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Thread: The effect of modern technology on the audience for classical music.

  1. #1
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    The effect of modern technology on the audience for classical music.

    Is it good or bad?

    Probably a bit of both, depending on how you look at it.

    For me, there's never been a better time to learn about music. There are examples on YouTube of any composer you feel curious about.

    I think the availability of western classical music has also brought it a new global audience.
    'Think before you speak. Read before you think.'

  2. #2
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    But what do you mean by modern technology , Ella ? Do you mean like robots playing the piano sort of thing?

    <br>

    Very limited, no black notes played. Makes me cringe.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by elderpiano View Post
    But what do you mean by modern technology , Ella ? Do you mean like robots playing the piano sort of thing?

    <br>

    Very limited, no black notes played. Makes me cringe.
    No, I just meant things like YouTube and streaming and people being able to share music and post videos of themselves playing fiddle and so on.
    Thanks for the video you posted, though - it's a lot of fun!
    'Think before you speak. Read before you think.'

  4. #4
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso John Watt's Avatar
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    I would say classical music has made a profound impact on this young woman with her new technology.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6rBK0BqL2w

  5. #5
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    One effect of the internet on classical music must be that, as the western classical tradition can now be sampled all over the world, there will be composers of classical music who are influenced by oriental, African or other 'non-western' musics - surely to the enrichment of the tradition?
    'Think before you speak. Read before you think.'

  6. #6
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    This has been a horrible week for me. Part of that has been inside so much,
    watching YouTube videos more than the rest of my entire life combined.
    Now I have seen what Ella Beck is on about here, what is a new phenomena, global music.
    And that's self-produced global music, from government sponsored symphony orchestras to personal creations.

    I'm seeing "surely to the enrichment of the tradition?" with that question mark, something I'll comment about.
    I'd like to start with the beginnings of this audio-video technology, to keep it in perspective.

    When cell phones with audio-video capabilities first came out in New York City,
    people would stand around sending "live captures" of a man raping a woman on the sidewalk.
    That's an under-reported crime, but having a new live global audience necessitated some action.
    New York State passed a law making it a crime to see a crime and not report it.
    Police began monitoring cell phone activity to prosecute individuals who sent such audio-videos.

    This new audio-video activity also created a new social phenomena, "cell-phone sex".
    Partners could be using audio, what you're saying, and video, what you're showing, as a new sexual activity.
    Any discomfort or potential shame was understood as a simple reluctance, or probable paranoia,
    because these signals could be seen by others, live, recorded, or if your device was accessed by another afterwards.
    Those without audio-video capabilities were downgraded as "phone sex" users.
    This technology and social activity is now seen as being part of the "disco era", the "cocaine era",
    when live computer feeds and far more interactive, and larger, devices are now commonplace.

    Making a YouTube video has this "cell phone sex" and "phone sex" quality to the psychology of the human mind.
    It's a very self-absorbing "art form", absorbing as much as you are either willing or capable of showing.
    This very addictive technology has now created a new branding of genres or titles for YouTube viewing totals.
    "the worlds' ten most"... "the biggest"... "the longest"... all compete with the serious self-promotion of many legitimate businesses.
    Video shots that attract interest in viewing but are not seen in the video is now commonplace.
    Video titles with famous names, famous music and famous movie titles that aren't shown in the video are commonplace.
    A big percentage of videos generate comments mostly based on the use of robotic voices or non-robotic voices.

    When all these YouTube videos are simply put together as content for this log-in site,
    the over-all effect is downgrading the legitimate and quality input, definitely not enriching any traditions.
    People who create visuals for existing music should have a directory of their own,
    to name one genre of content.
    Music producers such as symphonies, rock bands, loopers, all categories, should be in their own directory.
    Too much of our time is wasted seeing things that aren't what they look to be, or starting to see them,
    and when you consider how America is attacking and hacking other countries for their resources and wealth,
    to continue propagating this online world wide web, it's more than just a negligent act of global pollution.

    I am haunted by the hour with the YouTube videos I made of myself.
    My justification, and excuse, as I felt compelled to say, was that they were unrehearsed,
    weren't professional, aren't very good, and actually, is me at my worst, not even warmed up.
    I'm not even playing a left-handed guitar and using a tremolo arm.
    The sad nature of my existence this summer created a need in me to feel part of the scene,
    and that's not live music because in this city of over 60,000 people there is no live music.
    I got paid to be a strolling troubadour, an offer from a big business across from City Hall,
    but that was about people, and myself, wanting to make a political statement with me as a candidate.
    That got me going as a performer, and musician, with a beater electric guitar and new tech portable amp.
    That's the only reason I could make a YouTube video, or I wouldn't have had anything to play.

    Here's my bottom line about exposing myself on YouTube.
    I remember what comedians and musicians were saying about television when it first came out.
    They would say they could get on the Ed Sullivan Show, or any day-time or night-time talk show,
    and tell their jokes and play their songs, and all at once everyone in America saw and heard them.
    That killed most of their club and concert gigs, people thinking they saw them already and staying home.
    And staying home meant watching more new stuff on TV, also to the detriment of movie theaters.
    That's what YouTube is, a do-it-and-watch-it-yourself electronic addiction, as polite or profane as it can be.
    Look around you at the products for sale that you buy.
    That's where computer globalization with all it's inherent greed and vanity first was extended, manufacturing for profit.
    Are you going to be happy when, sooner or later, all your music is labeled "made in China"?
    If everyone around the world is using Yamaha, Roland or Godin products, how individual is your sound going to be?
    Everyone is just going to be considered as another viewing from the same screen and speaker source,
    and "likes" and "thumbs up" are going to be the commerce of this music seen and be seen.

    And just for you, Ella Beck, I'm going to add a little twist to your English sobriety,
    and type it's going to come down to "to see or not to see, that is the question".

  7. #7
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    A reminder that the thread is called

    The effect of modern technology on the audience for
    classical music.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~


    Now, to return to relevance and the discussion about classical music -
    Last edited by Ella Beck; Nov-11-2018 at 09:46.
    'Think before you speak. Read before you think.'

  8. #8
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    One thing I haven't mentioned so far - the effect of modern technology has been that people want to band together and share their interests. This leads to music forums. A few years ago I joined Talk Classical, and because of that my knowledge of classical music has expanded. Whenever I want to explore a composer I knew nothing about, I can google and generally find some examples on YouTube.

    And what I can do, everybody else can do.

    The internet is hugely influential and educational as far as classical music is concerned.
    'Think before you speak. Read before you think.'

  9. #9
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    The effect of music forums and people posting classical music on YouTube has been that not only the well-known works of classical music are spreading, but a market is being created for lesser-known works and composers - early music, for example, is probably getting through to more people numerically than ever before. If there's a market, people will record the lesser-known works and a niche market will be created.

    This must be particularly valuable for today's composers of classical music.
    'Think before you speak. Read before you think.'

  10. #10
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    Just to illustrate my remarks, here is a piece of early music about war.
    I dedicate it to the memory of all those who've died in war, and particularly, because today is Remembrance Day and the centenary of the 1918 Armistice, to the hope of peace in the world.

    The Armed Man, the Armed Man is to be feared.

    Last edited by Ella Beck; Nov-11-2018 at 10:05.
    'Think before you speak. Read before you think.'

  11. #11
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    As regards early music, another great boon of the internet is that people taking up historic instruments like the lute can now find sheet music and tablature so much more easily.
    'Think before you speak. Read before you think.'

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