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Thread: Stephen Tharp plays Mulet "Tu Es Petra"

  1. #1
    Commander, Assistant Conductor mathetes1963's Avatar
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    Stephen Tharp plays Mulet "Tu Es Petra"

    Absolutely jaw-dropping!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVwQZttmkko

    But why call it Tu Es PETRUS?
    “The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.”
    -Johann Sebastian Bach, 1685-1750

    "It Don't Mean A Thing If It Ain't Got That Swing."
    -Duke Ellington, 1899-1974

  2. #2
    Commodore con Forza
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    The question should rather be: why did Mulet write
    Tu es petra et portæ inferi non prævalebunt adversus te.
    as opposed to the usual version:
    Tu es Petrus, et super hanc petram ædificabo Ecclesiam meam et portæ inferi non prævalebunt adversum eam.
    which is often translated as "You are Peter, and on this rock I will build my Church, and the gates of hell will not prevail against it."

    So Mulet's version translates as "You are the rock, and the gates of hell will not prevail against you." Note that Mulet's work is dedicated to the Sacré-Cœur church of Montmartre (the title Esquisses byzantines referring to that church's supposed architectural style), and I have already read in several places that Mulet modified the latin text to reflect the idea that the rock is the hill of Montmartre.

    (As for Stephen Tharp's video clip, I have already commented on it here.)

  3. #3
    Commander, Assistant Conductor mathetes1963's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by acc View Post
    The question should rather be: why did Mulet write
    as opposed to the usual version:
    which is often translated as "You are Peter, and on this rock I will build my Church, and the gates of hell will not prevail against it."

    So Mulet's version translates as "You are the rock, and the gates of hell will not prevail against you." Note that Mulet's work is dedicated to the Sacré-Cœur church of Montmartre (the title Esquisses byzantines referring to that church's supposed architectural style), and I have already read in several places that Mulet modified the latin text to reflect the idea that the rock is the hill of Montmartre.

    (As for Stephen Tharp's video clip, I have already commented on it here.)
    Been away a few days acc, thanks for the heads-up.
    “The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.”
    -Johann Sebastian Bach, 1685-1750

    "It Don't Mean A Thing If It Ain't Got That Swing."
    -Duke Ellington, 1899-1974

  4. #4
    Recruit, Pianissimo
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    I'm not an expert in Latin, so I don't really notice things like that. All I know is that this is a great piece of music, and Mr. Tharp has done an excellent job. -
    -ChurchWhistles

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChurchWhistles View Post
    I'm not an expert in Latin,
    Neither am I. But if you have a little bit of curiosity to start with, it's amazing how far Google can take you these days.

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    I majored in Spanish and had enough Latin to get past a few impediments. Petrus = Peter, and petra = rock (piedra in Spanish). Hope that clears up translation.

    Gloria in excelsis Deo, et in terram pax hominibus bonae voluntatis.

    The "tu es Petra" is inscribed around the dome of St. Peter's in Rome.

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    As long as we're on languages, such things as "cases" and "declensions" are a lot of the reason Latin eased off into the "romance" languages (French, Italian, Spanish , Portuguese, and a smattering of Romanian).

    The reason it's "super hanc petram" is because "super" ("above" or "on") is one of the prepositions that required the accusative case. Other prepositions required the ablative case.

    German also has "cases", which are modifications (endings) on nouns or adjectives depending on the use in the sentence. Aus, auser, bei, mit, nach, zeit, von, and zu are known as the "dative" prepositions, meaning that they require the "dative" case (indirect object, usually).

    With cases, nominative = subject, genitive = possessive, accusative = direct object, and dative = indirect object. Latin also had "ablative" and "vocative". German settled for just the four.
    Last edited by dll927; May-01-2009 at 18:05.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dll927 View Post
    The "tu es Petra" is inscribed around the dome of St. Peter's in Rome.
    There it actually says "Tu es Petrus"; see http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3162/...0a43eefc97.jpg:



    On the other hand, I recall somebody mentioning to me that there is a "Tu es petra" inscription in the Sacré-Cœur in Paris. I'll definitely have to check that on my next trip there.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by acc View Post
    On the other hand, I recall somebody mentioning to me that there is a "Tu es petra" inscription in the Sacré-Cœur in Paris. I'll definitely have to check that on my next trip there.
    Meanwhile, I've managed to take the time to visit the Sacré-Cœur during a trip to Paris: I haven't seen a "Tu es petra" inscription anywhere. So maybe it's Mulet's own idea...

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    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mathetes1963 View Post
    Absolutely jaw-dropping!
    Absolutely ... a stunning performance and impeccably played with great ease by this masterful organist.

    He makes playing this piece look far too easy - I know it's not as I actually tried a couple of times. Must be the organ - - just doesn't sound the same on only 9 ranks.

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  11. #11
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso methodistgirl's Avatar
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    That is good. The only Latin piece I know is "Pie' Jesu'". I loved the
    organ piece though.
    judy tooley

  12. #12
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    Judy ... surely you've heard of Panis Angelicus? Ave Maria?
    You probably know more Latin titles that you might think ...
    Kh ~~.
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    Amateur musicians practice until they get it right ...
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