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Thread: Obsolete & Archaic

  1. #16
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    A usage from America that's crept in but would have been considered ungrammatical in the 1960s - outside of the house instead of just 'outside' the house.
    Last edited by Ella Beck; Feb-21-2019 at 21:37.
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  2. #17
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    A usage from Europe that has completely superseded the 1960s usage, though it came in during that decade - the figure 7 written with a bar through it. It still lacks the bar on the typing keyboard, but when people write it, they nearly always cross their 7s. Even I do!
    Last edited by Ella Beck; Feb-21-2019 at 22:49.
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  3. #18
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    One saying that my mother was fond of, but that younger people don't get the point of is 'to fancy one's onions'.

    This means that the person is a bighead who likes to parade his/ her opinions and throw his/her weight about.

    One never hears it nowadays.

    https://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle...-a3686021.html
    There are some more interesting phrases mentioned here. Some are definitely new - 'several sandwiches short of a picnic' comes from the 1980s. When I was young, the now obsolete expression would have been 'eighteen shillings to the pound'.
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  4. #19
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    'Disinterested' - historically, the word means that you don't have self-interest - i.e. you are impartial, rational, unselfish.

    Even in the 1960s, when I was at high school, it was usually used in today's sense of 'uninterested' - but we were aware that it was considered an incorrect usage, and we found the word used in its 'original' sense in authors such as Jane Austen.

    Now nobody much remembers its original meaning, let alone uses it in that sense.
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  5. #20
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    Regarding post #26, above, I have followed the advice given in section 2.3 of MIMF's Terms of Service https://www.magle.dk/music-forums/fa...cies#faq_rules

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Returning to the thread topic:

    'Different than' - an expression I first noticed on Star Trek, and an Americanism, is beginning to find its way into British English.

    https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/usage/different-from-than-or-to

    As this link points out, a more usual expression when I was younger was 'different to' - 'different from' is found in both varieties of English.
    Last edited by Ella Beck; Feb-23-2019 at 19:49.
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  6. #21
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    In the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, even quite 'genteel' people routinely swore. In the nineteenth century through to the 1960s, swearing in public was considered uncouth in middle class society, though it was rife in working class circles.

    Now, though, swearwords have become common in all classes, even among children. And some of the most popular swearwords are the extreme ones, not the milder 'bloody' etc of days gone by.
    Last edited by Ella Beck; Feb-24-2019 at 00:55.
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  7. #22
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    'Ms' has not taken off in the way that one might have expected. In some ways, it has become old hat and women are opting to be called 'Miss' or 'Mrs'. Women who were young when 'Ms' was introduced are now older and therefore 'out of fashion' - that's my explanation for this phenomenon.
    Last edited by Ella Beck; Feb-24-2019 at 10:16.
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  8. #23
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    Words for the toilet have changed. 'Loo' is ubiquitous, whereas it was considered a bit posh when I was a child. 'Toilet' is still used a lot of course, but 'lavatory' has become the new upper class word.
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  9. #24
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    Another usage which has become the usual expression among the young would have been considered ungrammatical when I was young.

    Someone asks how you are - the young person replies, 'I'm good, thanks.' To my ear, he's claiming to be virtuous, because the usage when I was young, and still the 'correct one' in standard British English is - 'I'm well, thank you.'
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  10. #25
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    Facebook often tells me that it's a Friend's Birthday. When I post a message on her timeline, I'll always include 'Many Happy Returns' in my greeting. I'm usually the only one who does, so I suspect that this form of greeting may be on the way out, though still used and known.
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  11. #26
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    Another usage among the younger generation - if you asked someone whether they approved of a choice you'd made, say about the menu, they'd say, when I was young, 'I don't mind.'

    Now they say, 'Okay by me' or 'I'm easy with it.
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  12. #27
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    And instead of saying, 'It's your choice', they say, 'It's your shout.'
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  13. #28
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    The Southern English 'lunch' has replaced the Northern English 'dinner' as the word used for the midday meal.

    On the other hand the Northern English 'tea' for an early evening meal (rather than the afternoon tea and cakes collation) is now spreading to the south.
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  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ella Beck View Post
    Another usage which has become the usual expression among the young would have been considered ungrammatical when I was young.

    Someone asks how you are - the young person replies, 'I'm good, thanks.' To my ear, he's claiming to be virtuous, because the usage when I was young, and still the 'correct one' in standard British English is - 'I'm well, thank you.'
    'I'm good, thanks' is also used nowadays in a pub when someone wants to tell the person offering them to buy the next round of drinks either that they're happy with what's left in their glass, or that they've finished their drink but don't want another one for the time being.
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  15. #30
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    When I was a child, female actors were 'actresses' (still the common usage, but not everywhere), female gods were 'goddesses' (fading a little) and female poets were 'poetesses' (just about gone for good).

    Because of the feminist movement, these feminine endings are seen as diminishing or demeaning. I agree about 'poetesses', but not about the others.
    Last edited by Ella Beck; Mar-02-2019 at 10:00.
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