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protos
Apr-09-2007, 10:56
Welcome to the April edition of NHM's newsletter. Last month's edition more than doubled its readership so we're sticking to the format that is proving popular. Last month's article "What is Truth in Music? (http://www.newhorizonsmusic.co.uk/news.htm#105284828)" prompted lively debate at Google and Progressive Ears (http://www.progressiveears.com/). This month's thought piece is something that interests every musician and annoys many music fans. Advertising. We also have an interview with Stone Cold (http://www.newhorizonsmusic.co.uk/interviewstonecold.htm) founder Nigel Rippon and news from Robert Fowler of Digital Chemistry (http://www.soundclick.com/digitalchemistry) about his recording activities. Lastly, we update you on our signed artists. Protos (http://www.soundclick.com/protos) climbed to the top of the 'Hottest Bands' chart at SoundClick (http://www.soundclick.com/) giving Steve and Rory a welcome boost as they record their third album. We also have news of RadioIndy (http://www.radioindy.com/), where tracks from Rory Ridley-Duff (http://www.soundclick.com/roryridleyduff)'s debut album Passing Decades (http://www.cdbaby.com/roryridleyduff1) have been enjoying further chart success.


To read more, follow the link to www.newhorizonsmusic.co.uk/news.htm (http://www.newhorizonsmusic.co.uk/news.htm)

Rayman
Apr-28-2007, 20:47
Interesting stuff!

My fascist views are that music should be analyzed according to both the theory of music and in what way it stretches the boundaries of this theory while still retaining some sort of logic that can ultimately be incorporated into the previous theoretic base.

Ofcourse, that does not give listener subjectivity much room, and the debate will still go on: Who decides what's logical?

By the way, would you be prepared to say that music theory is "epistemological" in any sense of the word?

ps:
Before anyone responds angrily to this: I do not opose the subjective reactions of individual listeners, your emotional responses to your favourite records are as legitimate as mine.

protos
Apr-30-2007, 09:11
> Interesting stuff!

Thanks.

> My fascist views are that music should be analyzed according to both the > theory of music and in what way it stretches the boundaries of this theory > while still retaining some sort of logic that can ultimately be incorporated
> into the previous theoretic base.

Inventive music usually stretches the boundaries somewhere (at least for the listener).

> Of course, that does not give listener subjectivity much room,
> and the debate will still go on: Who decides what's logical?

There is a logic to music, even if people always focus on the emotional responses that it evokes. This said, I'm not a person who focuses on logic during composition - the thing upper most in my mind is whether the music satisfying to the listen to.....

> By the way, would you be prepared to say that music theory is
> "epistemological" in any sense of the word?

Yes - the previous newsletter (March) carried an article on this subject. I do, however, think that in music knowledge is a personal thing. One person can't tell another person what the 'truth' of a piece of music is for them (any more than a book). You can look at music using an external epistemology, however. I remember once being surprised that a piece I'd written following the 'Golden Rule' about the point of recapitulation. I'm not sure whether such analysis helps to understand music. For me, music is about personal identity and social values every bit as much as any intrinsic merit. You can look at it both ways - I think.

Best wishes
Rory

BatChic
Dec-05-2011, 04:15
Oooft, how is it even possible to analyse music like that? Sometimes I just don't understand intellectualism, it ruins the subjectivity and beauty of art. Interesting topic though!

teddy
Dec-05-2011, 20:54
Hello Rayman and welcome to the forum. Here, one mans opinion is as valid as the next. We have a member here called John Watt who posts some way out, but very valid and interesting entries

teddy