Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Best Motivation for the Older Player

  1. #1
    Commodore con Forza
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Great Britain
    Posts
    625

    Best Motivation for the Older Player

    I played the violin in childhood, then gave up for 40 years.

    I've been playing for six years now - I still have fortnightly lessons, but there's a possibility that we'll be moving to another town in the next year.

    What's the best way to keep motivated? Find another teacher? Join an amateur orchestra? Try to find other individuals and form a small hobby ensemble? Or just enjoy solo playing for what it is and live in the moment.

    Any advice, anyone?

  2. #2
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso John Watt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Welland, Ontario, Canada, mid Niagara Peninsula, between Great Lakes Erie and Ontario
    Posts
    3,375
    Oh no! You had to ask, and post a new thread in this forum. Thank you.

    According to the American Federation of Musicians Union,
    people who take lessons as a child usually give up playing.
    If you pick up an instrument as a late teen or early twenties,
    you usually keep playing and can become a professional.
    All children are born singing and dancing, and most lose it by the age of five.

    You are very lucky to be getting into it with a violin.
    You can carry an inexpensive one around very easily to play it outside or take it anywhere.
    Even if I'm against excess electrical use and technology that takes jobs away from humans,
    I like to put live concert DVDs up on my big screen TV and jam along with them.
    Even just having a record or CD that's something you can jam along with, is very nice.
    I did that with jazz albums when I was a teenager.

    I think it's called Eggslist in England, an online site with a section where musicians reach out.
    It's called Gumtree in Scotland.
    I know I have a big bar band and show-band background, sitting backstage with all kinds of entertainers,
    but if you advertised that you were tired of sleeping alone with your violin,
    you'd get a lot more replies. I might even think of getting a cello to back you up.
    Yeah! Those four piece modern chamber ensembles, two violins, cello and bass,
    might be the best for a violinist to jam along with.

    You could just start walking around your neighbourhood playing away,
    and see what musical dog starts following you home.
    If you move to London, you could hang around one of those public pianos.
    Actually, doing everything you said would be the best way to find other players you like,
    and then try to make them like you.
    I had a nice violin as a teen, but it wasn't left-handed.
    I wound small copper wire around the neck for frets, but it didn't sound good.

  3. #3
    Commodore con Forza
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Great Britain
    Posts
    625
    Quote Originally Posted by John Watt View Post
    Oh no! You had to ask, and post a new thread in this forum. Thank you.

    According to the American Federation of Musicians Union,
    people who take lessons as a child usually give up playing.
    If you pick up an instrument as a late teen or early twenties,
    you usually keep playing and can become a professional.
    All children are born singing and dancing, and most lose it by the age of five.

    You are very lucky to be getting into it with a violin.
    You can carry an inexpensive one around very easily to play it outside or take it anywhere.
    Even if I'm against excess electrical use and technology that takes jobs away from humans,
    I like to put live concert DVDs up on my big screen TV and jam along with them.
    Even just having a record or CD that's something you can jam along with, is very nice.
    I did that with jazz albums when I was a teenager.

    I think it's called Eggslist in England, an online site with a section where musicians reach out.
    It's called Gumtree in Scotland.
    I know I have a big bar band and show-band background, sitting backstage with all kinds of entertainers,
    but if you advertised that you were tired of sleeping alone with your violin,
    you'd get a lot more replies. I might even think of getting a cello to back you up.
    Yeah! Those four piece modern chamber ensembles, two violins, cello and bass,
    might be the best for a violinist to jam along with.

    You could just start walking around your neighbourhood playing away,
    and see what musical dog starts following you home.
    If you move to London, you could hang around one of those public pianos.
    Actually, doing everything you said would be the best way to find other players you like,
    and then try to make them like you.
    I had a nice violin as a teen, but it wasn't left-handed.
    I wound small copper wire around the neck for frets, but it didn't sound good.

    Thanks. I don't think hanging round a public piano in London trying to pick up stray musicians would be a good idea for a lone woman, however.
    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

  4. #4
    Commodore con Forza
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Great Britain
    Posts
    625
    Off to an early morning music lesson, though for how much longer with this teacher, I know not.

    One good way to motivate older players is to attend music course holidays. In November this year we'll be off (for the second time) to Halsway Manor in Somerset for their short course entitled 'Playing Music for Dancing'. We had a super time last year and are looking forward to it.
    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

  5. #5
    Commodore con Forza
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Great Britain
    Posts
    625
    Halsway Manor is a lovely place and the food is good too. Its only downside is being 300 miles away from where I live!

    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

  6. #6
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso John Watt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Welland, Ontario, Canada, mid Niagara Peninsula, between Great Lakes Erie and Ontario
    Posts
    3,375
    oh... oh... I'm having glorious music course holiday thoughts... beautific thoughts...
    I'm even thinking the Antiques Roadshow would be set up, appraising instruments and recordings.

    That has to be better than Niagara Peninsula musicians having to go to one of the Falls casinos,
    to see American acts getting paid on those big stages.
    The Province of Ontario built them, but hired a Chicago company to manage them.

    Actually, now putting down a cup of Earl Grey tea to type with both hands... as if I drink tea,
    hanging around the Shaw Festival in Niagara-on-the-Lake is the closest thing to a music course holiday,
    seeing all those over-talented and too good-looking song and dance people hanging out, singing and playing.

    I hope you can post some photos.

    Musical dogs nipping at my heels are called "cutting sessions" by island players.
    Other guitarists can jam and try to out-play me, to replace me, but I've never been cut.
    When the band hired me they described this island tradition, and told me not to worry.
    That also includes Buffalo and Toronto gang members with their favorite guitarist,
    coming in to the club and displaying weapons. They got hustled out in a hurry.
    Here's a photo of me with Drastik Measures, in St. Catharines, in the Palmgrove, a nightclub they owned.
    They won the Toronto Caribana Best Parade Band Prize their first year in Canada.

    Don't worry about Angelo Mosca, a famous Canadian football player and wrestler.
    I was sitting beside him at a wedding in St. Catharines.

    I'm working on a song I call "My Sunset Destiny". Here's a Reebs' Bay, Port Colborne photo.


    Best Motivation for the Older Player-23-jpgBest Motivation for the Older Player-243-jpg

  7. #7
    Commodore con Forza
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Great Britain
    Posts
    625
    Well, we had a great music lesson today - me on fiddle, my husband on English concertina, and my fiddle teacher as our accompanist on keyboard.

    We had thought maybe to call it a day seeing as we're trying to move anyway, but in the event, I'm going to see Fiddle Guru next week for a solo fiddle lesson - I'll be playing some of the 'Golden Age' Scottish fiddle tunes I've been learning by ear, and some of the Irish sets from The Blue Session Book.
    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

  8. #8
    Lieutenant Commander, Concertmaster
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    100
    Well if you need a motivation, you are someone close to Jim Hendricks, or just bored to do this. All in all, this is a problem anyway, no matter you think you aim you dream or think you would never do this - it's a problem.
    And the first step to get rid of your problems - UNDER ANY CONDITIONS, stop comparing yourself with somebody else. Sure you have to teach from the mighty, but that is a lesson, not a continuous jump into becoming just like the teacher.
    Next is a place. As for now, you are way too old and skillful to listen to the others, yet, from time to time you need a place where everybody just like you. I mean like music and can rock your balls out with it.
    And the last but not least, is motivation. All of this is a motivation, but the most powerful is you yourself.
    That is actually it)

  9. #9
    Commodore con Forza
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Great Britain
    Posts
    625
    Quote Originally Posted by AlderonFrederic View Post
    Well if you need a motivation, you are someone close to Jim Hendricks, or just bored to do this. All in all, this is a problem anyway, no matter you think you aim you dream or think you would never do this - it's a problem.
    And the first step to get rid of your problems - UNDER ANY CONDITIONS, stop comparing yourself with somebody else. Sure you have to teach from the mighty, but that is a lesson, not a continuous jump into becoming just like the teacher.
    Next is a place. As for now, you are way too old and skillful to listen to the others, yet, from time to time you need a place where everybody just like you. I mean like music and can rock your balls out with it.
    And the last but not least, is motivation. All of this is a motivation, but the most powerful is you yourself.
    That is actually it)
    Thanks for posting on my thread, and welcome to MIMF.

    However, I'm not quite clear as to your meaning in the post quoted above - sorry.

    Are you perhaps talking to John Watt, as he's the one who's so keen on Jimi Hendrix?

    But then, he isn't lacking in motivation.
    He seems to be one of the most motivated guitar players I've come across.

    But then, if you were addressing me, neither am I lacking in motivation, actually - I just started the thread to get a discussion going as to what each person finds the most motivating thing.

    With some it may be exams. With some - wanting to be good enough to play at an event or with a band. Others - because they want to be able to play the music they love. The last is basically what motivates me.

    What motivates you, @AlderonFrederick - I'm assuming that you play an instrument, although you may not be an 'older' player?
    Last edited by Ella Beck; Nov-10-2018 at 21:54.
    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

  10. #10
    Commodore con Forza
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Great Britain
    Posts
    625
    I've decided to take a violin exam again - only grade 4, but it's giving me something to work on, some lovely pieces including an early music 'recercada', and a jazz classic, and some new bowing techniques to learn.

    I'll have to take the exam at Easter, in case we do manage to sell the house next year and move away.
    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

  11. #11
    Commodore con Forza
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Great Britain
    Posts
    625
    I had a great lesson yesterday - my teacher seems very keen to tutor me for the exam and even asked me some 'aural test' questions at the end of the lesson. It was fun - though I was alarmed to find that one new requirement for violin exams is that you have to sing a series of notes from a sheet of music, i.e. sing and sight-read. I've never done that before, and at my age it'll be hard to develop a new skill. I might have to plough that part of the exam - still, it's only four marks.

    Mind you, it would be a great skill to develop if I could - so useful for singing new hymns in church!
    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

  12. #12
    Commodore con Forza
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Great Britain
    Posts
    625
    I found this YouTube video which suggests a method for learning to sing from sheet music. I found it helpful.

    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

  13. #13
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    7,996
    Quote Originally Posted by Ella Beck View Post
    . . . What's the best way to keep motivated? Find another teacher? Join an amateur orchestra? Try to find other individuals and form a small hobby ensemble? Or just enjoy solo playing for what it is and live in the moment.

    Any advice, anyone?
    Sometimes the outlook from another teacher can help improve your motivation, but deep down, the motivation has to come from your heart and your soul; for me that is where music originates when I am playing or practicing.

    Try to attend local concerts whenever possible ... and keep up a good regimen of practice times ... that is, on a regular basis, so that you actually look forward to the next practice session. I have been a church organist since 1961 and my practice day at the church has always been Thursday afternoons into the evening hours. I have programmed myself into that weekly mode and seriously and happily look forward with great anticipation going to church to practice on the organ. I can work out fingering/timing at home on the piano.

    In my practice sessions I always begin and end with something that is very familiar and that I can play well. Often times it might be the same piece each week ... but I think the 'key' to a great practice session is to start with something you know ... then work on all the hard stuff ... and before you stop that session, play something you know well and enjoy playing. In that manner you end your practice session on a positive note (no pun intended) and have a good feeling that you did indeed accomplish your goals for that session.

    Make it enjoyable so that you look forward to the next practice session.

  14. #14
    Commodore con Forza
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Great Britain
    Posts
    625
    Quote Originally Posted by Krummhorn View Post
    Sometimes the outlook from another teacher can help improve your motivation, but deep down, the motivation has to come from your heart and your soul; for me that is where music originates when I am playing or practicing.

    Try to attend local concerts whenever possible ... and keep up a good regimen of practice times ... that is, on a regular basis, so that you actually look forward to the next practice session. I have been a church organist since 1961 and my practice day at the church has always been Thursday afternoons into the evening hours. I have programmed myself into that weekly mode and seriously and happily look forward with great anticipation going to church to practice on the organ. I can work out fingering/timing at home on the piano.

    In my practice sessions I always begin and end with something that is very familiar and that I can play well. Often times it might be the same piece each week ... but I think the 'key' to a great practice session is to start with something you know ... then work on all the hard stuff ... and before you stop that session, play something you know well and enjoy playing. In that manner you end your practice session on a positive note (no pun intended) and have a good feeling that you did indeed accomplish your goals for that session.

    Make it enjoyable so that you look forward to the next practice session.
    I think you are right. Enjoying practice is a great idea, though I'm sure sometimes one has to plug away at something that isn't so enjoyable.
    Just being a hobby-player, though, I never think of my violin practice as a chore.
    Carrying a torch for Classical Music...

Similar Threads

  1. Running older software
    By Dorsetmike in forum Music Software & Equipment
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Nov-17-2015, 17:54
  2. New groups that sound like the older ones
    By methodistgirl in forum Community Center and Chat Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Apr-09-2008, 05:38
  3. lack of motivation + ideas
    By The Sky Tunnel Entrance On The Hilltop in forum General Music Debate Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Jun-07-2005, 21:32

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •