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Thread: Easiest Bach pieces? xP

  1. #1
    Lieutenant Commander, Concertmaster SilverLuna's Avatar
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    Easiest Bach pieces? xP

    I know that sounds like an oxymoron, but sreisuoly, what are the easiest Bach organ pieces? Just wondering

    ~Silver
    Last edited by SilverLuna; Aug-31-2009 at 05:47.
    SilverLuna: colorist and effects animator
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    *~I'm a proud organist~*
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    ~Silver

  2. #2
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    Fair enough question deserving of a fair answer

    The standard fare for my 1st year of organ study were the Eight Little Preludes and Fugues (spurious: possibly by J.T. Krebs), BWV 553-560.

    Next for me were the Six Schübler Chorales. BWV 645-650.

    Of course, my studies included more than just Bach. A good amount of Vierne was thrown into the mix, too. I still appreciate Vierne to this day and enjoy playing his compositions.
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  3. #3
    Vice Admiral Virtuoso wljmrbill's Avatar
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    I would agree with Krummhorn and a few of the easier chorales. Jesu,Joy of Mans Desiring is always a good one too. Good Luck with your studies and I hope you have a good tutor/teacher.

  4. #4
    Admiral of Fugues Contratrombone64's Avatar
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    Sorry to be contradictory here BUT I'd hardly class the Schubler Chorales as easy, some of them are moderately playable. I can only, however, support Lars' comments about the 8 little preludes and fugues. However, these are only LITTLE not easy. No Bach organ music is EASY. Sorry to say.
    I'm not an atheist and I don't think I can call myself a pantheist. We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many different languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It does not know how. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn't know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being toward God.
    —Albert Einstein.

  5. #5
    Ensign, Principal
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    SilverLuna,

    I agree with Krummhorn and with the general sentiment that no Bach is easy, but some pieces are easier than others. As an addition, I would recommend the Orgelbuchlein - sorry about the spelling. Quite demanding but short pieces, so they are not impossible to learn, but they take a lifetime to master and are very useful for church work.

  6. #6
    Admiral of Fugues Contratrombone64's Avatar
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    And, if you're interested, I've published a few of the Chorales and other Bach things on this forum, go to here in the Organ Section. They are in PDF format, free to use.
    Last edited by Krummhorn; Sep-01-2009 at 07:11. Reason: added url
    I'm not an atheist and I don't think I can call myself a pantheist. We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many different languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It does not know how. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn't know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being toward God.
    —Albert Einstein.

  7. #7
    Rear Admiral Appassionata greatcyber's Avatar
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    When I first started organ lessons as a kid, I got Bach's Eight Little Preludes and Fugues as my first "real" music. As I recall, the cover read "Easy Bach" and I crossed it out with a big "X" and replaced it with "hard" but in looking back (and again just recently as I found that book while visiting family last month) it's a good place to begin.
    Stephen

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  8. #8
    Commodore con Forza
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    Quote Originally Posted by greatcyber View Post
    When I first started organ lessons as a kid, I got Bach's Eight Little Preludes and Fugues as my first "real" music. As I recall, the cover read "Easy Bach" and I crossed it out with a big "X" and replaced it with "hard" but in looking back (and again just recently as I found that book while visiting family last month) it's a good place to begin.
    They are certainly very rewarding pieces. I can't ever remember hearing a professional organist include them in a recital or a recording, which is a shame. I suppose they are afraid of losing credibility if they play something which is identified so strongly as "learning" material.

  9. #9
    Admiral of Fugues Contratrombone64's Avatar
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    Losing credibility? Perhaps not, aren't you making an assumption based on "gut feeling". I have indeed heard them played in recital, they are exceptionally effective.
    I'm not an atheist and I don't think I can call myself a pantheist. We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many different languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It does not know how. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn't know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being toward God.
    —Albert Einstein.

  10. #10
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    I will, from time to time, use the Eight Little Preludes and Fugues as my prelude music. The congregation absolutely loves these, if you will, "old standards" and actually listens intently to the organ instead of trying to establish voice communication with auntie Gertrude on the other side of the church.

    No offense to anyone here who may be related to aunt Gertrude ... no aunts or uncles were harmed in the creation of this post
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  11. #11
    Lieutenant Commander, Concertmaster SilverLuna's Avatar
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    Oh wow thanks everyone!! O.o

    But sadly i dont have a teacher!! :O :O My town is waaay to small even to find a good cello teacher! O.o I'm having fun teaching myself, with internet resources like YouTube, so that i won't develop bad habits But i should find one sometime though... just to see how they would think of how far I am

    Yea- preludes are easy. It's just the fugues that i'll have to consider... O.o I'll have to look at those!! Thanks so much everyone!!

    ~Silver
    SilverLuna: colorist and effects animator
    for the Wolf movie (www.wolfmovie.com)
    This is my art!! www.loboe.deviantart.com !!



    *~I'm a proud organist~*
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jtj300j129k&fmt=18
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hczd6WKMBUc&fmt=18

    ~Silver

  12. #12
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    Silver,

    Since you don't have the resources for a tutor, possibly you might entertain obtaining an excellent 'method' book. The John Stainer book is a very good resource for learning. Harold Gleason also has a method book that is excellent, but is also rather pricey in todays terms.

    I have, and still use, the Gleason book ... although when I bought it new in 1960 it only cost $6.50.

    The posted pdf files of Contratrombone64 [there have been 1,212 downloads to date] are indeed another wonderful resource ... through his graciousness, he has provided these for all of us to use, free of charge ... which is why I and added the direct link to those pieces in his post above.
    Last edited by Krummhorn; Sep-02-2009 at 07:59.
    Kh ~~.
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    fessional musicians practice until they can't get it wrong ...


  13. #13
    Rear Admiral Appassionata greatcyber's Avatar
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    That's all very good advice, indeed. That's what I love about this place!

    This morning when I awoke, I turned the tv on and it was still on the HD Net channel and there was a special about the artist Delacroix and they showcased Saint Sulpice and the organ music was astounding.
    Stephen

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    ...You Just May Be in Need of One Tomorrow.

  14. #14
    Admiral of Fugues Contratrombone64's Avatar
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    Get a copy of Stainer's Organ Method ... Dover Publications sell it (I don't work for Dover).
    I'm not an atheist and I don't think I can call myself a pantheist. We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many different languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It does not know how. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn't know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being toward God.
    —Albert Einstein.

  15. #15
    Commodore con Forza Soubasse's Avatar
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    My first was the Oxford Organ Method which would also do you no harm. It wasn't long after that that I'd moved onto the Stainer. I'd also endorse the use of the Eight Short largely because, disputes over authourship notwithstanding, they are an excellent primer to the larger, longer preludes and fugues of JSB.
    Music is made to transform the states of the soul, for an hour or an instant (J. Alain)

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