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Soubasse
Sep-06-2010, 06:08
On the weekend I played continuo for a new completion of the Mozart Requiem. A local musicologist, Letho Kostoglou, has spent quite a few years doing a lot of exhaustive research and finally managed to secure a premiere performance of his edition. It was clearly an amibitious project and I think it paid off very well, especially for a work that is relatively unique in the repertoire due to the many inconsistencies and mysteries surrounding it. Those who are accustomed to the "traditional" performances will have noticed some distinct differences, especially in the Lacrymosa and the "new" Amen fugue.

It's one of a very small number of Mozart works that I know fairly well (mainly because I find a substantial amount of Mozart's stuff hideously unlistenable) but I was glad to be a part of this performance, playing as we did to a capacity crowd and in the presence of the Governor. It will be interesting to see what reaction this edition might have internationally.

wljmrbill
Sep-06-2010, 06:52
I am sure it was work as well as alot of fun at the same time. Glad you had the chance. Any recordings(clips) of the performance?

Soubasse
Sep-06-2010, 08:01
It was recorded, but I suspect that they'll be keeping a tight hold on it whilst they vet certain parts. There were a few slip-ups (not from me of course ;) ) which they may not wish to broadcast (especially the trombones coming in two bars late in one movement!). But I'll keep an ear out for anyone interested.

marval
Sep-06-2010, 18:52
I bet you enjoyed the weekend very much, would love to hear it if that becomes possible.


Margaret

wljmrbill
Sep-06-2010, 21:08
Welcome back Margaret... Missed your posting and hope you had a GREAT HOLIDAY...

Contratrombone64
Sep-06-2010, 23:18
I'm sure the extremely talented Wolfgang Amadeus would find you hideous, too, Matt ...

Anyways, the Requiem isn't my favourite genre nor is the Mozart my favourite. Glad you had fun, Matt - were you reading of a realised continuo part of do you "do figures"?

marval
Sep-06-2010, 23:30
Thank you Bill, not a holiday just some things I had to do.


Margaret

Soubasse
Sep-07-2010, 00:46
Hi Margaret - How marvalous to see you in these hallowed halls once again! You have been missed. :)

David - I used to do figures but for this event I was reading from the full score (which included a figured bass line) so that I could "double-check" things against the vocal and instrumental parts. There were a few proofing errors in the figured bass so I was glad that I had the rest of the score there, even though it meant I had 100 times more page turns than usual (but when one is playing a continuo part on a grand organ - which I generally hate doing - that's what the feet are for, to take over from the left hand whilst turning pages. :D )

JHC
Sep-07-2010, 07:07
On the weekend I played continuo for a new completion of the Mozart Requiem. A local musicologist, Letho Kostoglou, has spent quite a few years doing a lot of exhaustive research and finally managed to secure a premiere performance of his edition. .

Sounds extremely interesting can you divulge the major differences? :)

Corno Dolce
Sep-07-2010, 08:46
Congrats Matt!!! :clap::clap::clap:

I'll be waiting to buy a copy of that recording if it ever appears.

teddy
Sep-07-2010, 15:09
Always good to hear work from the members. It is more personal and interestin, in my opinion.

teddy

Contratrombone64
Sep-08-2010, 01:11
which I generally hate doing - that's what the feet are for, to take over from the left hand whilst turning pages. :D )

Indeed and the feet are especially adept at Alberti Basses when required :confused::rolleyes:

Soubasse
Sep-09-2010, 14:30
To outline the major differences I'd need to sit down and compare scores which would take me more time than I have. Off the top of my head, the most obvious differences (for anyone who knows the work well enough) were in the Lacrymosa; instead of concluding with the "trad" short, plagal Amen, it went to an imperfect cadence which lead into an extended Amen fugue, drafts of which surfaced relatively recently (and evidently in Mozart's hand). Also, a reasonable amount of this edition was based upon work by Eybler, Mozart's last student, rather than Sussmayer (who was Mozart's copyist). The edition that I suspect most of us have been accustomed to over many years is apparently largely attributable to Sussmayer who made some curious (and inconsistent IMO) alterations. From what I can see, this new completion by Letho has made the work more even from start to finish. When I've been involved in or attended performances of the Mozart Requiem in previous years, I've often heard the comment "well I can tell which parts were not by Mozart". For my ears, it's harder to tell with this edition.

By the way, I was probably a little cruel in my initial post with the use of the word hideous. For my ears, a great deal of Wolfy's stuff I've found awfully trite and lacking in substance. His "bigger" choral pieces such as the C Minor Mass and the Requiem are the sorts of stuff I can manage to listen to. I'm also quite fond of a few of his slow movements (Adagios from Concertos, etc). Personally, I think the pinnacle of the Classical style was reached and duly surpassed by Ludwig.

Corno Dolce
Nov-08-2010, 16:12
After being "force-fed" Sussmayr's "completions", Eybler's is a Godsend :cool::cool::cool:

dll927
Nov-08-2010, 19:02
It would be interesting to know why Soubasse finds so much of Mozart "unlistenable". To say the least, he had a way with melodies. His violin and piano concertos are right up there.

Whoever wrote a "requiem" back then had to deal with the Latin wording, and there have been a number who tried.

Benedictus qui venit in nomine Domini.

Marc
May-06-2011, 12:46
Regarding Mozart's church music, I like this Requiem quite a lot, along with his unfinished C-minor Mass KV 427, the Vesperae solennes de confessore KV 339 and the Kyrie in D-minor KV 341.

Above that, Mozart is my favourite opera composer. From Idomeneo on, all his works in this genre, both buffa and seria, are true marvels IMHO.
He also delivered some great attributions to chamber music, like string quartets, quintets, and my personal faves: the piano quartets in G-minor (KV 478) and E-flat Major (KV 493).
To my ears: no lack of substance there.

Anyway: the fact that up to this day serious musicians, musicologists and composers are still busy trying to give Mozart's Requiem a truly Mozartian quality, proves to me that the guy must have had at least a touch of genius.

:)