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Thread: Old, Popular & Classical

  1. #1
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    Old, Popular & Classical

    Hi there - I remember the vogue for grooving up classical pieces in the 1960s. I must admit, now that I'm grown up/older/old, I find them a bit cringeworthy.

    What do you lot think?

    Here's one I remember, not with unalloyed pleasure -


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    Or this one



    Tune is from Amilcare Ponchielli's Dance of the Hours

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    Quote Originally Posted by Taggart View Post
    Or this one



    Tune is from Amilcare Ponchielli's Dance of the Hours
    Aha! I always wondered! Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Watt View Post
    I wish I could join this show of embedded videos,
    but not only have I never been able to get it together to upload like this,
    I couldn't find the album cover for the first "grooving up" music I thought of,
    and that's "Switched on Bach" by Walter Carlos.
    That's the album that made me hear more Bach than anywhere else in my life.
    It sounded hot, the way it was produced for modern stereos.
    So hot, in fact, I bought "The Four Seasons" by Walter Carlos, having an incredible rain storm.

    Now, listening to what one man can do with synthesizers, the music sounds insipid.
    That's not putting down Walters' accomplishments,
    but he can't compare to an actual symphony or concert organist.
    This perception of mine also took a beating, when Walter had a sex change to become Wendy.
    People and musicians were down on synthesizers, seeing them as reducing gigs for musicians,
    and creating a form of artificial music. Yes, that all came true with American digital productions.
    It took me until this year, 2018, to make YouTube videos of myself playing an electric guitar.

    Working in show-bands and hearing disco music during the disco era,
    there were lots of classical and retro songs done over with a disco beat.
    And then songs were done over with a raggae rhythm.
    And then samples of songs were used to put together computer music.
    And then self-producing musicians used previous songs as generic templates.

    If Ella Beck can use the word cringeworthy, I think that overall, she's being shy.
    I think she's still got the hair from her "new wave" days, and is too self-conscious.
    Hey! If you were a groupie for "A Flock of Seagulls", that's cool. I did one of their songs.

    Wow! I really looked on YouTube for the "Switched on Bach" album cover, not finding it.
    I couldn't find a video for the "A Flock of Seagulls" song I used to do.
    I wasn't hot on the name "Trouble Clef", but the band did very well.
    We thought of ourselves as being in the "new wave" era, this song-list being from 1984.
    We did pop songs with funk and jammed them up, having different sounds for different songs.
    This song-list was was when I had a drummer and bass player, just a trio,
    but we pulled off all these songs and had interest from a major booking agency.
    I was an artist and sign-painter in Port Colborne during the day, and didn't want to leave.
    The drummer came from a country band that just won a Juno award,
    and he and the bassist had stars in their eyes, after my star wanted to stay.

    aaaaah! The feeling I got changing channels on my Redmere Soloist amp,
    and starting a lead guitar solo with the howling of the wolves, by Duran Duran.
    yeah... that's true, what made it new wave era for me,
    people applauding me when I went to change channels on my footswitch.
    Do I feel a little foolish about that, considering that amp cost $2,750, custom made in Scotland?
    Not at all. And on the drives home I didn't have the radio on, looking for peace and quiet.
    I also wired a switch into my dashboard lights so I could turn them off and see outside.
    It's beautiful here in the Niagara Peninsula, especially along Lake Erie.

    That's me in the middle, 32, the drummer and bassist being 21 and 19.
    I still do "Maneater", "Message in a Bottle" and "Roxanne", new millennium style.
    I just hafta add, David Bowies' guitarist used a Redmere Soloist for "Let's Dance".
    I liked sounding the same, but I never experimented with my sexuality.


    Attachment 4223Attachment 4224

    There doesn't seem to be a lot that's relevant here, seeing as I'm not sure how your guitar performances have anything to do with classical themes used as pop music in the twentieth century, but thanks for the Walter Carlos reference.

    Please don't make personal remarks about me, however. Thank you.
    Last edited by Ella Beck; Oct-09-2018 at 11:57.
    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

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    In the 1960s in the UK, classical music was part of the landscape because of Lord Reith's influence on the BBC, and so Hamlet Cigars were able to use Bach's Air on a G String as a comic device in their infamous TV advertisements.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIckHmwZAeI
    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Taggart View Post
    Or this one



    Tune is from Amilcare Ponchielli's Dance of the Hours



    Always enjoyed that Taggart. Love every bit of it!


    No I don't want this to scare ya , but my bunk maid has malaria !

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    Quote Originally Posted by elderpiano View Post
    Always enjoyed that Taggart. Love every bit of it!


    No I don't want this to scare ya , but my bunk maid has malaria !
    Hurray, hurray - thank you for posting on my thread.

    I like this one too - especially the way he changes his mind at the end and says, 'Mudder - fader - please disregard this letter.'
    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

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    A Whiter S
    hade of Pale - oh, didn't we think we were cool when that came out?

    It certainly sounds classical - but exactly how is still debatable, judging by this quotation:


    Capturing the hippy vibe of the Summer of Love to a tee and complete with its floaty Hammond organ intro, Procol Harum’s 1967 classic is surely the most famous pop song to have borrowed from classical music. Exactly which bit of JS Bach it is derived from, however, is not as clear as one might think. Yes, there are elements of the Air on a G String in the ground bass there, but that famous intro is actually a canny adaptation of JSB’s ‘Ich steh mit einem Fuß im Grabe’, BWV156.

    (See
    http://www.classical-music.com/article/six-best-pop-songs-inspired-classical-music)
    Last edited by Ella Beck; Oct-11-2018 at 08:59.
    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

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    Beach Boys - Lady Linda


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    The above is based on Bach's Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring.

    Try this:



    Clue- shaken not stirred.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taggart View Post

    Clue- shaken not stirred.
    Cor - that's a bit cryptic. Was there a composer called James Bond?
    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

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    This must go down as one of the cheekiest rip-offs of classical music in a song which is - well, a bit more downmarket!

    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

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    Simon & Garfunkel

    The best music due ever to happen to America!

    All time favourites.




    Last edited by elderpiano; Oct-14-2018 at 14:43.

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    The Golden age of America - Love them!




  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by elderpiano View Post
    The best music due ever to happen to America!

    All time favourites.




    Bridge Over Troubled Water is one of my favourite songs - very much of my era. When I went to university and was in a hall of residence, the girl next door played it over and over on her record player. Good job I liked it!
    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

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