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Thread: Jimi Hendrix vs. Stevie Ray Vaughan

  1. #46
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    This page talks all about Johnny's guitars and guitar playing style. The site is the most comprehensive site on Johnny Winter with full discography and calender of every year's concerts.
    http://yeech.altervista.org/winter_guitars.html

    I remember Johnny saying that he never used a tremolo bar and that most guys didn't know how to use it but the one guy who really knew how to use it is Jimi Hendrix.

    Also I remember Johnny didn't like capos and it seemed to me that Johnny felt a capo was sort of a crutch.

  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Watt View Post
    Johnny was more of an acoustic guitarist right from the start, and slide player,
    finding his own tone as a loud guitar player.
    Yeah, Johnny loved acoustic, especially the steel guitar that he said had an edge on it like a garbage can. He also got to where he would play the Earlwine Lazer with the treble all the way up.

  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Watt View Post
    Look what I got today, Florestan, for $!, with the disc looking new.
    This Ibanez is an S.G. copy, also new, what Johnny's playing here,
    so it's all coming together. Too bad you're not here to play bass.
    I took off the right-handed pick-guard, or it would look the same.
    How does this recording rate in your Johnny Winter world?
    He looks really young in the photo.

    Attachment 3806Attachment 3807
    There are some great songs on that Gangster of Love album, it is stuff he kind of didn't want released and his ex manager was a jerk and kept releasing stuff left and right repackaged and I don't think Johnny got a dime for it all, but it is great music. But I would say the last five are absolutely excellent:

    12. Low Down Gal of Mine
    13. Parchman Farm
    14. Leaving Blues
    15. Goin Down Slow
    16. Kind Hearted Woman

    In these last five he sounds like an early bluesman. I think these songs rank as high as any of his finest power blues. Here he really sounds like he is living the blues live. There are many more good ones in these old releases.

  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Watt View Post
    Florestan, I'm going to have to disagree with you.
    This "Gangster of Love" CD really disappointed me. If you're a big Johnny Winter fan, I'm surprised you like it.
    My overall opinion is that it's not even half the guitar playing I'm used to, from his first two Columbia albums.
    The basic production level seems to be mild, New Orleans style Cajun rock, and I really mean mild.
    I can't imagine any song being used as part of anything, from a TV show for children to a movie soundtrack.
    It almost sounds like Johnnys' singing was used, and dubbed over a karaoke cassette, not even a CD.
    One song even sounds like it isn't Johnny playing guitar, just very slow, simple playing, but with a heavy effect,
    maybe doubling the sound, what could be a guitar synthesizer or octave device, sounding like that.
    I think that was track six. Track seven would be the "Unchained Melody" chords, not even blues.

    You and I might even be listening to two different products.
    You've got "Parchman Farm" as 13, but it's 9 for me with only ten songs overall.
    1: Road Runner 2: Gangster of Love 3: The Guy You Left Behind 4: Five After Four AM 5: That's What Love Does
    6: Leave My Woman Alone 7: Oh My Darling 8: Low Down Gal of Mine 9: Parchman Farm 10: Goin' Down Slow

    If you want to talk about having a sense of urgency, no, nothing sounds energetic at all.
    I'll say one thing, it makes me want to hear his first two albums again.
    If this proves anything at all about Johnnys' popularity,
    this is the first used CD of his that I've seen, one of the reasons I got it. I can see why it was donated.
    Long after Johnny seemed to disappear as a big rock star, probably because he just toured live, or hibernated,
    I heard a new song, something about rain falling, for him, more of a pop-rock-blues production,
    but it was a great song, it was the Johnny singing and playing that I knew,
    and it got a lot of FM radio play, and became a song other blues players covered.
    And if god said to Abraham, going and pick me one,
    I'm sure he'd still be looking for Johnnys' version of highway 51.
    It isn't power blues and some of it is poorly produced. Johnny didn't want the guy releasing all this stuff, but it gives you some history, and I still stand by 8: Low Down Gal of Mine 9: Parchman Farm 10: Goin' Down Slow as being excellent renditions as provided on the Gangster of Love album.

    Here is another one from that same era. These are songs where Johnny's voice is as important as the simple guitar accompaniment. He is covering the very old bluesmen. Too bad the You Tube poster put the wrong picture implying power blues and showing an electric guitar when it is acoustic.


    Same song by the great Robert Johnson (I think Johnny did it justice):


    The popularity is strong enough that they recently released a 40 track album with most of this early stuff. It is variable, some great, some cheesy, but all of it worth having for a Johnny Winter freak.
    Last edited by Florestan; May-20-2017 at 04:31.

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Watt View Post
    Whew! I feel like I just got finished making a speech, instead of just introducing the song.
    It doesn't matter that I can't embed, even if I try,
    because there is no video for this 1969 recording of Highway 61 by Johnny Winter.

    I needed some tunes.
    This is the second Johnny Winter album I bought at the time,
    jamming along to learn three chord blues.
    And I would have bet it was highway 51.
    That was one of the better looking double album covers back then.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yclRjptWlW8
    That is a killer song! And a killer rendition.

    I wonder why you can't embed. Maybe your computer is not displaying everything. But there is a list of icons at the top of the editing box. The filmstrip is for embedding videos. You must not have those items showing.

  6. #51
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    I could sure use a bigger house and a room full of shelving to sort things out. I can't even find any of my Neil Young or Eric Clapton CDs. I know there are somewhere, but just can't find them. In a box somewhere.

    Here is a Killer Hendrix Album. Band of Gypsies:
    Last edited by Florestan; May-21-2017 at 07:54.

  7. #52
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    Stevie Ray Vaughan was talented enough, but he was basically a blues musician, I doubt he could be called innovative in the way Hendrix was.

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