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Mat
Aug-26-2007, 13:08
Tell me what's your favorite standard. Ok, I guess for me it's either "Girl from Ipanema" or "Autumn Leaves". How about you?

methodistgirl
Aug-26-2007, 21:32
I would have to say scott joplin because I like ragtime and New Orleans
style of jazz standard. There was a piece that was played on a pipe
organ called the preacher's rag and the pipe organ made it sound like
a polka played on a giant sized accordian. Even though, it sounded
really great. I also like the music of Louis Armstrong.
judytooley.:grin:

Art Rock
Aug-27-2007, 11:14
Before reading your post, Autumn leavse was the first one I thought of. That and Cry me a river.

Corno Dolce
Oct-02-2007, 11:08
Ron Carter's version of *Autumn Leaves* on his CD *The Golden Striker* is one that I listen to once a day.

intet_at_tabe
Jan-01-2008, 15:43
Tell me what's your favorite standard. Ok, I guess for me it's either "Girl from Ipanema" or "Autumn Leaves". How about you?

Hey Mat :).

Both your suggestions are very good standards, performed and recorded by hundreds of different great musicians, but I don´t think "The girl from Ipanema" composed by Carlos Jobim, in my humble opinion would be called a jazz standard. "Autumn Leaves" by Joseph Kozma/John Mercer/Jacques Prevert -however, now you´re talking.
Two other great jazz standards in my book are "All the things you are" by Jerome Kern/Oscar Hammerstein or "All of you", by Cole Porter performed by The Standards Trio - Keith Jarrett, Gary Peacock and Jack DeJohnette from the double album "Tribute" (ECM Records 1990) always does it to me. Best regards and a very happy New Year to you Mat.

Mat
Jan-01-2008, 22:06
Hello,
These were just two from the top of my head:).


I don´t think "The girl from Ipanema" composed by Carlos Jobim, in my humble opinion would be called a jazz standard. That is interesing, what you wrote. You think that "The Girl from Ipanema"/"Garote de Ipanema" can't be numered among jazz standards?


Best regards and a very happy New Year to you Mat.Thank you very much, intet-at-tabe. I also wish you all the best in this New Year.

Corno Dolce
Jan-01-2008, 23:24
My Funny Valentine and Autumn leaves are tied for first place.

Donna Murphy sings this ravishing jazz number on youtube which gets my heart bleeding:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7xERqMr_DM

Cheers,

Corno Dolce

rojo
Jan-02-2008, 08:24
Oh gee, there are so many great ones.

Here are a few that I enjoy-

Fly Me To The Moon
You Stepped Out Of A Dream
Somebody Loves Me
Lady Is A Tramp
Night And Day
Somewhere Over The Rainbow (yes, I'm a sap)
Laura
Isn't It Romantic
Caravan
Days Of Wine And Roses
What's New

etc....

intet_at_tabe
Jan-02-2008, 09:25
Hi Mat

Thank you for the reply and the best wishes.

I knew I would get myself in troubles, but please let me explain why by giving you some examples. Would you for instance call the song "Yesterday" by The Beatles - a jazz standard, because a lot of jazz musicians play/sing it, like good ole Blue Eyes (Frank Sinatra)? Or would you consider "Time after time" by Cindy Lauper - a jazz standard because the legend in modern jazz the late Miles Davis copied the song on his album "You´re under arrest" (CBS Records 1985)? Or "Imagine" by John Lennon, since three of danish top jazz musicians Palle Mikkelborg (trumpet), Kenneth Knudsen (keyboards) and the late N.H.Ø.P. (double bass) played it?

Antonio Carlos Jobim composed hundreds of songs like "Wave" - "Desafinado" - "One-Note samba" and "The girl from Ipanema", all songs american singers like Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra and Nat King Cole took into their personal repertoire. But does it make these great brazilian songs - jazz standards?

What I mean is Jazz goes to the american music history. Jazz was evolved from the blues and before the blues there were the negro spirituals (The Mills Brothers for instance).

Antonio Carlos Jobim (born 1927 in Brazil) is not an american, nor a typical educated jazz musician at all. Though many of his songs are internationally well known, I do not consider them for - jazz standards. IMHO more like pop. However it is a fact, that american jazz musicians during the 1960´s began looking down south to Brazil, Cuba and Argentina for new inspiration from Samba and Bossa Nova even Tango inspired music also because of the percussion instruments.

The internationally well known percussionist/drummer the brazilian Airto Moreira (married to vocalist Flora Purim) played with Miles Davis and later in Chick Corea´s band "Return To Forever" on songs like "Spain" - "500 miles high" - "Light as a feather" (title of the beautiful album as well by R.T.F. from Polydor Records 1972).

Anyways Mat, no matter what - I had no attack on you intended. Your opinion is as good as mine. I felt very grateful when I read your response. We obviously both dig jazz standards and jazz and brazilian composers, and I guess you also know that jazz as a musical direction evolved during the 1960-70´s into electric jazz with groups like R.T.F., Weather Report, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Sergio Mendez and Brazil 66´.

Respect to you Mat from intet-at-tabe.

intet_at_tabe
Jan-02-2008, 09:52
rojo

You obviously know your Frank Sinatra song list, all jazz standards. Frank Sinatra as a jazz singer a
favourite of mine too.

If you know of Keith Jarrett, then you know that the song "Somewhere Over The Rainbow" is his personal favourite jazz standard, one of mine too.

Best wishes for you as well in 2008,
intet-at-tabe

Mat
Jan-02-2008, 12:45
Hi intet-at-tabe,

Thank you for your response.



I knew I would get myself in troubles, but please let me explain why by giving you some examples.

No, no, I'm actually very glad that I can hear someone else's opinion on this. I find it very interesing. I would only like to say jazz is so wide and various definition that sometimes it is difficult to define explicitly whether something is a jazz standard or not. I also do respect your opinion on this topic.

I hope that now you are here with us, we will bring some more life into jazz section of this great forum:).

And about "Somewhere Over The Rainbow". Without a doubt, this is a fabolous piece. Actually, you may want to check out Blink 182's version of it. Not very much jazz in this version but still worth to be listened:grin:, IMHO.

Best regards,
Mat.

intet_at_tabe
Jan-02-2008, 14:01
Hi back to you Mat (almost like on a chat today)

You said: "I hope that now you are here with us, we will bring some more life into jazz section of this great forum:).". You may bank on it!!;)

And then you said: "I would only like to say jazz is so wide and various definition that sometimes it is difficult to define explicitly whether something is a jazz standard or not.". Agreed. Some of the artists, who record with the ECM Records, I wouldn´t know whether it is jazz, rock or classical or perhaps a fourth ethnic unknown style of music.

If you remember an english group from the beginning of the 1970´s ELP equals Emerson, Lake and Palmer. They played music for instance by the classical composer Musorsky "Pictures at an exibition" for instance. But I would not dare to put a certain label to this kind of music.

The brazilian multi-instrumentalist Egberto Gismonti, who is considered a jazz musician often plays and record with a symphony orchestra as backup. Personally, I can´t tell whether it´s jazz or classical music.

Also the norwegian jazz saxophonist Jan Garbarek has done some cross over music with The Hilliard Ensemble.

Like the live improvised solo-piano concerts by Keith Jarrett. I could not tell whether it´s jazz or classical piano music. But then Jarrett also plays and has recorded classical piano copying Shostakovitch and Mozart for instance, or in a duet with the danish recorder virtuoso Mikela Petri.

My all time favourite jazz album however, at the same time favourite jazz standard songs come from "Kind of blue" by Miles Davis (CBS Records 1959). Incredible album. But then it does not hurt this band nor the songs, that the tenor saxophone master John Coltrane and the alto saxophone master Julian "Cannonball" Adderly with Bill Evans/Wynton Kelly (both on piano) and the legendary Paul Chambers (bass) and Jimmy Cobb (drums) sat in during those recordings.

See you later. Have a great day Mat!!

Regards, intet-at-tabe

Mat
Jan-02-2008, 14:24
If you remember an english group from the beginning of the 1970´s ELP equals Emerson, Lake and Palmer. They played music for instance by the classical composer Musorsky "Pictures at an exibition" for instance.

I'm afraid I don't know this group. I was born after 1970;). But I'll google it and see what comes up.



My all time favourite jazz album however, at the same time favourite jazz standard songs come from "Kind of blue" by Miles Davis (CBS Records 1959). Incredible album.

This is wonderful album, indeed. Also "My fuuny Valentine" and "Someday my prince will come" are great standards, especially when he plays them:grin:. I've read Miles Davies autobiography recently. Very interesing book. You get to know so much informations about him and his life. I really do recommend it.

Regards,
Mat.

intet_at_tabe
Jan-02-2008, 15:53
You´re so right Mat :D - Btw. greetings to all polish citizens. I visited Warsaw, Radem (about a 100 kilometers south of Warsaw) and Krakow in the summer 1989, a few months before the Berlin Wall was broken down from each side of the former two Germany´s. Krakow the culturel center in Poland before the WWII with it´s roofs made of solid gold, at least from what we were told. I also visited the city of Oswiesim, where the NAZI camp Ausschwits was in those terrible years during the WWII, where millions of people were killed, because of a little austrian painter with no whatsoever respect on humanity.

Quote: "This is wonderful album, indeed. Also "My fuuny Valentine" and "Someday my prince will come" are great standards, especially when he plays them:grin:.".

Agreed. I have in my huge Miles Davis collection the double album "My funny Valentine" feat. George Coleman (tenor saxophone), Herbie Hancock (piano), Ron Carter (bass) and the incredible Tony Williams (drums). The latter Tony Williams was only 17 years of age, when Miles spotted him. Tony passed away a few years ago.

Replace George Coleman for Wayne Shorter (tenor and soprano saxophone) and you´ll have the famous Miles Davis Quintet, which made so many live performances and recordings around the world, from Tokyo, Japan to Berlin, Germany, to Montreal, Canada and the Montreux Jazz Festival in Schwitzerland.

Of course being polish you would know Tomasz Stanko (trumpet), who has contributed to the catalog from the ECM Records?

It seems Mat, we´re on the same shelf around jazz, jazz standards and Miles Davis.

Thanks Mat,
intet-at-tabe

Mat
Jan-02-2008, 19:42
Well well, I didn't know you have been to Poland. Hope you enjoyed it. Feel free to come and visit again. If you let me, I' d like to recommend to you our beautiful seaside. You may want to visit such places as Sopot, Mrzeżyno or Ustka.


Of course being polish you would know Tomasz Stanko (trumpet), who has contributed to the catalog from the ECM Records?

Yes, indeed, I've heard about him but to be honest I don't know his music very well. I have only one of his albums. I'm just not really into it (yet:grin:). Besides, I have so much other jazz music I haven't listened yet (even though I want to) that, being busy man that I am, I simply didn't have enough time for this. But lately because of Christmas and New Year I've had a longer break. Finally I could cath up a little bit with all the music:).

P.S Guess what I'm listenig to right now? Nothing else but Tomasz Stańko - "Suspended night". That's the one album I have. And I think it is you that motivated me to:D.

Cheers,
Mat.

intet_at_tabe
Jan-02-2008, 20:30
Mat - confession time.


Well well, I didn't know you have been to Poland. Hope you enjoyed it. Feel free to come and visit again. If you let me, I' d like to recommend to you our beautiful seaside. You may want to visit such places as Sopot, Mrzeżyno or Ustka.

To be honest with you Mat recollecting our vacation to Poland, that is the parts I do remember, specificly from the city of Radom (not Radem). The people we visited showed us great hospitality, and much curiosity about driving my Ford Kadett 1,3 (12 people stood in line the whole afternoon to try it out behind the wheel). Then the first evening they all showed me the polish way on how to drink Vodka. Now, for you to know, I am not and have never been a great drinker of alkohol in generel, which became quite obvious around 9 P.M. some two hours after we (the 12 men, who had stood in line) in the evening with their wives and some neighbours included and our hosts sat around a long table. They all wanted to see, talk to and salute this danish "giraf" - individually. Everyone personly wanted to say Cheers to me in Vodka. For reasons I never knew they did not seem to have any soft drinks. Never before in my entire life or ever since have I been as drunk as then, and the size of the hangover the next day??? You know, when not used to alcohol. But what could I do as a guest, I mean I had to represent Denmark in a polite mature diplomatic (?) way, and my father told me before leaving for Poland: "It is not polite to say no, when asked to salute to someone".

Today I still believe, that night in Radom, Poland in 1989, visiting the family of my wife, surrounded by all these friendly smiling cheering laughing polish people, who found one bottle after the next from places I did not know excisted, made a crusual damage to my second marriage then. She, who should always be obeyed, did not think my version of the polish national anthem during the evening - was properly sung. Of course I never argued it with her, mostly because I couldn´t remember having sung the polish anthem or much else :eek::smash:.

Quote: "P.S Guess what I'm listenig to right now? Nothing else but Tomasz Stańko - "Suspended night". That's the one album I have. And I think it is you that motivated me to:D.".

Wow Mat :), for me it is only the second day here, and I have motivated you to listen to polish jazz and Tomasz Stanko. Now Mat, this could be the beginning of a beautiful friendship...(except from the american movie "Casablanca" feat. Bogart/Bergman).

Thank you Mat, and I am not finished with Poland at all - great country, nature and history, not to mention the union leader Lech Valensa and the SOLIDANOSZ movement.

I think, I read some where that you play the instrument oboe? If this is right, then perhaps you should listen to an american jazz musician Paul McCandless, who also plays oboe and english horn in jazz along with different saxophones and bassclarinet as well, who has recorded with the german Eberhard Weber (weber upstanding el. bass) and his group and the well known american band OREGON from the state with the same name on the west coast of the USA.

Reading your post Mat made me feel very cool :cool:.

Mat
Jan-02-2008, 21:06
That is quite impressive post:). Thank you for sharing.

However, I feel I need to say that it has changed a lot since your visit. I do not want to go any further about this as Poland has very rich history and this jazz forum after all.;)

As a matter of fact, I do play oboe. And I even tried to play some jazz but I was no good in this. Now, when it comes to jazz I rather stick to piano. And call it telepathy or whatever you want - I've been looking for some jazz-oboe-players for a long time now. And I managed to find only one. Jean Luc-Fillon is the one. He plays both oboe and english horn. Here is some sample of music he plays http://pl.youtube.com/watch?v=ijo9HyHIc7Y. I thought that I would find maybe someone out here who can help me with finding more of his music but I had no luck. I have only few of his recordings but I definately want some more. I've never heard of Paul McCandles but I'm gonna check this guy out:). Thanks for suggestion.


P.S Stańko maybe I don't know too well but I like Polish jazz musicians. For example Adam Makowicz, Leszek Możdzer, Andrzej Kurylewicz Wojciech Karolak or Jan Ptaszyn Wróblewski:). They are all great.

Take care,
Mat.

intet_at_tabe
Jan-02-2008, 22:42
Mat, check out this link: www.ecm.com (http://www.ecm.com) 0r simply google ECM Records and Paul McCandless and Tomasz Stanko or OREGON. Press artists and there you´ll find it all.

Paul McCandless also played with a friend of his Fred Simon (piano) and Steve Rodby (double bass), the latter who has played the double bass/el. bass with the Pat Metheny Group for more than twenty years. Both of them from the USA on Fred Simon´s album "Remember the river" 2004 from a label called www.naim-audio.com (http://www.naim-audio.com)

Adam Makowicz (piano) I already know, if he is the one you mentioned.

So you also play the piano. Are you classical educated on oboe and/or piano? Perhaps you have played professionally in a symphony orchestra? Or a smaller ensemble?

I watched Jean Luc-Fillon earlier today on youtube, unfortunately my speakers are dead at the moment.

Best regards,
intet-at-tabe

Mat
Jan-03-2008, 11:11
Thanks for the links. I'll check them out as soon as it's possible. I see that Paul McCandless plays also a soprano saxophone. That's even better 'cause I love sopran.:)

The case of my education is quite complicated. I'm being educated classical on oboe. I had about ten years of piano education, however this is not my main instrument. I also played cello for a couple of years. But it was ages ago.

I played in few amateur orchestras, for example Youth Philharmonic Orchestra (if you'd like to hear some samples of what we played contact me via PM).

My break I mentioned earlier, is now over. So I may not be so frequent guest for next few days.

Regards,
Mat.

intet_at_tabe
Jan-03-2008, 14:48
[quote=Mat;32126]

My break I mentioned earlier, is now over. So I may not be so frequent guest for next few days. [quote]

Don´t worry Mat, I´ll be here whenever you wish to talk again.

I´ll send you the best blessings while you´re back to working hours with some deep thoughts on Miles Davis.

First of all he was a very distingquished trumpet player. He never played or recorded a lot on the flugelhorn, but he did one album that I have where he only used the flugelhorn "Miles Ahead" Columbia Records, 1958. His co-musicians on this album are: Wynton Kelly (piano) Paul Chambers (bass) and Art taylor (drums) and The Gil Evans Orchestra. Funny Gil Evans´s real name is Ian Ernest Gilmore Green, just a footnote.

I believe Miles Davis had an almost one-man-kind-of-talent. He always managed to find new musicians on various instruments, who were about to make the breakthrough on the american jazz scene, and sort of just needed the last puuuush (as the late rock star the incredible very missed Frank Zappa/Mothers would say it).

I happened to watch an interview on the TV some years back during the danish night with the very young at the time new international (almost) star on tenor and soprano saxophone: Bill Evans. He told the funny story on how Miles contacted him at Bill Evans home adress, and said: "My name is Miles Davis. My band will do a concert to night in Baltimore. I would like to hear you live, so if you want to play with the band, please show up at 6 P.M."

That was the message by phone.

Bill Evans of course knew of Miles Davis a-legend-in-jazz (who didn´t?), an he felt almost embarrased and a bit nervous to get the chance to play with Miles Band for the first time, and then live.

So Bill turned up, and Miles instructed Bill Evans after the introduction to the rest of the band members: "Bill, you know the songs we play, right? We always improvise during concerts. Just fall in and follow me, keep the time and the rhytm, and I will signal you with my eyes and then you play solo".

That was it. Bill Evans after the concert became a member of the Miles Davis Band, and later began recording with his own bands.

Miles Davis had this very significant talent to be able almost to see inside someone, whether he was good or not, and just needed the final puuuush. Every famous jazz musician from Keith Jarrett, Chick Corea, Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, Dave Holland, Joe Zawinul, Miroslav Vitous (from the former Chechoslovakai - proberly spelled wrong), Anthony Braxton, John Mclaughlin, Tony Williams, Jack DeJohnette, Marcus Miller, Airto Moreia, John Scofield, Mike Stern, Mino Cinelu etc.etc.etc. All of them played with Miles who gave the musicians inspiration and one chance playing with him and his current band, and they all succeded in each their own bands later in life.

That talent of Miles Davis to me is what Miles Davis was all about. An incredible trumpet player, band leader and then this significant talent to spot new talents and give them the room they needed to do the very best they could offer, musicians who would carry on as international jazz musicians.

I had the pleasure to attend a concert close to where I live years ago, after his many years of illness, in the beginning of the 1980´s around the time after the release of his album "The man with the horn" 1981. The band then were Miles (trumpet) Bill Evans (soprano saxophone), Barry Finnerty/Mike Stern (guitars) Robert Irving III (piano, keyboards), Randy Hall (vocals, syntheziser, guitar), Marcus Miller/Felton Crews (fender el. bass), Vincent Wilburn/Al Foster (drums) and finally Sammy Figuera (percussion).

The press the next day felt angry, cheeted and told that Miles Davis was arrogant on the stage, because Miles at all times had his back to the audience. But then that was Miles in the essence. His appearence on any stage was always in close interaction with each musician in his band. That was what counted to the legend Miles Davis. Obviosly the musicians they knew, that improvising on the stage in front of thousands of audience, there had to be at least one leader, who keept the whole shabang together, like a conductor, and yet not.

So Mat you´re classical educated and play oboe, piano, cello and have dreams for the soprano saxophone. Some day (if God and you will) you´ll make your own one-man-band chamber orchestra. or perhaps something in jazz, like the englishman John Surman, an expert on the soprano saxophone and various other instruments. I wish to be alive then.

See you and take care on the roads if slippery,
intet-at-tabe

Mat
Jan-05-2008, 19:41
This is one impressive post of yours, intet-at-tabe:).

I see Miles Davies really is one of your favorites. Indeed, on stage he wasn't too talkative. In fact he was very clear about that. His job was to play, not to talk to the odeons. It often caused problems. Some of people (also reviewers) couldn't accept that. But despite numerous criticism he never significantly changed.


So Mat you´re classical educated and play oboe, piano, cello and have dreams for the soprano saxophone.

That cello thing was rather an accident. It didn't bring much into my life. However thanks to oboe I could go to a tournée and different oboe courses. This really helped me with the stage fright;).

rojo
Jan-06-2008, 06:29
rojo

You obviously know your Frank Sinatra song list, all jazz standards. Frank Sinatra as a jazz singer a
favourite of mine too.

If you know of Keith Jarrett, then you know that the song "Somewhere Over The Rainbow" is his personal favourite jazz standard, one of mine too.

Best wishes for you as well in 2008,
intet-at-tabeHi intet-at-tabe,

I do like old blue eyes a lot, but I didn't really have him in mind in particular when I made that short list. I've definitely heard him sing Fly Me To The Moon, and Lady Is A Tramp, but not all the others.

I think I recall hearing Oliver Jones playing Somewhere Over The Rainbow, and that was pretty great. I like Judy Garland's classic rendition as well.

Caravan I've heard a number of times by various artists. Neat tune.

I've heard Linda Ronstadt (and others) sing What's New; enjoyed that, with arrangements by Nelson Riddle.

Do you think Brubeck's Take Five is a jazz standard? Or Herbie Hancock's Watermelon Man?

intet_at_tabe
Jan-07-2008, 10:45
Hi intet-at-tabe,

I do like old blue eyes a lot, but I didn't really have him in mind in particular when I made that short list. I've definitely heard him sing Fly Me To The Moon, and Lady Is A Tramp, but not all the others.

I think I recall hearing Oliver Jones playing Somewhere Over The Rainbow, and that was pretty great. I like Judy Garland's classic rendition as well.

Caravan I've heard a number of times by various artists. Neat tune.

I've heard Linda Ronstadt (and others) sing What's New; enjoyed that, with arrangements by Nelson Riddle.

Do you think Brubeck's Take Five is a jazz standard? Or Herbie Hancock's Watermelon Man?

Hi rojo

In every music style there are some musicians, who rank higher than others. Duke Ellington´s "Take the A train" is not only a jazz standard for it´s own time, but in jazz throughout decades. "Strangers in the night" and "My way", originally written by Paul Anka, the same goes for ole Blue Eyes. Like the Dave Brubeck Quartet and the classic jazz standard for it´s time "Take Five". DB from 1951 with Paul Desmond (alto saxophone), Eugene Wright (bass) and Joe Morello (drums) and later with Gerry Mulligan.

I am a bit short on Herbie Hancock outside his days with The Miles Davis Quintet, and only recently I´ve got two albums with him "The Essentials" Sony/BMG songs from 1962-95, where "Watermelon man" is on disc one first tune. Definitely a classic Hancock tune, but whether it´s a jazz standard I don´t know. If you believe it is, I take your word for it. The other album "Directions in Music" from Verve 2002. Quite a jump from "Watermelon man".

You mentioned "Caravan". Have you heard the guitarist Bireli Lagrene out of the Django Reinhardt school (incredible acoustic guitarist as well as on electric) play "Caravan"? Awesome.

My ultimate Frank Sinatra song is "In the wee small hours of the morning". It has that Chicago like jazz club feeling over it, late at night in a basement room, filled with smoke.

The Nelson Riddle Orchestra made a lot of albums and performances with Frank Sinatra.

Best regards,
intet-at-tabe

intet_at_tabe
Jan-07-2008, 11:01
This is one impressive post of yours, intet-at-tabe:).

I see Miles Davies really is one of your favorites. Indeed, on stage he wasn't too talkative. In fact he was very clear about that. His job was to play, not to talk to the odeons. It often caused problems. Some of people (also reviewers) couldn't accept that. But despite numerous criticism he never significantly changed.

That cello thing was rather an accident. It didn't bring much into my life. However thanks to oboe I could go to a tournée and different oboe courses. This really helped me with the stage fright;).

Hi Mat

You´re so right about your Miles comments. But take Keith Jarrett in the same department about audiences and rewievers. Many people around the planet, who love his improvised solo-piano concerts, but HATE his singing/humming along with playing the piano, even dancing behind the piano as well. I don´t mind one bit, to Jarrett I believe he could not play or improvise, if he could not humn. To Jarrett it´s as natural as breathing air.

Have you heard of a jazz cello player called DAVID DARLING? Tell all of us some day about your touring experiences on the oboe, please!

It pleases me to hear you got rid of your stage fright, I happen to know what you mean.

Best regards,
intet-at-tabe

rojo
Jan-07-2008, 20:17
What a 'faux-pas'; I really should have said Paul Desmond's Take Five... :o

You're very polite not to rub it in my face, intet-at-tabe, and to make up for my careless error, I'll post the tune! :grin:

From 1961, the Dave Brubeck Quartet-
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDOgYw5-pNs

Well, just to say, my favourite version of Watermelon Man is actually Mongo Santamaria's. The tune is probably not a jazz standard, although it has been covered a fair amount, I think.

Another tune Sinatra sings that I like a lot is I Get A Kick Out Of You. I'll probably think of others...

Will be checking out the version of Caravan you suggest. :)

What the heck; here's Mongo Santamaria's Watermelon Man-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vjJaH40rArU

It always gets me bopping my head. :grin:

intet_at_tabe
Jan-07-2008, 22:56
rojo

I hate to tell you this, but my speakers are out of order. But as soon as they are on again, I´ll rush to this post from you.

Best regards,
intet-at-tabe

intet_at_tabe
Jan-08-2008, 03:43
[quote=rojo;32830]What a 'faux-pas'; I really should have said Paul Desmond's Take Five... :o

You're very polite not to rub it in my face, intet-at-tabe, and to make up for my careless error, I'll post the tune! :grin:

From 1961, the Dave Brubeck Quartet-
DDOgYw5-pNs

Hi rojo,

It´s easy and all free to be polite.

The song "Caravan" played by Bireli Lagrene and The West Deutscher Rundfunk Big band, can be found on the album BL´s album "Djangology", tune 9, Dreyfus Jazz 2006.

Later in Dave Brubeck´s career, when his sons Chris B. (bass and trombone) and Danny B. (drums) had grown up, they formed a trio sometimes with the additional Bill Smith (el. bass). Since Dave Brubeck seemed to work better in a quartet. For instance on "Iola", I think it was on Concord Jazz 1984.

Paul Desmond was a terrific saxophone player, and of course Gerry Mulligan too.

Best regards,
intet-at-tabe

intet_at_tabe
Jan-12-2008, 12:07
Your favourite Jazz Standard the headline originally said.

Now this might come as a surprice to Corno Dolce and all of you, when I mention my all time favourite jazz musician, my personal numero uno is Keith Jarrett (here should be a laughing emoticon). The jazz standard favourite is "The Song Is You", 17:33 minutes, the album "Still Live" ECM Records 1988. "The Song Is You", composed by the two jazz notabilities Jerome Kern/Oscar Hammerstein. KJ and the Trio has played this one on other records as well, like he has done "All the things you are" or "All of you", but my heart points at this double album and this song. (I still got the old vinyl version as well in a safety deposite box (what happened to the emoticons?)).

One could ask in all honesty, how can a guy none educated in music, never actually played an instrument, and yet LOVE Keith Jarrett and the Standards Trio as my mentors in jazz equillibrism. Highly - all of them - educated musicians towards an ameteur and big mouth.

The first time I listened to it, I was quite overwhelmed by KJ´s attack on the piano from the beginning of the song soloing, like someone in a duel, using both the low and the high register. Imagine thinking of the song itself, that I have known before KJ: Thing isn´t the way it used to be. But then as always KJ find his way into the real deal, assistet by a very inflamatory agressive Jack DeJohnette setting the speed, while Gary Peacock probaly thinking: It´s always the same, neither Keith nor Jack can play the same piece the same way - ever. They have to improvise.

There is a DVD, where Gary Peacock tell this smiling and shaking his head a bit. They are all old- oletimers.

This is in particular to me an admirable ability, what I really enjoy by the Standards Trio, always innovative, always ready, set and go.

Through the song Jarrett/Peacock/DeJohnette demonstrates from a high court of distinguished musicianship, why they have been among the 10 top jazz musicians live on each their instruments and as the Standards Trio for the past 25 years, always in the highest gear, alert and the close admiration for one another in companionship as friends outside the world stages, the interaction with each other, everything work.

As I said, this might have been a surprice to you and Corno Dolce, but now and forever more you all know.

Best regards,
the somehow amputated intet-

Corno Dolce
Jan-12-2008, 17:46
Hi Intet,

Please share why I should be surprised that KJ is your fav Jazz musician? For those who are serious about Jazz, its a perfect match. Imagine if Jarrett and DeJohnette had Ron Carter as trio member? That would have been simply fabulous in my humble opinion.

Cheers,

Corno Dolce

P.s. Back on topic: "80/81" by Pat Metheny.

Mat
Jan-12-2008, 19:35
Hi intet,


Have you heard of a jazz cello player called DAVID DARLING?

No, I haven't. Can you tell something more 'bout him?



Tell all of us some day about your touring experiences on the oboe, please!

You bet:grin::):grin:.


Remember you told me about this jazz oboist - Paul McCandless? I did some searching and found out more about him. I even managed to get some albums of his. Right now I'm listening to 'Isole'. On this album he plays oboe, soprano saxophone, bass clarinet and english horn. You can also hear Bebo Ferra (guitar), Paolino Dalla Porta (contrabass) and Fulvio Maras (drums). I've also listened to John Surman's 'Morning Glory' but didn't like it too much. However, thank you for all your advices:).


Regards,
Mat

intet_at_tabe
Jan-13-2008, 07:00
Hi Intet,

Please share why I should be surprised that KJ is your fav Jazz musician? For those who are serious about Jazz, its a perfect match. Imagine if Jarrett and DeJohnette had Ron Carter as trio member? That would have been simply fabulous in my humble opinion.

Cheers,

Corno Dolce

P.s. Back on topic: "80/81" by Pat Metheny.

Hi Corno Dolce

A stupid remark ;):):grin: meant to be funny, since you of all people and I share Keith Jarrett and Pat Metheny and Ron Carter as favs, which to me almost is a miracle. It would be obvious, that you would definitely know my statement about KJ and the Standards Trio with the song "The Song Is You", saying this might be a surprice to Corno Dolce, would be false.

So in respect back at you again at my usual self leaving the jokes department, I´ll give you Ron Carter "Parade" feat. another great tenor saxophone player Joe Henderson, Chick Corea (piano) and Tony Williams (drums) with a brass band to finish the whole set.

You hit another Pat Metheny album 80/81 ECM Records 1980 - AWESOME album feat. the late Michael Brecker and the late Dewey Redman (tenor saxophones), Charlie Haden (double bass) and Jack DeJohnette (drums). My favs on this particular album are the first song CD 1 ""Two Folk Songs" and "The Bat". On CD 2 "Every Day (I Thank You)" and the final acoustic solo guitar "Goin Ahead".

Best regards compadre,
intet-at-tabe

intet_at_tabe
Jan-13-2008, 07:49
Hi intet,



No, I haven't. Can you tell something more 'bout him?




You bet:grin::):grin:.


Remember you told me about this jazz oboist - Paul McCandless? I did some searching and found out more about him. I even managed to get some albums of his. Right now I'm listening to 'Isole'. On this album he plays oboe, soprano saxophone, bass clarinet and english horn. You can also hear Bebo Ferra (guitar), Paolino Dalla Porta (contrabass) and Fulvio Maras (drums). I've also listened to John Surman's 'Morning Glory' but didn't like it too much. However, thank you for all your advices:).


Regards,
Mat

Hi Mat, hows ya been dude.

Do I remember? :);):grin::cool: Yes I do my dear polish friend. I have been thinking all week of you. How is Mat doing? Now I know.

I am delighted that you found the albums with Paul McCandless, and even listened to John Surman as well. I don´t know of the album you call "Isole" with PM, not the musicians either, but I thank you for giving me the oppotunity to find it, which I will.

David Darling is a classical educated cellist, but has moved in to the jazz department as well, also playing electric 4 and 8 string cellos. On ECM he recorded an album with a very interesting group of musicians from diferent parts of the world. The album is titled "Cycles" ECM Records 1981 feat. Darling (cello, el. cello), Jan Garbarek (tenor and soprano saxophone), Arild Andersen (double bass) the late Colin Walcott (from OREGON like Paul McCandless) on tabla, zitar, perc., Oscar Neves (acoustic guitar) and Steve Kuhn (piano). Beautiful music.

David Darling (USA), like another cello player Jacques Morelenbaum (Brazil) have played with jazz musicians like the above mentioned, with Egberto Gismonti on his album "Infancia" and "Musica De Sobrevivenca" ECM Records 1991 and 1993 feat. Gismonti (piano, synthezisers, 8 and 10 string acoustic guitars), Nando Carneiro (acoustic guitar, synthezisers) Zeca Assumpcao (double bass) amd Jacques Morelenbaum (cello). The latter also with the rock musician STING (former Police) on STING´s albums "Fields of Gold", "All This Time" and "Sacred Love", A & M Records 1994/01/03.

David Darling, born 1941 in Elkhart, Indiana, USA. Studies both at Indiana University classical musical line and the Berklee School of Music. Tutored by former concert cellist Fritz Maag and personal cello teacher Janos Starker. From 1969 member of the group Winter Consort, which combined jazz and renaissance music with an ethnic touch. From the late 1970´s DD recorded with Glen Moore (double bass), known from the band OREGON and Zbigniew Seifert (violin ). From 1979 attachted to ECM Records. Recorded with Ralph Towner (leader of OREGON) 6-12 string acoustic guitars, piano, french horn on the album "Old Friends, New Friends", ECM Records 1979 feat. Kenny Wheeler (trumpet and flugelhorn), David Darling (cello, el. cello), Eddie Gomez (double bass) and Michael DiPasqua (drums, perc.). Solo album by DD "Journal October" 1979. In 1980/81 in the group Gallery feat. John Clark (french horn), Paul McCandless (you already know) and David Samuels (vibraphone and marimba, perc.). In 1982 with the norwegian el. guitar/syntheziser guitarist Terje Rypdal on the duo album "EOS", introducing his 8 string el. cello.

So my dear polish highly estimated friend Mat now you know a bit more about David Darling, I hope you can use it. I hope the weather compliments you Mat and is better in Poland than in Denmark, thinking of a song called "Rain".

One question for you Mat out of pure curiosity. Do you have libraries near by you, where you can borrow music on CD´s ?

Best regards to you Mat, be well, always safe and do not be a stranger,
intet-at-tabe

Corno Dolce
Jan-13-2008, 10:42
"Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out To Dry" with Jarrett, Peacock, and DeJohnette has now become my fav Jazz standard. I've had it repeat-playing in my car stereo for a least a week and I'm not even tired of it - its always fresh and new with every repeat - how many pieces of music can accomplish that?

intet_at_tabe
Jan-13-2008, 14:40
"Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out To Dry" with Jarrett, Peacock, and DeJohnette has now become my fav Jazz standard. I've had it repeat-playing in my car stereo for a least a week and I'm not even tired of it - its always fresh and new with every repeat - how many pieces of music can accomplish that?

Corno Dolce

I guess, when one can not drive his car without listening to "Guess I´ll Hang My Tears Out To Dry" repeatedly, then it must be a favoruite of yours.

Best regards,
intet-at-tabe

Mat
Jan-13-2008, 16:02
Hello intet,

First off, I'd like to thank you for the post about David Darling. Lots of informations, all very interesing and useful.

The weather out here is hopeless... As I worte earlier in other posts there is no snow and instead of it we have rain and temperatures don't even go below 0°C. Days are short and I couldn't even make a snowman...:p



One question for you Mat out of pure curiosity. Do you have libraries near by you, where you can borrow music on CD´s ?

Yes, I have but to be honest I don't use them. Usually I borrow CDs form my friends or simply use Internet as a source.:)


Take care and 'don't worry, be happy' as Bobby sung,
Mat

Corno Dolce
Jan-13-2008, 16:43
Hello Intet,

Well, there is a decent climate-control system in the car so that I can listen to the sublime music undisturbed. The music lets me forget about that which bothers me so that I can concentrate on driving in a proper manner. I have the music on my Ipod and so does my lady, so that is what we have with us when we visit Prague for our Honeymoon.

Respectfully yours,

Corno Dolce

intet_at_tabe
Jan-13-2008, 19:22
Corno Dolce

Honeymoon, Wow!! Congratulations to the both of you, it pleases me to hear. I´ll write you a PM.

Now for the topic:

Alex Riel (drums) if not the very best drummer in Denmark, then the most experienced with more than 40 years behind the drums and cymbals playing in different groups playing different styles of music. Our host Frederik Magle (organ) has recorded in 1994 on RCA with both Alex Riel, the late NHØP and Niels Lan Doky (look below) among others. The songs on the album reflects the adventures of the world famous danish writer of adventures Hans Christian Andersen. Hip Hip Frederik!! The title in danish is "Sangen er et eventyr", forgive me Frederik if I translate wrong: The song is an adventure.

Alex Riel, who originally was educated as a hair dresser, until his father gave up any further discussions on the subject.

From Alex Riel´s album "Unriel" Stunt Records 1997 feat. Niels Lan Doky (remarkable danish pianist), Jerry Bergonzi/Michael Brecker (tenor saxophone) Mike Stern (el. guitar) and finally Eddie Gomez (double bass).

In the middle of the 1960´s former Miles Davis pianist Bill Evans was going on an extended Europe tour. One problem though. He did not have his ordinary drummer. So what does one do? Alex Riel exitedly responded the call from over the pond. Done deal. Alex toured with The Bill Evans Trio with Eddie Gomez on the double bass throughout Europe, and made himself known to any european jazz audience. Coincidence?

Best regards,
intet-at-tabe

NEB
Jan-13-2008, 19:49
HUH? Did I hear Honeymoon? Is that a great big wopping congratulations? :tiphat: :cheers:

intet_at_tabe
Jan-13-2008, 19:57
Mat!!

You´re always welcome.

Best regards,
intet-at-tabe

Corno Dolce
Jan-14-2008, 02:50
Thanx Intet and NEB - I appreciate it.

intet_at_tabe
Jan-14-2008, 07:19
While at it yesterday with Alex Riel, I figured you should have another album from his hands, since the guys "upstairs" has planned for a dry monday with no rain? Well living in Denmark, you´ll never know until the end of the day. Perhaps our common song the other day by the Beatles "Here comes the sun" helped.

The Alex Riel album on this monday morning is "Rielatin" feat. Kenny Werner (piano), Jerry Bergonzi/Michael Brecker (tenor saxophone), Mike Stern (el. guitar) and Chris Minh Doky (double bass). Chris is the brother of Niels Lan Doky (piano) mentioned yesterday.

Best regards to all of you friendly people,
intet-at-tabe

intet_at_tabe
Jan-14-2008, 07:40
Thanx Intet and NEB - I appreciate it.

Corno Dolce

Come to think of your gently reply "I appreciate it". Well Corno Dolce, so will all of us at MIMF receiving invitations for the bachelor party prior to the marriage from some of the older more mature and experienced crowd here. :grin::grin::grin:

Also it is very important for the groom to actually be there at the church on time sober and ready. See you!! :tiphat::clap::wave:

Best regards,
intet-at-tabe

Corno Dolce
Jan-14-2008, 12:25
Hello Intet,

My Lady is the better half of me and she far outshines me - I wonder sometimes what she sees in me? She always provides the best for me and cares very much for my well being. So much so that she does not want to see me getting involved in a bachelor party - I shall duly follow her advice.

Cheers,

Corno Dolce

intet_at_tabe
Jan-14-2008, 15:33
Hello Intet,

My Lady is the better half of me and she far outshines me - I wonder sometimes what she sees in me? She always provides the best for me and cares very much for my well being. So much so that she does not want to see me getting involved in a bachelor party - I shall duly follow her advice.

Cheers,

Corno Dolce

Corno Dolce - Can´t help myself.

Easy does it my friend. A marriage is like a job of your highest expectations, the more you offer and give the more you profit. There is her, there is you and then what the two of you share (sorry compadre for the hidden insider trading here) not driving a car, eh? :grin::grin::grin::cool::cool::cool:

A piece of advice though and also the very reason for the nessesary bachelor party, we´ve all been there - before you fall to your knees throwing the towel to the center of the ring. :grin::grin::grin::cool::cool::cool:

Easy does it. Remember you´re gonna last hopefully for 50-60 years in love, be role models for your 13 little ones, where you are the father. You´ll be plenty occupied.

But you know the drill. Share your love but keep your bank accounts secreter than secret.

Just kiddin´with you compadre,
intet-at-tabe

Corno Dolce
Jan-14-2008, 19:20
Hi Intet,

Keep up with the good humor dear sir and soon we might see you as the next great TV comedian. :):):):grin::grin::grin:

No, there won't be a bachelor party - My Lady has saved me from much embarassment during the course of our courtship.

Cheers,

Corno Dolce

intet_at_tabe
Jan-15-2008, 10:48
Corno Dolce,

Thankx for the joke :):):):grin::grin::grin: on my behalf: Keep up with the good humor dear sir and soon we might see you as the next great TV comedian. Thankx, but No thankx.

As a stand-up comedian you simply have to be able to remember the intire story, and have the talent to tell it in a funny way. But I never can remember the story nor tell it funny. Which makes me as a potential TV comedian into a humiliating example of someone, who should never in his wildest dreams copy "Raw", by Eddie Murphy or you compadre :):):):grin::grin::grin:

But then you seem to have enough on your hands at the moment, planning the upcoming happy and most deserved event. Though, nothing funny about that since there won´t be a bachelor party. A piece of advice though for you and the lady in question about the music you guys will choose, when you have given each other your love, the promises to turn around walking down the aisle. Betthoven´s 5th Symphony can be awesome, inspirering and beautiful, but not for this occasion :):):):grin::grin::grin:

Best regards,
intet-at-tabe

Corno Dolce
Jan-15-2008, 11:58
Hi Intet,

We've already chosen the music: For the Processional we'll have William Walton's "Crown Imperial" and for the Recessional JSBach's Overture to Cantata #29 "Wir Danken Dir Gott, Wir Danken Dir".

Cheers,

Corno Dolce

intet_at_tabe
Jan-15-2008, 12:08
Hi Intet,

We've already chosen the music: For the Processional we'll have William Walton's "Crown Imperial" and for the Recessional JSBach's Overture to Cantata #29 "Wir Danken Dir Gott, Wir Danken Dir".

Cheers,

Corno Dolce

Good for you Corno Dolce,

Best regards,
intet-at-tabe

hardbop grandpop
Apr-27-2010, 14:55
standards i like, lets face the music and dance-- moonglow---memories of you---blue monk--- and gloomy sunday, which is my all time favorite.stan kenton fans should listen to his version of gloomy sunday on the album the world we knew.

OLDUDE
Apr-27-2010, 23:26
Hi hbgp (How about an easier signature such as Fred or whatever),

This seems to be a somewhat old thread that you've rediscovered (previous last entry Jan 15 2008) but never mind that; as a newcomer myself it works for me.
You've got me thinking but I'll throw in something soon. (No doubt tied into your Deserted Island thread

Cheers John

Dorsetmike
Apr-28-2010, 01:11
I think What's New takes some beating, so many recorded versions, every treatment different, but most are excellent, my favourite rendering of it must be Mel Powell trio, Mel Powell, Piano: Paul Quinichette, tenor sax: and Bobby Donaldson on drums, a 9 minute track taken fairly slow and they really pull it apart and reassemble it every which way.

It's on last.fm and has been rereleased on a CD.

I think there are about 16 versions on last.fm, probably on spotify as well.

Methinks it's time I took that CD upstairs for late night listening.

OLDUDE
Apr-28-2010, 21:55
A problem I have with this theme is, are we dealing with the tunes as instrumental, vocal, orchestral and jazz, pop or whatever versions?
I can be put off a wonderful standard for life given the way they can be sometimes presented by duff artists.

However ignoring the above I agree with previous posters regarding:-
The Girl from Ipanema (especially the Stan Getz version I have);
Whats new (I first heard it by Ronny Scott);
In addition
'Round Midnight (June Christy);
Misty (Erroll Garner)

Thats for starters,
Cheers John

White Knight
Nov-14-2010, 03:59
I've been listening to "Ill Wind" from the Lee Morgan "Cornbread" CD. This has to be one of the most beautiful renditions ever done. The muted horn he uses sends it into another dimension entirely. Anybody agree?

Corno Dolce
Nov-15-2010, 13:31
Man, its a really tough one for me - After much ado methinks "McCoy Tyner plays John Coltrane" is the jazz standard for me. I believe it was recorded at the Village Vanguard. Such raw power and feeling.........

teddy
Nov-15-2010, 15:42
Round Midnight EST
St James Infirmary Blues Teagarden
Stormy Weather Lena Horne
Misty Errol Garner

I am sure I can find some more. I agree with John. You have to consider the piece, not the original artist or even composer, and then your favourite artist interpreting it.

teddy

Catrina
Nov-15-2010, 20:27
Witchi Tai To.
Stravinkski Firebird Hymn Final

gord
Nov-16-2010, 01:44
there are many standards i like, one of the best in my opinion is autumn leaves by cannonball adderley, on the album something else. gord :cool:

White Knight
Nov-30-2010, 03:57
"Willow Weep For Me" by Cannonball Adderly.:cry::tiphat:

teddy
Dec-01-2010, 15:26
Just found this on spotify Steve. One of his best I would say.

teddy

White Knight
Dec-03-2010, 04:34
Just found this on spotify Steve. One of his best I would say.


teddy

Hi Teddy :grin: Hope all is well with you and yours. I'm so glad you got to check out that song as done by Cannonball Adderly. Truly an awesome performance.:tiphat: Look forward to hearing from you again. Steve

gord
Dec-06-2010, 01:28
one of my favorite standards is, a nightingale sang in berkeley square,the version i play the most is by mark murphy on murphys first album, meet mark murphy on the decca label. it was recorded in 1955. gord

White Knight
Dec-08-2010, 03:09
Maybe not so well known as a standard, but "Ceora" by Lee Morgan is stunningly beautiful. "Ill Wind" by Morgan should also be included in this pantheon.:angel::trp:

Mat
Dec-08-2010, 22:40
Big fan of Lee Morgan, eh? :cheers:

White Knight
Dec-08-2010, 23:46
[QUOTE=Mat;117687]Big fan of Lee Morgan, eh? QUOTE]
Hi Mat and how are you? I am indeed a tremendous fan of Lee Morgan; how on earth did you guess?:rolleyes::lol::lol: What about yourself:confused: Are you familiar with any of his work and, if so, what's your take on him as both an artist and composer :confused:{" Ceora", " Sidewinder" and " Search for the New Land"} among others that he wrote. Anyway, I hope that you and yours are well and look forward to hearing from you soon. Steve. :cheers::trp:

Mat
Dec-09-2010, 02:50
Hi Steve,

Thanks for asking, I'm doing fine, though it's not been the best year for me and my close ones. Anyway, I hope you're doing okay and I keep my fingers crossed for your surgery.

No, I haven't heard any of Morgan's work before. No wait, I've just typed Sidewinder in YT and it turns out I recognised the song from the very first chords. You know, the thing with me is that if you throw a title at me I probably won't know at first, but once I get to hear the piece it becomes obvious I knew it from the beginning.

And the fact that you've mentioned Lee Morgan so many times before makes me wanna dive into his music just to see what I am missing out. I'll write a few words more after I've listened to something more than just Sidewinder.

And to answer my own question from 2007 - a lot of new favorite standards have come up, one of them being Don Grusin's She Could Be Mine (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yF-1Q4k9oWE). Absolutely delightful piece of music, and in this particular clip - the saxophone solo.

White Knight
Dec-09-2010, 04:27
Mat, that clip of the Grusins is simply awesome;I especially like the riff done by the saxophone player {Nelson Rangell is it?}, stupendous!:clap: Once I learn how to navigate and use lastfm and some other music services here, I'd like to share some Lee Morgan tracks with you. But in the meantime, if you could check out some of his work as a sideman with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, as well as his own cds Sidewinder,Cornbread and Search for the New Land I am sure you won"t be disappointed. :):trp: Anyway, look forward to hearing from you again and I'll be working some more on my computer skills.:banghead::nut:

Mat
Dec-09-2010, 20:55
If you liked the clip, then you should definately check out the album the song comes from - The Hang. I also liked the music Don's brother - Dave - composed for The Firm (a thriller movie from 1993).

White Knight
Dec-09-2010, 21:42
Mat, thanx for the 411; I definitely will check out The Hang.

gord
Dec-11-2010, 02:52
i think this thread was intended to be jazz standards written by jazz musicians, but it is now about mainly standards written by the likes of gershwin, porter,berlin and kern. i myself have been guilty of this. i pick blue monk by thelonious monk and take five by paul desmond. gord

White Knight
Dec-11-2010, 06:00
i think this thread was intended to be jazz standards written by jazz musicians, but it is now about mainly standards written by the likes of gershwin, porter,berlin and kern. i myself have been guilty of this. i pick blue monk by thelonious monk and take five by paul desmond. gord
Those are really great choices Gord.:tiphat::banana: In my book, Monk and Desmond are among the most talented and innovative practicioners of their respective instruments who are instantly identifiable from the first notes they play. :cool: steve

Mat
Dec-11-2010, 16:57
Gord, I don't mind if not-strictly-jazz pieces are discussed in this thread. It's all fine as long you don't bring up country music and such :nut:

I like this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LiQi4LZpiXk) song very much, mainly because of the lyrics. Not sure though if it was written by Cullum.

Also, is it just me or his British accent is not that apparent?

teddy
Dec-11-2010, 21:16
Yes, he does sound a bit transatlantic Mat. maybe its a bit tongue in cheek, going by the album title

teddy

White Knight
Dec-12-2010, 04:45
"Sentimental Journey" by Jackie Mclean.

gord
Dec-14-2010, 02:16
duke ellington -skin deep, i believe it was written by louis bellson. gord

White Knight
Dec-18-2010, 23:55
"Since I Fell For You", performed by Lee Morgan. :trp::bawl:A very haunting and beautiful rendition indeed.:clap::tiphat: