate musically with others around the world, so I thought it might be fun to compile a list of the names of the notes in different languages. Here are the names of the notes in English, French, Italian, Spanish and German-

    http://www.library.yale.edu/catalogi...ic/keylang.htm

    and here is information on the names of the swaras (notes) used in Indian music-

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swara

    Anyone want to provide the names of the notes in any other language/s? Or a link to a site with the names of notes in other languages?
    ''Music, I feel, should be emotional first and intellectual second.'' - Maurice Ravel
    ''The greatest education in the world is watching the masters at work.'' - Michael Jackson


  2. #2
    Captain of Water Music Art Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    498
    Post Thanks / Like
    In Dutch, we use the French majeur/mineur and the German -is/-es. For the separate notse, we use the German system, but B flat is Bes and B is B (there is no H in Dutch notes).

  3. #3
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso rojo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    3,213
    Post Thanks / Like
    Thanks for that, Art Rock.

    Funny, it seems in Western music, there are two major note-naming systems-

    1. syllables- Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Si -used by French, Spanish and Italian folk,

    and

    2. letters of the alphabet- C D E F G A B -used by English, German (except for the H business) and Dutch folk.

    Here in Canada, the French use Do Re Mi, and the English use C D E. So I use both all the time. And now English people sometimes learn Do Re Mi and French people sometimes learn C D E, depending on their schooling.

    I'm off to look for the origins of these systems...
    ''Music, I feel, should be emotional first and intellectual second.'' - Maurice Ravel
    ''The greatest education in the world is watching the masters at work.'' - Michael Jackson


  4. #4
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso rojo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    3,213
    Post Thanks / Like
    ''Music, I feel, should be emotional first and intellectual second.'' - Maurice Ravel
    ''The greatest education in the world is watching the masters at work.'' - Michael Jackson


  5. #5
    Recruit, Pianissimo
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Thumbs up Name of the notes in different languages

    This is quiet an interesting topic i have gone through! Well these notes in different languages will be of great help to us. Thanks for this contribution!

  6. #6
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso Mat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    3,600
    Post Thanks / Like
    In Poland we use both Do, Re, Mi and C, D, E,. We use dur/moll and -es/-is. B is in polish H (C, D, E, F, G, A, H, C) and B-flat is B.

  7. #7
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso methodistgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Madisonville,Ky.42431
    Posts
    4,411
    Post Thanks / Like

    italia

    Ever heard of staccato notes? You know the ones with dots underneath
    them. I noticed that Beethoven's 9th is full of them and not to mention
    piano fortie that means to be soft and allergo which means fast.

    judy tooley

  8. #8
    Recruit, Pianissimo
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    In Spain we use do re mi...but we also study the notes in English and German which I think is better 'cause many times it's very useful.

  9. #9
    Commander, Assistant Conductor Violinschlüssel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Genoa, Italy
    Posts
    161
    Post Thanks / Like
    I guess that this differentiation could depend on the origins of the languages where these systems are used. I mean, in Spanish, French and Italian (my mother tongue), which are all Neo-Latin languages, syllables are used.
    On the contrary, in German, English, Dutch, etc. - all Germanic languages - the letters of the alphabet are used.
    This is something that has always made me think (maybe, also because I am a linguist. ).
    Anyway, very interesting topic!

  10. #10
    Ensign, Principal Simon Jansfort's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kolding, Denmark
    Posts
    56
    Post Thanks / Like
    Anybody know a good source for other musically related words to be translated?
    Like ...
    Bar, part, score, punctuation ... and here I'm already missing a few in English. But the language I'm most interested in is Spanish, cause I might have to teaach music there within the year :-)

    Simon
    http://www.jansfort.com - A work in progress.
    http://blog.jansfort.com - my blog. Quite new.
    Both in danish

  11. #11
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso rojo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    3,213
    Post Thanks / Like
    Not off-hand, but if I find anything good, I'll post it.
    ''Music, I feel, should be emotional first and intellectual second.'' - Maurice Ravel
    ''The greatest education in the world is watching the masters at work.'' - Michael Jackson


  12. #12
    Commander, Assistant Conductor Violinschlüssel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Genoa, Italy
    Posts
    161
    Post Thanks / Like
    I know this online translation dictionary:
    http://www.logosdictionary.org
    Give it a try: it may turn out helpful.

  13. #13
    Midshipman, Forte
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    41
    Post Thanks / Like
    Here in South Korea, it's a mess.
    Sometimes, they borrow A B C from the Germanic people.
    Sometimes, they borrow do re mi from Guido.
    (Only they don't have an L, so la becomes ra.)
    Sometimes, they substitute A B C with the Korean alphabet, which goes "ga na da ra ma ba sa."
    That means that ra could be A under the Guido system or F under the Korean alphabet system.

  14. #14
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso Mat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    3,600
    Post Thanks / Like
    Hi

    I've got a question. Because in Poland we use capital letters to write major keys (for example F major or F-dur) and small letters for minor keys (f minor or f-moll). I'd like to know how it is in other countries? Is it the same way? Or the size of the letter is just not important??
    Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent.
    -- Victor Hugo


  15. #15
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso methodistgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Madisonville,Ky.42431
    Posts
    4,411
    Post Thanks / Like
    allergo means fast
    judy tooley

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. languages
    By rojo in forum Open Debate Forum
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Nov-30-2007, 18:30
  2. Notes for Bach partita 1013 piano
    By Close to the Edge in forum Classical Music Forum
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Oct-05-2007, 15:50
  3. Real names as user names
    By Torsten Brandes in forum Help, Troubleshooting & Site Feedback
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Nov-02-2006, 20:15
  4. notes
    By rayan in forum Pipe Organ Forum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Mar-20-2006, 20:58

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •