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Thread: Unusual Jazz Instruments

  1. #16
    Chief assistant to the assistant chief JHC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat View Post
    I don't expect you to like it, Colin, but I think I should point out that there aren't many recordings of him on the Net available to be linked to, and I know the one I posted is not the best. I'll send you more details via PM.
    A friend who used to play Oboe in the Auckland Philharmonia years ago said it is the worst instrument to hear beginners practising on, it takes so long to develop an even, steady tone. I do like the English Horn I think that may sound better for Jazz but I have not heard it in that genre. he also pointed out that with the Oboe you use so little breath you gasp for air, so it must be very difficult in long passages.
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  2. #17
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso Mat's Avatar
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    Colin, it's true - oboe beginners are a torture to hear. It is very difficult to produce a decent sound, compared to other woodwind instruments. But once you learn it, you can really play beautifully. Also true that after you've played a phrase, you always get an "air surplus" left in your lungs that you can't use. Most annoying feeling (saying that from my own experience). As to long passages, it doesn't always have to be difficult. I should mention that circular breathing can be a big help.

    There are some jazz English Horn players. Here's a short clip of already mentioned Jean.
    Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent.
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  3. #18
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    I have heard of circular breathing when I was studying Flute, but never did master the technique. for some reason I cant get your link to work I think my firewall is blocking it.
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  4. #19
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso Mat's Avatar
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    Can't you unblock it? Don't worry, it's not a virus.
    Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent.
    -- Victor Hugo


  5. #20
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    No can't unblock all I get is an incomplete file
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  6. #21
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    Tuba in Jazz.( Derived from Wiki)

    The tuba has been used in jazz the genre's inception. In the earliest years, bands often used a tuba for outdoor playing and a double bass for indoor performances. In this context, the tuba was sometimes called "brass bass", as opposed to the double bass, which was called "string bass"; it was not uncommon for players to double on both instruments.
    When used in modern jazz, tubas usually fill the traditional bass role, although it is not uncommon for them to take solos. New Orleans style Brass Bands like Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Rebirth brass Band, and Nightcrawlers Brass Band feature a sousaphone as the bass instrument. Miles Davis made use of a tuba, played by Bill Barber, in his album Birth of the Cool, released in June, 1950. One of the most prominent tubists specializing in jazz is the New York City-based Marcus Rojas, who has performed frequently with bandleader Henry Threadgill. Another notable group is the Modern Jazz Tuba Project, founded by R. Winston Morris, which consists entirely of tubas and euphoniums with rhythm section.
    The tuba has also played a large role in ragtime music and in big band music.

  7. #22
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    Bassoon in Jazz (Derived from Wiki).

    The bassoon is infrequently used as a jazz instrument and rarely seen in a jazz ensemble. It first began appearing in the 1920s, including specific calls for its use in Paul Whiteman's group, the unusual Octets of Alec Wilder, and a few other session appearances. The next few decades saw the instrument used only sporadically, as symphonic jazz fell out of favor, but the 1960s saw artists such as Yusef Lateef and Chick Corea incorporate bassoon into their recordings; Lateef's diverse and eclectic instrumentation saw the bassoon as a natural addition, while Corea employed the bassoon in combination with flautist Hubert Laws.
    More recently, Illinois Jacquet , Ray Pizzi, Frank Tiberi, and Marshall Allen doubled on bassoon in addition to their saxophone performances. Bassoonist Karen Borca, a performer of free jazz, is one of the few jazz musicians to play only bassoon; Michael Rabinowitz, the Spanish bassoonist Javier Abad, and James Lassen, an American resident in Bergen, Norway, are others. Katherine Young plays the bassoon in the ensembles of Anthony Braxton>.
    Lindsay Cooper, Paul Hanson, the Brazilian bassoonist Alexandre Silverio, and Daniel Smith are also currently using the bassoon in jazz. French bassoonists Jean-Jacques Decreux and Alexandre Ouzounoff have both recorded jazz, exploiting the flexibility of the Buffet system instrument to good effect.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by OLDUDE View Post
    Tuba in Jazz.( Derived from Wiki)

    The tuba has been used in jazz the genre's inception. In the earliest years, bands often used a tuba for outdoor playing and a double bass for indoor performances. In this context, the tuba was sometimes called "brass bass", as opposed to the double bass, which was called "string bass
    As in funeral processions "When the saints go marching in"
    The tuba has also played a large role in ragtime music and in big band music.
    It gave way to Double bass early on in "Big band music" I find the Double bass is the best for really punching a rhythm whereas the Tuba is rather Brass Band kind of thing
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  9. #24
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    I think that in this thread, my object is to point out the unusual instruments which have been utilised within the Jazz genre . (Not particularly whether they merit such inclusion)

  10. #25
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    Aw shucks I'm in the poo again
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  11. #26
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    Sorry Colin,
    No criticism intended - as I think most people realise (including yourself),
    I'm only trying to stimulate interest in the Jazz forum.
    But is it working?
    Will this section survive without more contributions?

    Without more response I dont think I will want to continue myself.

  12. #27
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso Mat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OLDUDE View Post
    Will this section survive without more contributions?

    Without more response I dont think I will want to continue myself.
    Do continue, John. Would also be nice if you could provide us with some samples. Now, here's my contribution.

    The second jazz oboe player I found is Paul McCandless. This man is a true multi-instrumentalist. Not only does he play oboe, but also English horn, soprano saxophone, sopranino saxophone, bass clarinet and a variety of folk flutes. He is the leader of a group called Oregon.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAcGuRSVvMA (love the way he explores oboe's highest registers)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHnwrwy200g

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_C2uL5aV6Q

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEKsMsaMLuY
    Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent.
    -- Victor Hugo


  13. #28
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    Mat, with all due respects to me this is not jazz, they have the dots????
    admittedly this is rhythmic music but jazz ? please do not be offended. Colin
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  14. #29
    Admiral Honkenwheezenpooferspieler Corno Dolce's Avatar
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    The other evening I heard an artist playing Jazz Standards on the Heckelphone accompanied by a Piano and Double Bass - A most pleasing combo.
    *If a man wants God to hear his prayer quickly, then before he prays for anything else, even his own soul, when he stands and stretches out his hands towards God, he must pray with all his heart for his enemies. Through this action God will hear everything that he asks* -Abba Zeno-

    *Protagoras: "Truth is subjective. What is true for you, and what is true for me, is true for me. Your opinion is true by virtue of its being your opinion."

    *Socrates: "My opinion is: Truth is absolute, not opinion, and that you are in absolute error. Since this is my opinion, then according to your philosophy you must grant that it is true."

    "Improvisational Art": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSxVO3EoCRM

  15. #30
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    Hi CD I would love to have heard that. Here follows info from Wiki on the instrument, (Note that the blue bits are not links)

    The Heckelphone is a double reed instrument of the oboe family, but with a wider bore and hence a heavier and more penetrating tone. It is pitched an octave below the oboe and furnished with an additional semitone taking its range down to A.[1] It was intended to provide a broad oboe-like sound in the middle register of the swollen orchestrations of the turn of the twentieth century. In the orchestral repertoire it is generally used as the bass of an oboe section incorporating the oboe and the cor anglais (English horn), filling the gap between the oboes and bassoons.
    The Heckelphone is approximately four feet in length, and is quite heavy: it rests on the floor, supported by a short metal peg attached to the underside of its bulbous bell. An alternate second bell, called a "muting" bell, is also available, which serves to muffle the instrument for playing in a small ensemble. This arrangement is unique among double-reed instruments. It is played with a large double reed that more closely resembles a bassoon reed than an oboe reed.
    Smaller piccolo- and terz-Heckelphones were developed, pitched respectively in (high) F and Eb, but few were made, and they remain very rare.

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