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Thread: All booked up

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    Commodore con Forza Sybarite's Avatar
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    All booked up

    It seems we haven't got somewhere to discuss what we're reading – so I thought I'd start a thread.

    I've recently finished reading Martin Cruz Smith's Gorky Park. A thriller set predominantly in Moscow in the 1970s, it features the debut of Arkady Renko, a Soviet investigator, who finds himself landed with three corpses , all of whom have had their faces and fingertips removed to prevent identification. Yet even the KGB don't want to touch the case.

    Very well written and a great sense of atmosphere – you can almost taste the vodka – it also manages to be genuinely chilling.

    I'm now reading the first of John Mortimer's books about his much-loved barrister, Rumpole of the Bailey, a character imortalised on British TV by Leo McKern.

    I never really saw the TV programme and I've never read the books before – but they're very, very funny, in a very dry English way.

    So what are other members reading or have read recently? Would you recommend something or was it dismal?
    Last edited by Sybarite; Nov-16-2007 at 16:51.

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    Commodore con Forza Sybarite's Avatar
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    Breakfast at Tiffany's by Truman Capote.

    Beautifully written novella about Holly Golightly, a young and enigmatic woman who becomes friends with a writer who lives in the same block.

    Holly is naive and worldly wise, vulnarable and fragile, yet outrageous and promiscuous, a liar/fantasist with a past that is, at best, hazy. In many ways, it's possible to see Capote's creation as very similar to Sally Bowles in Christoper Isherwood's Goodbye to Berlin – not least as both stories are written from a first-person perspective, about would-be writers, and both authors were gay.


    What are other members reading?

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    Vice Admiral Virtuoso rojo's Avatar
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    Hi Sybarite,

    Great topic! Unfortunately I haven't been reading much these days; mostly just pages of sheet music. (Oh, and the posts around here.)

    I've got a copy of Daniel J. Levitin's ''This Is Your Brain On Music, The Science Of A Human Obsession'' that I look forward to reading, when I get the time.
    ''Music, I feel, should be emotional first and intellectual second.'' - Maurice Ravel
    ''The greatest education in the world is watching the masters at work.'' - Michael Jackson


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    Admiral Honkenwheezenpooferspieler Corno Dolce's Avatar
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    Hi Ms. RoJo,

    That sounds like an interesting book. Christmas break is soon upon us - hopefully I can *visually ingest* it then.

    Cheers,

    Corno Dolce
    *If a man wants God to hear his prayer quickly, then before he prays for anything else, even his own soul, when he stands and stretches out his hands towards God, he must pray with all his heart for his enemies. Through this action God will hear everything that he asks* -Abba Zeno-

    *Protagoras: "Truth is subjective. What is true for you, and what is true for me, is true for me. Your opinion is true by virtue of its being your opinion."

    *Socrates: "My opinion is: Truth is absolute, not opinion, and that you are in absolute error. Since this is my opinion, then according to your philosophy you must grant that it is true."

    "Improvisational Art": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSxVO3EoCRM

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    Admiral Maestoso marval's Avatar
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    Hi

    Am in the middle of reading The Rainbow by DH Lawrence, it is quite good. I mostly prefer classics, it gives me a good read plus a little history thrown in. Get most of my reads from the library.

    As they say
    Outside of a dog man's best friend is a book, inside of a dog too dark to read

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    Commodore con Forza Sybarite's Avatar
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    Hi Rojo, thank you for the comments. I was doing a course earlier this year and, for a number of reasons, gave it up. One of those was that it cut my leisure reading time to nothing – and that was something that I really missed.

    Quote Originally Posted by marval View Post
    ... As they say
    Outside of a dog man's best friend is a book, inside of a dog too dark to read

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    Vice Admiral Virtuoso methodistgirl's Avatar
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    I was reading the 2008 Guiness book of world records and not once was
    a picture of the world's biggest organ or smallest playable musical
    instrument. There was the biggest bug in the world, the fattest, the
    skinnest, the one who could break the most concrete blocks and more.
    As popular as Bejeweled and bejeweled 2 was it should have went into
    the record book. So go figure! I saw the guy and gal with the longest
    fingernails, and the biggest escargo or snail. This book even glowed in
    the dark. I wonder if you ever read Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy.
    I find the series to be quite humorus.
    judy tooley

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    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rojo View Post
    . . . Daniel J. Levitin's ''This Is Your Brain On Music, The Science Of A Human Obsession'' that I look forward to reading, when I get the time.
    Small world, Rojo ... I'm currently reading this same book. It's easy reading and enjoyable. I'll not reveal any of its contents here so as to not spoil your reading adventures. Oddly enough, I was able to borrow this book from our local library - I didn't think they would have the title ... surprise, surprise ..
    Kh ~~.
    Administrator


    Amateur musicians practice until they get it right ...
    Pro
    fessional musicians practice until they can't get it wrong ...


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    Vice Admiral Virtuoso rojo's Avatar
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    Ah, some day... soon I hope!

    Sybarite- Well, one can't do everything in life, at least not at the same time...
    ''Music, I feel, should be emotional first and intellectual second.'' - Maurice Ravel
    ''The greatest education in the world is watching the masters at work.'' - Michael Jackson


  10. #10
    Lieutenant, Associate Concertmaster
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krummhorn View Post
    Small world, Rojo ... I'm currently reading this same book. It's easy reading and enjoyable. I'll not reveal any of its contents here so as to not spoil your reading adventures. Oddly enough, I was able to borrow this book from our local library - I didn't think they would have the title ... surprise, surprise ..
    Hmm that book sounds interesting, I will have to check my library, I havent had a chance to go there yet. Maybe look for some good Baroque CD's aswell.

    The last book I tried to read was a book on Franz Liszt, but it was dull. I thought it would be more about his music, but it was mostly about his personal life besides music.

    Rojo and Krummhorn give me some good Classical music book titles and authors.. or anything to do with music in general. You guys seem like you have read quite a few books on those subjects.

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    Vice Admiral Virtuoso Mat's Avatar
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    I've been reading 'Miles Davies Autobiography' recently. I have like 50 pages left.
    Great book, however written in a informal language, if you know what I mean.
    Nevertheless worth to be recommended.

  12. #12
    Rear Admiral Appassionata
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    The last book I read was titled - the book of general ignroance. a light hearted and generally informative read if total trivia is your thing. I just found it amusing...

  13. #13
    Commodore con Forza Sybarite's Avatar
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    Nana by Émile Zola

    Part of the massive Rougon-Macquart cycle, Nana tells the story of a Parisian tart whose meteoric rise destroys several French families. Ending with Nana's death and the start of the Franco-Prussian war, Zola uses the novel as an allegory of the decline of the Second Empire.

    Told in Zola's characteristic naturalistic style, it's a heady and sensual journey, with descriptions that leave you thinking you were there – you can almost smell the greasepaint in the opening chapter's description of Nana's theatrical success that launches her on Paris.

    But Zola is not simplistic – his portrayal of Count Muffat, perhaps Nana's greatest 'victim', is poignant and multi-faceted, but also shot through with a sense that there are great similarities between his overt religiosity and his masochistic relationship with Nana.

    Excellent stuff.

  14. #14
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso rojo's Avatar
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    I thought this one sounded interesting, although I haven't read it.

    Alex Ross, 'The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century'
    ''Music, I feel, should be emotional first and intellectual second.'' - Maurice Ravel
    ''The greatest education in the world is watching the masters at work.'' - Michael Jackson


  15. #15
    Rear Admiral Appassionata Muza's Avatar
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    What a great thread!!! Sybarite, the Gorky Park sounds great - I will be sure to read it, as soon as I get my hands on it.
    I havent read a lot of thoughtful books lately (mostly suspense/murder investigation books to relax on my way home), but I have reread Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 - It is amazing. Simply amazing - soo much food for thought and deliberation.
    Why waste money on psychotherapy when you can listen to the B Minor Mass? ~Michael Torke

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