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Thread: Jimi Hendrix vs. Stevie Ray Vaughan

  1. #16
    Rear Admiral Appassionata (Ret.) intet_at_tabe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rojo View Post
    Sorry intet, I just meant that I understood your explanation.

    Yup; it's a shame that we lost so many so young...


    Cool rojo!!

    "When you play the horses you´re bound to lose sooner or later" regarding drugs and alcohol. The addiction always controle the addict, never the other way around. Now you have a great sunny weekend!!

    Best regards,
    intet-at-tabe

  2. #17
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso rojo's Avatar
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    True; addictions are dangerous.

    About the sunny weekend, I'll certainly try!
    ''Music, I feel, should be emotional first and intellectual second.'' - Maurice Ravel
    ''The greatest education in the world is watching the masters at work.'' - Michael Jackson


  3. #18
    Rear Admiral Appassionata (Ret.) intet_at_tabe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rojo View Post
    True; addictions are dangerous.

    About the sunny weekend, I'll certainly try!
    rojo and everyone else. After a short break, yesterday occipied all day with my lawyer let´s continue the journey from the late 1966, when Jimi Hendrixs suddenly appeared in the Swinging London musical invironment. An outcast from America.

    However before we continue this journey, we have to look at a very important english undergrown group at the time with the name The Yardbirds, where three of England´s most famous guitarists in rock and blues later on went to the 101 class playing the guitar as teenagers. Jeff Beck, Erik Clapton and Jimmy Page are the names.

    The most interesting and well known of these three exquisite guitarists being Eric "slow hand" Clapton, not really an englishman, but born on Jamaica in the Caribean and his brother in blues played on the guitar, his american collegue Duane Allman, from the Allman Brothers band, and one individual male almost 2 meters tall, albino born in the south of America in Texas with the name Johnny Winter.

    You may think that nothing happened in the evolving music department in America, when Elvis Presley, the KING of rock & roll topped the polls musically and throughout a lot of movies, acting a soldier or a beach lion. The KING in America from the early days of rock & roll in the middle of the 1950´s with Jerry Lee Lewis, Bill Haley, in England Tommy Steele from 1955-65 were stars like Paul Anka, Perry Como, Nat King Cole and Frank Sinatra each of them made a huge career in soft jazz with lyrics accompaigned by a Big Band. For instance the Nelson Riddle Orchestra, long time backing for Frank Sinatra and Paul Anka songs, before The Carpenters "Close to You" and "Raindrops keep falling on my hair" from the movie with Robert Redford and Paul Newman were screened. Paul Anka, who actually wrote and composed the song "My Way", which became identical to Frank Sinatra.

    Intermission,
    intet-at-tabe
    Last edited by intet_at_tabe; Jan-24-2008 at 19:19.

  4. #19
    Rear Admiral Appassionata (Ret.) intet_at_tabe's Avatar
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    The Yardbirds was not really a group in the beginning, more like a musican´s kollektive where nothing was planned, and everyone being able to do a few chords on an instrument, were as good as the next guy.

    You have to remember, when The Beatles first appeared in 1962/63 John Lennon and George Harrison could hardly chisel their own guitars. Paul McCartny told this years later on an interview about the early days, when a guitarist only had to be able to play a few 4-5 chords to perform and make a demo on an oldfashioned taperecorder to a musical company.

    Eric Clapton entered the Yardbirds in 1963, at this time his idols were Robert Johnson. Chuck Berry and Little Walter, who all of them had their basis in guitar playing in the american invented - the blues an extended musical art form from the Negro Spirituals, songs sung by African American slaves in the cutten- and suggar plantations in the south of America, long before The United States Of America had it´s birth in 1776, when new americans (former europeans) through out the british, after the french/british war on american soil.

    In 1965 EC, already well known in London, England. He left the Yardbirds to enter Mr. White Blues in Europe, the band John Mayall´s Bluesbreakers. Here mr. Eric Clapton became famous in only one year for his guitarplaying, mostly his solos on older blues songs from americans, composed by his long time friends (today) Mr. B. B. King and John Lee Hooker, both of them black american musicians. Particular on one song called "Have You Ever Loved A Woman" a blues standard which Eric Clapton made his own.

    John Mayall knew listening to EC´s guitar: This guy is going to go the whole way and become the guitarist of an entire generation, which EC did.

    In the US at the same time Duane Allman (el. guitar), a wild young man, whose personal interests were concerned mostly about drugs, beers, guitars and fast bikes and his brother Greg Allman (organ, keyboards) had had their teenage experiences in different groups, before they decided to form The Allman Brothers Band. Blues/Rock musicly often performed by a band with two lead guitarists or two drummers, southenors from the USA. More precisely Nashwille, Tennesee. The equater of the later different directions in music Country and Blue Grass music.

    Duane Allman had the very same talent as Eric Clapton, and the two of them years later formed a group playing against one another, dueling on the guitar soloing as an artform in rock music on George Harrison´s Bangladesh album. An album, the first in the world of it´s kind - To support the hungry people of the Bangladesh. The first aid concert in the world - musically speaking.

    The songs on this album that made both Eric Clapton and Duane Allman famous were Clapton´s song "Layla", (written by Eric Clapton in honor to his Lady at the time, George Harrison´s former girlfriend Patty) and George Harrisons song "While my guitar gently weeps". Some of the best f...... el. guitar I´ve been so lucky to have listened to in my life.

    Unfortunately Duane Allman, intoxicated by boose and drugs died on his bike later on.

    So while Jimi Hendrix, an outcast from the USA, not approved of by his own, so to speak colour, made stardom in the UK and Europe, two other el. guitarsist were leaning on Hendrix.

    A third one quite unknown at the time both in the USA and England at the time i 1967 Johnny Winter from Texas, USA was headding for a huge surprice in the musical blues/rock buisness.

    End of today´s lecture. Best regards,
    intet-at-tabe
    Last edited by intet_at_tabe; Jan-24-2008 at 17:31.

  5. #20
    Lieutenant Commander, Concertmaster drummergirlamie's Avatar
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    Both were overrated, but at least one was an inovator.

  6. #21
    Commodore con Forza
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    i don't understand this "underrated / overrated" thing as well as is hould, i guess. i was not born at the time, but i believe and it seems obvious that jimi was not the only one who could do new, beautiful and interesting things. he wasn't the greatest technician on the instrument either, but as i was trying to say, this has nothing to do with music, as long as it is appreciated. i've always been impressed by jimi's tricks, but what i really love about his playing is the intense involvement, the concentration he gave to obtain magnificent sounds, out of simple blues composition.

    stevie ray vaughan was of course a big jimi hendrix fan and had his own guitarist identity, though tainted with a very americna culture (stetson included!)

    jimi hendrix - born under a bad sign

  7. #22
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    John Watt*

    To me Jimi symbolizes the blues, or maybe just the idea i have of the blues, and he does it in the same way John Lee Hooker, Jimmy Mcgriff, Jimmy Smith, Freddie King or Howlin' Wolf do ( i know... they did, and don't anymore since they're buried six feet deep. uhh, is Jimmy Smith dead?). It is a cliché anyway, because i really don't care about étiquettes.

    It is true that Jimi, even before pairing with Buddy, had this extremely funky approach to what he played. Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding did a wonderful job on building superfunky grooves. Here i'm thinking about one tune in particular: "little miss lover", from "axis...". The intro break is awesome, and i wonder if anyone has ever used it for a hip-hop song. Jimi's use of wah-wah is nice, you can feel how much he gets his kick out of this.

    Man, i wish i had it in my walkman right at the moment i get out of my working place.

  8. #23
    Commodore con Forza
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    the song i was refering to is entitled "little miss lover". i know "belly button window very well", this song makes me feel good, with a strange sensation of comfort. and whoever is on bass, the music moves me.

    your bass-cellos thing makes me think of ramsey lewis ans the guy who recorded with him "sun godess" and "funky serenity", for example. the double-bass goes through a wah wah device and i love this sound. i will call this a "womby" sound.

  9. #24
    Apprentice, Piano Logman's Avatar
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    Lest we forget the great Frank Marino is also a very great guitar player and Hendrix influenced. A side note. JH was in the Army, not the Air Force. He was a paratrooper and injured his knee during a night jump. Honorable Discharge and at first supported the war in Vietnam. Check out Frank Marino and his early band Mahogony Rush.

  10. #25
    Seaman, Mezzoforte CARLTONDRAUGHT's Avatar
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    Both great Guitar masters but i'd say Hendrix just shades Stevie Ray

  11. #26
    Seaman, Mezzoforte
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    I love both guitarsits. But my favorite is definatly Jimi Hendrix

  12. #27
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso methodistgirl's Avatar
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    Believe it or not, Jimi Hendrix was influenced by Churk Berry's
    style of playing during the 50s. Stevie Ray Vaughn was influenced
    by Jimi Hendrix's. There are not many left who are alive except
    Eric Clapton, David Gilmore, Steve Vei, and Joe Satriani.
    judy tooley

  13. #28
    Duckmeister teddy's Avatar
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    Clapton was influenced by Muddy Waters who mentored him.

    teddy

  14. #29
    Spectral Warrior con passion White Knight's Avatar
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    Beautiful, John, right on!
    Whatever floats your boat May your reach always exceed your grasp

  15. #30
    Spectral Warrior con passion White Knight's Avatar
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    John, absolutely spot on!
    Whatever floats your boat May your reach always exceed your grasp

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