PDA

View Full Version : Modern popular songs based on classical music.



jason
Aug-14-2005, 02:46
I've been researching crossover music because I want to understand it better, and see how crossover is basically responsible for many of the various genres today.

I found an interesting list (http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/List-of-popular-songs-based-on-classical-music) of popular songs that are directly based on classical music compisitions.




1910s

* (1913) "Hungarian Rag" by Julius Lenzberg - based on the Second Hungarian Rhapsody by Franz Liszt.
* (1918) "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows" by Joseph McCarthy and Harry Carroll - based on the Fantasie Impromptu in C Sharp Minor by Frederic Chopin.
* (1919) "The Marine Hymn" by L. Z. Philips - based on an air from Jacques Offenbach's Genevieve de Brabant
* (1919) "Peter Gink" by George L. Cobb - based on the Peer Gynt Suite by Edvard Grieg.

1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... The Hungarian Rhapsodies, (S/G244, R106) Rapsodies hongroises or Ungarische Rhapsodien) are a set of pieces of music by Franz Liszt, originally for solo piano. ... Franz Liszt (Hungarian; Liszt Ferenc) (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) was a Hungarian virtuoso pianist and composer. ... 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The piano composition Fantaisie-Impromptu, opus 66, by Frederic Chopin, is arguably one of his most well-known pieces and one of the most famous works on classical piano. ... This article is about Frédéric Chopin, the composer. ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Marines hymn is the official hymn of the United States Marine Corps. ... Missing image Image:JacquesOffenbach. ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Peer Gynt is a play by the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. ... Edvard Hagerup Grieg (June 15, 1843–September 4, 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist. ...
1920s

* (1922) "Goin' Home" popularized by Paul Robeson - based on the "Largo" from Dvorak's Symphony No. 9, "From the New World"

1922 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... USPS Black Heritage stamp Paul LeRoy Bustill Robeson (April 9, 1898–January 23, 1976) was an American actor, athlete, singer, writer, and political and civil rights activist. ... Antonín Dvořák Antonín Leopold Dvořák listen (September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer of classical music. ... The Symphony No. ...
1930s

* (1930) "In an Eighteenth-Century Drawing Room" by Raymond Scott - based on Mozart's Piano Sonata, K. 545
* (1937) "Song of India", arr. Tommy Dorsey - based on a theme from Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade
* (1938) "My Reverie" by Larry Clinton - based on Debussy's Rêverie
* (1939) "The Lamp is Low" - Peter DeRose and Bert Shefter - based on Maurice Ravel's Pavane pour une infante défunte

1930 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Raymond Scott (September 10, 1908 - February 8, 1994), was a composer, bandleader, and inventor. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... The Piano Sonata in C major, K. 545 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is possibly his most famous piano sonata. ... 1937 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Tommy Dorsey (November 19, 1905–November 26, 1956) was a jazz trombonist in the Big Band era. ... Nikolay Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (Russian: Никола́&# 1081; Андре́е&# 1074;ич Ри́мски&# 1081;-Ко́рсак&# 1086;в), also Nikolai, Nicolai, and Rimsky-Korsakoff, (March 18, 1844 – June 21, 1908) was a Russian composer and teacher of classical music particularly noted for his fine orchestration, which may have been influenced by his synaesthesia. ... For the story teller in the Arabian Nights or the 1001 Nights see Shahrazad. ... 1938 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Claude Debussy Claude Achille Debussy (August 22, 1862 – March 25, 1918), composer of impressionistic classical music. ... 1939 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Joseph-Maurice Ravel (March 7, 1875 – December 28, 1937) was a French composer and pianist, best known for his orchestral work, Boléro, and his famous 1922 orchestral arrangement of Modest Mussorgskys Pictures at an Exhibition. ... Pavane pour une infante défunte (English: Pavane for a dead princess) is a well-known piece for solo piano written by the French composer Maurice Ravel. ...
1940s

* (1945) "Full Moon and Empty Arms", by Buddy Kaye and Ted Mossman - based on Sergei Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2.
* (1946) "Summer Moon" by Klenner, sung by Lauritz Melchior - based on Igor Stravinsky's The Firebird (Berceuse)


1950s

* (1952) "The Bigger The Figure", by Louis Prima - based on Rossini's Largo al factotum from The Barber of Seville.
* (1953) "Stranger in Paradise" by George Forrest and Robert Wright, in the Broadway musical Kismet - based on a theme from Alexander Borodin's Polovetsian Dances
* (1956) "Hot Diggity (Dog Ziggity Boom)" by Al Hoffman and Dick Manning - based on a theme from Chabrier España, Rhapsody for Orchestra
* (1958) "Catch a Falling Star" by Lee Pockriss and Paul Vance - based on a theme from Brahms' Academic Festival Overture
* (1959) "Once Upon a Dream" in the Disney movie Sleeping Beauty - based upon a waltz in Tchaikovsky's ballet Sleeping Beauty.

1952 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Louis Prima and Keely Smith singing for the radio in the 1950s Louis Prima (December 7, 1910- August 24, 1978) was an Italian-American entertainer, singer, actor, and trumpeter born New Orleans. ... Gioacchino Antonio Rossini (February 29, 1792 — November 13, 1868) was an Italian musical composer who wrote more than 30 operas as well as sacred music and chamber music. ... The Barber of Seville is a theatre play by Beaumarchais, written in 1775, and originally entitled Le Barbier de Séville in French. ... 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... There are several things which use the word Kismet: Kismet (robot) is a robot intended to demonstrate simulated emotion. ... Borodins tomb bust at Tikhvin Cemetery Alexander Porfyrevich Borodin (Алекса́& #1085;др Порфи́р&# 1100;евич Бороди́&# 1085;) (November 12, 1833 – February 27, 1887) was a Russian composer who made his living as a chemist. ... Polovtsian Dances is a part of Alexander Borodins Prince Igor suite. ... 1956 was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Al Hoffman (September 25, 1902-July 21, 1960) was a songwriter. ... Dick Manning was a songwriter, best known for his many collaborations with Al Hoffman. ... Emmanuel Alexis Chabrier (January 18, 1841 - September 13, 1894) was a French composer. ... 1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of Romantic music, who predominantly lived in Vienna, Austria. ... The Academic Festival Overture, Op. ... 1959 was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Disney empire The name Disney may refer to several aspects of the entertainment empire of The Walt Disney Company: The Walt Disney Company Walt Disney Pictures, the companys flagship motion picture studio Walt Disney Feature Animation, part of Walt Disney Pictures and The Walt Disney Company Walt Disney Studios... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky listen? (Russian: Пётр ИльиÌ�ч ЧайкоÌ�вÑ�кР¸Ð¹, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October 25, 1893 (O.S.)) was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ... Sleeping Beauty (La Belle aux bois dormant) is a fairy tale classic, the first in the set published in 1697 by Charles Perrault, Contes de ma Mère lOye (Mother Goose Tales). Elements of the story are contained in Giambattista Basiles Pentamerone (published 1634), in the tale Sun, Moon...
1960s

* (1960) "Asia Minor" by James Wisner - based on Edvard Grieg's Piano Concerto in A minor
* (1960) "It's Now Or Never" by Elvis Presley - based on O Sole Mio by di Capua.
* (1962) "Nut Rocker" by B. Bumble and the Stingers - based on Tchaikovsky's "March of the Wooden Soldiers" from the Nutcracker Suite
* (1963) "Hello Mudduh, Hello Fadduh! (A Letter From Camp)" by Allan Sherman - based on Ponchielli's "Dance of the Hours" from La Gioconda
* (1964) "Rap City" by The Ventures - based on Johannes Brahms' Hungarian Dance No. 5 in G minor
* (1965) "A Lover's Concerto" by The Toys - based on J.S. Bach's Minuet in G from the Anna Magdalena Notebook.
* (1966) "Past, Present and Future" by The Shangri-Las - based on Ludwig van Beethoven's Piano sonata No. 14, "Moonlight"
* (1967) "Imitation Situation" by Fever Tree (San Francisco Girls) - used opening passage of J.S. Bach's Toccata_and_Fugue_in_D_Minor
* (1967) "A Whiter Shade Of Pale" by Procol Harum - (loosely) based on J.S. Bach's Orchestral Suite No. 3, Air (commonly known as Air on a G String) and Cantata 140 "Sleepers Awake".
* (1968) "Because" by John Lennon - inspired by Ludwig van Beethoven's Piano sonata No. 14, "Moonlight"
* (1968) "Hall of the Mountain King" by The Who - inspired by Edvard Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite
* (1968) "Prelude B - I'm so Glad" by Deep Purple on Shades of Deep Purple - nicely lifted from Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade: The Sea and Sinbad's Ship,
* (1968) "Variations On A Theme By Erik Satie" by Blood Sweat & Tears - based on Trois Gymnopédies by Eric Satie
* (1969) "Albinoni's Adigio in G Minor" by The Doors on Boxed Set Disk 1 Without A Safety Net - based on Tomaso Albinoni's Adagio
* (1969) "Jane B" by Serge Gainsbourg for Jane Birkin - based on Frederic Chopin's "Prelude No. 4"
* (1969) "Sabre Dance" by Love Sculpture - based on Aram Khatchaturian's "Gayane"

1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Edvard Hagerup Grieg (June 15, 1843–September 4, 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist. ... The Piano Concerto in A minor by Edvard Grieg was the only concerto Grieg completed. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Elvis Presley Elvis Aaron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), also known as The King of Rock and Roll, or as just simply The King, was an American singer and actor. ... 1962 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́в&# 1089;кий, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October 25, 1893 (O.S.)) was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ... A performance of The Nutcracker The story of The Nutcracker and the Mouse King was written by E. T. A. Hoffmann. ... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh (also Faddah) is Allan Shermans best known song parody. ... Allan Sherman (sometimes incorrectly Alan), November 30, 1924 - November 20, 1973, was an American musician, parodist, satirist, accordionist, and television producer. ... Amilcare Ponchielli (August 31, 1834 _ January 17, 1886) was an Italian composer. ... 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Ventures are a surf rock band formed in 1960 and mainly active in the 1960s but they continue to perform and record right up to the present (2005). ... Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of Romantic music, who predominantly lived in Vienna, Austria. ... The Hungarian Dances by Johannes Brahms, are a set of 21 lively dance tunes based on Hungarian themes. ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... The Toys were an R&B trio, a girl group, from New York who formed in 1961 and disbanded in 1968. ... Johann Sebastian Bach, 1748 portrait by Elias Gottlob Haussmann Johann Sebastian Bach (21 March 1685 (O.S.) – 28 July 1750 (N.S.))[1] was a German composer and organist of the baroque period, and is widely acknowledged[2] as one of the greatest composers in the Western tonal tradition. ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... The Shangri-Las on the cover of a modern collection of their works. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770; died March 26, 1827) was a German composer of classical music, who predominantly lived in Vienna, Austria. ... Ludwig van Beethovens opus 27 no. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other people named Bach and other meanings of the word, see Bach (disambiguation). ... Toccata and Fugue in D Minor is the name of two different pieces by Johann Sebastian Bach: BWV 538 and BWV 565. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Whiter Shade Of Pale was released in 1967 by the band Procol Harum, and was written by Gary Brooker and Keith Reid. ... Procol Harum Procol Harum is a British progressive rock band, formed in the early 1960s. ... Johann Sebastian Bach, 1748 portrait by Elias Gottlob Haussmann Johann Sebastian Bach (21 March 1685 (O.S.) – 28 July 1750 (N.S.))[1] was a German composer and organist of the baroque period, and is widely acknowledged[2] as one of the greatest composers in the Western tonal tradition. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... John Lennon John Winston Lennon, later John Ono Lennon, (October 9, 1940–December 8, 1980), was best known as a singer, songwriter, and guitarist for The Beatles. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770; died March 26, 1827) was a German composer of classical music, who predominantly lived in Vienna, Austria. ... Ludwig van Beethovens opus 27 no. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... The Who in 1968. ... Edvard Hagerup Grieg (June 15, 1843–September 4, 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist. ... Peer Gynt is a play by the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Deep Purple is the name of a British rock group, and is also the name of a song composed by Peter De Rose, from which the band may have borrowed its name. ... Nikolay Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (Russian: Никола́&# 1081; Андре́е&# 1074;ич Ри́мски&# 1081;-Ко́рсак&# 1086;в), also Nikolai, Nicolai, and Rimsky-Korsakoff, (March 18, 1844 – June 21, 1908) was a Russian composer and teacher of classical music particularly noted for his fine orchestration, which may have been influenced by his synaesthesia. ... For the story teller in the Arabian Nights or the 1001 Nights see Shahrazad. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Blood, Sweat & Tears was an American rock and roll group formed in New York City in 1967. ... The Gymnopédies are three piano compositions by Erik Satie, which were published in Paris from 1888 on. ... Eric Alfred Leslie Satie (born Honfleur, 17 May 1866 – 1 July 1925 in Paris) was a French composer, performing pianist and publicist. ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... The Doors self-titled debut (1967) The Doors (formed in 1965 in Los Angeles, California) were a popular and influential American rock band. ... Tomaso Albinoni (June 14, 1671, Venice, Italy – January 17, 1751, Venice) was an Italian baroque composer. ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... Serge Gainsbourg Serge Gainsbourg, born Lucien Ginzburg, (April 2, 1928 – March 2, 1991) was a poet, singer-songwriter, actor and director. ... Jane Birkin (b. ... This article is about Frédéric Chopin, the composer. ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... This article is about the dance involving swords - for the uncontrollable upward movement of the F-86 Sabre: see Sabre dance The Sabre Dance is a movement in the final act of Aram Khachaturians ballet Gayane, completed in 1942. ... Love Sculpture were a British blues-rock band of the late 60s, led by Dave Edmunds. ... Aram Ilich Khachaturian (Armenian: Արամ Խաչատրյ& #1377;ն, Russian: Аpaм Ильич Xaчaтypян) (June 6, 1903 – May 1, 1978) was a composer of classical music. ... Gayane (sometimes written Gayaneh) is a ballet composed by Aram Khachaturian in 1942. ...
1970s

* (1970) "Knife Edge" by Emerson, Lake and Palmer - based on Sinfonietta, first movement by Leos Janacek
* (1970) "A Song of Joy" by Waldo De Los Rios for Miguel Rios - based on Beethoven's Ninth Symphony
* (1971) "Baby Alone In Babylone" by Serge Gainsbourg for Jane Birkin - based on the 3rd movement of Brahms's Symphony No. 3
* (1972) "Abaddon's Bolero" by Emerson, Lake and Palmer - based on Boléro by Maurice Ravel
* (1972) "Also Sprach Zarathustra" [i] by Deodato - a funk arrangement of Richard Strauss' composition of the same name
* (1972) "Cans and Brahms" by Yes - based on Johannes Brahms Symphony No. 4, third movement
* (1972) "Hoedown" by Emerson, Lake and Palmer - based on Rodeo by Aaron Copland
* (1972) "Horizons" by Steve Hackett from Genesis on Foxtrot - (loosely) based on Suite For Cello, by J.S. Bach
* (1972) "Pictures at an Exhibition" by Emerson, Lake and Palmer - entire album based on the work by Modest Mussorgsky
* (1972) "Song Sung Blue" by Neil Diamond - based on Mozart's "Piano Concerto No. 21", second movement
* (1973) "Joybringer" by Manfred Mann's Earth Band - based on "Jupiter - bringer of jollity" from Gustav Holst's The Planets suite
* (1973) "Toccata" by Emerson, Lake and Palmer - based on Ginastera's First piano concerto, fourth movement
* (1974) "Annie's Song" by John Denver - based on Peter Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 5, second movement
* (1974) "Minuetto Allegretto" by The Wombles - based on Mozart's "Symphony No. 41"
* (1974) "Voices of Syn" by Klaus Schulze on Timewind - incorporates a collage of Verdi songs sung by an operatic singer.
* (1975) "Could It Be Magic" by Barry Manilow - quotes extensively from Chopin's Prelude in C minor
* (1975) "Fanfare for the Common Man" by Emerson, Lake and Palmer - based on Aaron Copland's work of the same name.
* (1975) "I Believe in Father Christmas" by Emerson, Lake and Palmer - based on Lieutenant Kije Suite, Opus 60, by Sergei Prokofiev (released as a single under the name of Greg Lake alone).
* (1976) "All By Myself" by Eric Carmen - based on Sergei Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2
* (1976) "A Fifth of Beethoven" [i] by Walter Murphy - disco version of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, featured in Saturday Night Fever
* (1976) "Ma Lou Marilou" by Serge Gainsbourg - based on the 1st movement of Beethoven's

Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor "Appassionata" (opus 57) 1970 was a common year starting on Thursday. ... ELP can also stand for Extra Long Play, a format for the VCR tape. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... 1970 was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... The Symphony No. ... 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... Serge Gainsbourg Serge Gainsbourg, born Lucien Ginzburg, (April 2, 1928 – March 2, 1991) was a poet, singer-songwriter, actor and director. ... Jane Birkin (b. ... Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of classical music. ... Johannes Brahms Symphony No. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... ELP can also stand for Extra Long Play, a format for the VCR tape. ... The Bolero by Maurice Ravel is one of his most famous pieces of music. ... Joseph-Maurice Ravel (March 7, 1875 – December 28, 1937) was a French composer and pianist, best known for his orchestral work, Boléro, and his famous 1922 orchestral arrangement of Modest Mussorgskys Pictures at an Exhibition. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... Eumir Deodato is a Brazilian funk artist and pop producer. ... Funk is a distinct style of music originated by African-Americans, e. ... Richard Strauss (June 11, 1864 – September 8, 1949) was a German composer of the late Romantic era, particularly noted for his tone poems and operas. ... Also sprach Zarathustra is a symphonic poem by Richard Strauss, composed in 1896 and inspired by the book of the same title by Friedrich Nietzsche. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... Yes in concert in Indianapolis in 1977 (left to right, Steve Howe, Alan White, Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Rick Wakeman) The popular music group Yes is a progressive rock band that formed in London in 1968. ... Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of Romantic music, who predominantly lived in Vienna, Austria. ... The Symphony No. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... ELP can also stand for Extra Long Play, a format for the VCR tape. ... Aaron Copland Aaron Copland (November 14, 1900 – December 2, 1990) was an American composer of modern tonal music as well as film music. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... Steve Hackett (born February 12, 1950) is a virtuoso guitar player. ... Genesis is a progressive rock group that was formed in 1967 when founding members Peter Gabriel, Mike Rutherford, and Tony Banks were still students at Charterhouse School. ... Johann Sebastian Bach, 1748 portrait by Elias Gottlob Haussmann Johann Sebastian Bach (21 March 1685 (O.S.) – 28 July 1750 (N.S.))[1] was a German composer and organist of the baroque period, and is widely acknowledged[2] as one of the greatest composers in the Western tonal tradition. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... ELP can also stand for Extra Long Play, a format for the VCR tape. ... Pictures at an Exhibition is a famous suite of musical pieces, composed - originally for piano - by Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky and first published in 1874. ... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Russian: МодеÌ�Ñ�т ПетроÌ�вич МуÌ�Ñ�оргÑ� кий) (March 21, 1839 – March 28, 1881; sometimes spelled Modeste Moussorgsky), was an innovative Russian composer famed for his colourful, exotic, and lush orchestral pieces dedicated to various subjects of medieval Russian history. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... Essential Neil Diamond album cover. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... 1973 was a common year starting on Monday. ... Cock-A-Hoop Groovin Manfred Mann was a British R&B and pop band of the 1960s, named after the keyboard player. ... Gustav Holst Gustavus Theodore von Holst (September 21, 1874 – May 25, 1934) was an English composer with Latvian (and some Spanish) roots. ... The Planets (also known as The Planets Suite), opus 32, is an orchestral suite by the English composer Gustav Holst. ... 1973 was a common year starting on Monday. ... ELP can also stand for Extra Long Play, a format for the VCR tape. ... Alberto Evaristo Ginastera (April 11, 1916 – June 25, 1983) was an Argentinian composer of classical music. ... 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... John Denver John Denver (December 31, 1943 – October 12, 1997), born Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́в&# 1089;кий, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October 25, 1893 (O.S.)) was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ... Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky composed his Symphony No. ... 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... This article refers to the childrens TV programme, not the radical anarchist WOMBLES group. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... Klaus Schulze (born August 4, 1947) is a German electronic musician. ... Giuseppe Verdi, by Giovanni Boldini, 1886 (National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome) Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (October 10, 1813 – January 27, 1901) was one of the great composers of Italian opera. ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... Barry Manilow in 1990 Barry Manilow (born Barry Alan Pincus in Brooklyn, New York on June 17, 1943) is an American singer and songwriter. ... This article is about Frédéric Chopin, the composer. ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... Fanfare for the Common Man is a famous piece of orchestral music. ... ELP can also stand for Extra Long Play, a format for the VCR tape. ... Aaron Copland Aaron Copland (November 14, 1900 – December 2, 1990) was an American composer of modern tonal music as well as film music. ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... ELP can also stand for Extra Long Play, a format for the VCR tape. ... Lieutenant Kije is a film so poor that it is remembered only because of its music, which was the first instance of Sergei Prokofievs new simplicity. ... Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Russian: ) (April 271, 1891 – March 5, 1953) was a Russian composer who mastered numerous musical genres and came to be admired as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. ... Greg Lake in concert with Emerson, Lake and Palmer in the early 1970s. ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Eric Carmen is an American singer, songwriter, guitarist and keyboardist, born in Cleveland, Ohio. ... Rachmaninoff, from a 1921 Victor advertisement Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff (April 1, 1873 – March 28, 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs Piano Concerto No. ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Walter Murphy Walter Murphy (born December 19, 1952) is a pianist, composer, and arranger who had a massive hit with the instrumental, A Fifth of Beethoven, a disco adaption of Beethovens Fifth Symphony, in 1976, when disco was at the height of its popularity. ... Disco is an up-tempo style of dance music (generally between 110 and 136 beats per minute) that originated in the early 1970s, mainly from funk and soul music, popular with audiences in larger cities all over the world, and derives its name from the French word discothèque (meaning... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770; died March 26, 1827) was a German composer of classical music, who predominantly lived in Vienna, Austria. ... Ludwig van Beethovens Symphony No. ... Saturday Night Fever Movie Poster Saturday Night Fever is a 1977 movie starring John Travolta as Tony Manero, a troubled Brooklyn youth whose weekend activities are dominated by visits to a New York discotheque. ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Serge Gainsbourg Serge Gainsbourg, born Lucien Ginzburg, (April 2, 1928 – March 2, 1991) was a poet, singer-songwriter, actor and director. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Ludwig van Beethovens Piano Sonata No. ...

* (1976) "Never Gonna Fall In Love Again" by Eric Carmen - based on Rachmaninoff's Second Symphony
* (1977) "If I Had Words" by Scott Fitzgerald and Yvonne Keeley - based on Camille Saint-Saëns' Symphony No. 3 ("Organ Symphony")
* (1977) "Rockaria" by The Electric Light Orchestra - based on "Un Bel Di" from Puccini's "Madame Butterfly"
* (1978) "Lady Linda" by The Beach Boys - based on J.S. Bach's Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring
* (1979) "If I Had You" by The Korgis - based on Rachmaninov's "Variations on a theme by Paganini" Variation 18, based on Paganini's "Caprice No 24 in A minor"

1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Eric Carmen is an American singer, songwriter, guitarist and keyboardist, born in Cleveland, Ohio. ... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff, also Sergey Rachmaninov or Serge Rakhmaninov (Серге́&#1081 ; Васи́ль&# 1077;вич Рахма́н&# 1080;нов), (April 1, 1873 – March 28, 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... 1977 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1977 calendar). ... F.Scott Fitzgerald, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 - December 21, 1940), was a Jazz Age novelist and short story writer. ... Charles Camille Saint-Saëns (IPA: [ʃaÊ�l. ... The Symphony No. ... 1977 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1977 calendar). ... Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) was a successful Birmingham rock music group of the 1970s and 1980s. ... Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) is regarded as one of the great operatic composers of the late 19th and early 20th century. ... 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... The Beach Boys, 1963 (L to R, David Marks, Carl Wilson, Dennis Wilson, Mike Love, Brian Wilson) The Beach Boys are a pop music group formed in Hawthorne, California in 1961, whose popularity has lasted into the twenty-first century. ... Johann Sebastian Bach, 1748 portrait by Elias Gottlob Haussmann Johann Sebastian Bach (21 March 1685 (O.S.) – 28 July 1750 (N.S.))[1] was a German composer and organist of the baroque period, and is widely acknowledged[2] as one of the greatest composers in the Western tonal tradition. ... 1979 is a common year starting on Monday. ... The Korgis The Korgis was a British pop band that had their biggest hit with the single Everybodys Got to Learn Sometime in 1980. ... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff, also Sergey Rachmaninov or Serge Rakhmaninov (Серге́&#1081 ; Васи́ль&# 1077;вич Рахма́н&# 1080;нов), (April 1, 1873 – March 28, 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. ... Niccolò Paganini Niccolò Paganini, (Genoa, October 27, 1782 - Nice, May 27, 1840) was a violinist and composer. ...
1980s

* (1980) "Swan Lake" by Madness - based on Tchaikovsky's "Swan Lake"
* (1980) "Toccata" by Sky - based on Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D Minor
* (1981) "Can Can" by Bad Manners - a manic ska version of the Can-Can from Offenbach's "Orpheus in the Underworld"
* (1981) "Difficult to Cure" by Rainbow - based on Beethoven's "Ode to Joy" (last movement of the ninth symphony).
* (1983) "This Night" by Billy Joel - adapted from Beethoven's Pathétique Sonata
* (1984) "Icarus Dream Suite" by Yngwie J. Malmsteen - based on Tomaso Albinoni's, Adagio.
* (1984) "Madame Butterfly" by Malcolm McLaren and the World Famous Supreme Team - based on Giacomo Puccini's opera Madame Butterfly.
* (1984) "Rite of Spring" by Birdsongs of the Mesozoic - based on Igor Stravinsky's work of the same name
* (1985) "Lemon Incest" by Serge Gainsbourg for Charlotte Gainsbourg - based on Frederic Chopin's "Étude No. 3 in E (Tristesse)" (in opus 10)
* (1986) "Russians" by Sting - based on "Romance" theme from Lieutenant Kije Suite, Opus 60, by Sergei Prokofiev
* (1987) "Lost Song" by Serge Gainsbourg for Jane Birkin - melody after part of Edvard Grieg's "Solveig's song" (in Peer Gynt, Suite No. 2, opus 55)
* (1989) "And So It Goes" by Billy Joel is based on the hymn Jerusalem by Charles Hubert Parry.
* (1989) "Leningrad" by Billy Joel - quotes at length the song Waldesnacht, du wunderkühle by Johannes Brahms
* (1989) "Rose of Pain" by X Japan - takes much of its melody from Johann Sebastian Bach's "Little Fugue" in G Minor

1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Album cover of One Step Beyond Madness were a British ska band of the 1980s. ... Swan Lake (Russian: Лебединое Озеро) is one of the most famous and critically-acclaimed ballets, with music by Tchaikovsky. ... 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Sky was an English based progressive rock band, formed in 1978 when classical guitarist John Williams decided to team up with Herbie Flowers, Francis Monkman, Tristan Fry and Kevin Peek. ... Johann Sebastian Bach, 1748 portrait by Elias Gottlob Haussmann Johann Sebastian Bach (21 March 1685 (O.S.) – 28 July 1750 (N.S.))[1] was a German composer and organist of the baroque period, and is widely acknowledged[2] as one of the greatest composers in the Western tonal tradition. ... Toccata and Fugue in D Minor is the name of two different pieces by Johann Sebastian Bach: BWV 538 and BWV 565. ... 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bad Manners were a second wave or Two Tone English Beat ska band. ... This page is about ska, the musical style. ... Offenbach holds many meanings. ... Orphée aux enfers is an operetta in two acts by Jacques Offenbach. ... 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1982 lineup of rainbow Rainbow was a British power metal band that formed in 1974. ... The ode To Joy (Ode »An die Freude« in German) is an ode written in 1785 by the German poet and historian Friedrich Schiller, and known especially for its musical setting by Beethoven in the fourth and final movement of his Ninth Symphony, for four solo voices, chorus, and orchestra. ... The Symphony No. ... 1983 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Billy Joel was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1999. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Ludwig van Beethovens Piano Sonata No. ... 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Yngwie J. Malmsteen Yngwie J. Malmsteen (born Lars Johan Yngve Lannerbäck, June 30, 1963) is a guitarist from Sweden who achieved widespread acclaim in the 1980s due to his technical proficiency and fusion of classical music elements with heavy rock guitar. ... Tomaso Albinoni (June 14, 1671, Venice, Italy – January 17, 1751, Venice) was an Italian baroque composer. ... 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Malcolm McLaren (born January 22, 1946) is an impresario and self-publicist who was the manager of the punk rock band the Sex Pistols. ... Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) is regarded as one of the great operatic composers of the late 19th and early 20th century. ... Madama Butterfly (or sometimes Madame Butterfly in English) is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini, set in Japan. ... 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Birdsongs of the Mesozoic is a musical group founded in Boston, Massachusetts in 1983. ... Igor Fyodorovitch Stravinsky (Russian: ) (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a Russian-American composer of modern classical music. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Serge Gainsbourg Serge Gainsbourg, born Lucien Ginzburg, (April 2, 1928 – March 2, 1991) was a poet, singer-songwriter, actor and director. ... Charlotte Gainsbourg, daughter of French poet and singer, Serge Gainsbourg and actress Jane Birkin, was born on July 22, 1971 in London. ... This article is about Frédéric Chopin, the composer. ... 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sting circa 1987 Gordon Matthew Sumner, OBE (born October 2, 1951), best known by his stage name Sting, is an English musician and formerly bassist and lead singer of The Police. ... Lieutenant Kije is a film so poor that it is remembered only because of its music, which was the first instance of Sergei Prokofievs new simplicity. ... Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Russian: ) (April 271, 1891 – March 5, 1953) was a Russian composer who mastered numerous musical genres and came to be admired as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. ... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Serge Gainsbourg Serge Gainsbourg, born Lucien Ginzburg, (April 2, 1928 – March 2, 1991) was a poet, singer-songwriter, actor and director. ... Jane Birkin (b. ... Edvard Hagerup Grieg (June 15, 1843–September 4, 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist. ... Peer Gynt is a play by the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Billy Joel was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1999. ... And did those feet in ancient time is a poem by William Blake from the preface to his work Milton: a Poem (1804). ... Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (February 27, 1848 – October 7, 1918) was an English composer, probably best known for his setting of William Blakes poem, Jerusalem. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Billy Joel was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1999. ... Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of Romantic music, who predominantly lived in Vienna, Austria. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... X Japan, or X which was their initial name, was a Japanese Visual kei band, the brainchild of Yoshiki (Yoshiki Hayashi). ... Johann Sebastian Bach, 1748 portrait by Elias Gottlob Haussmann Johann Sebastian Bach (21 March 1685 (O.S.) – 28 July 1750 (N.S.))[1] was a German composer and organist of the baroque period, and is widely acknowledged[2] as one of the greatest composers in the Western tonal tradition. ...
1990s

* (1990) "Mea Culpa" by Enigma - based on the Gregorian chant "Kyrie Eleison"
* (1990) "Operaa House!" by Malcolm McLaren and the World Famous Supreme Team - based on the "Flower Duet" from Léo Delibes' opera Lakmé
* (1991) "World In Union" by Kiri Te Kanawa (official theme song of the Rugby Union World Cup) - based on "I Vow to Thee, My Country" from Holst's The Planets Suite, opus 32, Jupiter, Bringer of Jollity (also covered by Ladysmith Black Mambazo (1995) and Shirley Bassey/Bryn Terfel (1999))
* (1994) "Basket Case" by Green Day - based on Johann Pachelbel's Canon in D Major
* (1995) "Clubbed to Death" [i] by Rob Dougan on Furious Angels - parts inspired by Edward Elgar's Enigma Variations
* (1996) "Clubbed to Death 2" [i] by Rob Dougan on Furious Angels - parts quoting Frederic Chopin's "Prelude No. 4 in E minor" (in Preludes, opus 28)
* (1997) "Tubthumper" by Chumbawamba - quotes Jeremiah Clarke's Trumpet Voluntary.
* (1998) "Everything's Gonna Be Alright" by Sweetbox - based on Johann Sebastian Bach, Air from the Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D major
* (1999) "Arpeggios From Hell" reworked/renamed "Molto Arpeggiosa" by Yngwie J. Malmsteen - based on Beethoven's Piano sonata No. 14, "Moonlight", 3rd movement
* (1999) "Barber's Adagio for Strings" by William Orbit - a techno/electronic version of Samuel Barber's "Adagio for Strings"
* (1999) "Love of my Life" from Supernatural by Santana and Dave Matthews - based on the third movement from Johannes Brahms's Symphony No. 3

1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Cretu and his wife Sandra Enigma is a musical project started by Michael Cretu and his wife Sandra Cretu in 1990. ... Kyrie is a Greek word that means Lord or Oh, Lord. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Malcolm McLaren (born January 22, 1946) is an impresario and self-publicist who was the manager of the punk rock band the Sex Pistols. ... (Clément Philibert) Léo Delibes (February 21, 1836 – January 16, 1891) was a French composer of Romantic music. ... Lakmé is an opera in three acts by Léo Delibes to a French libretto by Edmond Gondinet and Philippe Gille, based on the novel Rarahu ou Le Mariage de Loti by Pierre Loti. ... 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kiri Te Kanawa Dame Kiri Te Kanawa ONZ DBE AO (March 6, 1944), is a well-known New Zealand opera singer of Maori ancestry. ... The Rugby World Cup is the premier international Rugby Union contest in the world, first held jointly in Australia and New Zealand in 1987 and now held every four years. ... I Vow to Thee, My Country is an English patriotic song and Anglican hymn. ... Gustav Holst Gustavus Theodore von Holst (September 21, 1874 – May 25, 1934) was an English composer with Latvian (and some Spanish) roots. ... Ladysmith Black Mambazo is a chorus from South Africa that is noted for singing a cappella mbube music. ... Shirley Bassey in 2000 Dame Shirley Bassey (born January 8, 1937), is a Welsh singer, perhaps best known for performing the theme songs to the James Bond films Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever (1971), and Moonraker (1979). ... The Welsh baritone Bryn Terfel (born November 9, 1965) is one of the best-known contemporary opera and concert singers. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... Green Day is a pop punk band consisting of Billie Joe Armstrong (lead vocals, guitar), Mike Dirnt (bass, backing vocals, born Michael Ryan Pritchard), and Tré Cool (drummer, born Frank Edwin Wright III). ... Johann Pachelbel (päkhəlbĕl) (August 1653 – March 3, 1706) was a German baroque composer and organist, best remembered for his Canon in D. Pachelbel was organist at Erfurt, in the Thuringian region of Germany. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Furious Angels, released in 2003, is the first album by Rob Dougan. ... Rob Dougan in 2003 for the promotion of his debut album Furious Angels Rob Dougan, who started as Rob D, is a genre-blending music composer mixing the sound of orchestral film music, the beat of club Trip Hop, and bluesy vocals, only tangentially relatable to electronic music. ... Furious Angels, released in 2003, is the first album by Rob Dougan. ... Edward Elgar Sir Edward William Elgar, Bt OM GCVO (June 2, 1857 – February 23, 1934) was a British composer, born in the small village of Lower Broadheath outside Worcester, Worcestershire, to William Elgar, a piano tuner and music dealer, and his wife Ann. ... Variations on an Original Theme for orchestra, op. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Furious Angels, released in 2003, is the first album by Rob Dougan. ... Rob Dougan in 2003 for the promotion of his debut album Furious Angels Rob Dougan, who started as Rob D, is a genre-blending music composer mixing the sound of orchestral film music, the beat of club Trip Hop, and bluesy vocals, only tangentially relatable to electronic music. ... Furious Angels, released in 2003, is the first album by Rob Dougan. ... This article is about Frédéric Chopin, the composer. ... 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chumbawamba performing at Guildford Live 2001 Chumbawamba are a band from the UK who use their music to promote anarchist ideas. ... Jeremiah Clarke (1674 - July 16, 1707) was an English composer, now best remembered for the popular keyboard piece attributed to him, the Prince of Denmarks March, commonly called the Trumpet Voluntary and attributed for a long time to Henry Purcell. ... 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Jade Villalon from Sweetbox Sweetbox, a German pop group, was formed in 1995, by producer Geo. ... Johann Sebastian Bach, 1748 portrait by Elias Gottlob Haussmann Johann Sebastian Bach (21 March 1685 (O.S.) – 28 July 1750 (N.S.))[1] was a German composer and organist of the baroque period, and is widely acknowledged[2] as one of the greatest composers in the Western tonal tradition. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Yngwie J. Malmsteen Yngwie J. Malmsteen (born Lars Johan Yngve Lannerbäck, June 30, 1963) is a guitarist from Sweden who achieved widespread acclaim in the 1980s due to his technical proficiency and fusion of classical music elements with heavy rock guitar. ... Ludwig van Beethovens opus 27 no. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... William Orbit 1999 William Orbit (born 1956 as William Wainwright) is a British musician and record producer, best known to the public for producing Madonnas album Ray of Light. ... Techno- is a prefix relating to technology. ... Samuel Barber, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1944 Samuel Osborne Barber (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981) was an American composer of classical music best known for his Adagio for Strings. ... Adagio for Strings is a piece of classical music for string orchestra by Samuel Barber. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Supernatural is a 1999 concept album by Santana. ... Santana during concert in Barcelona 2003 Carlos Santana (born July 20, 1947) is a famous Mexican rock and roll guitarist, originally from Autlan de Navarro, Jalisco. ... Dave Matthews, 2003 Dave Matthews (born January 9, 1967 in Johannesburg, South Africa) is the vocalist and guitarist from Dave Matthews Band. ... Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of Romantic music, who predominantly lived in Vienna, Austria. ... Johannes Brahms Symphony No. ...
2000s

* (2000) "Graduation (Friends Forever)" by Vitamin C - based on Johann Pachelbel's Canon in D Major
* (2000) "Hall of the Mountain King" [i] by Apocalyptica - cello/metal cover of Edvard Grieg's Peer Gynt (Suite No.1, opus 46)
* (2000) "Love U Crazay" by En Vogue from Masterpiece Theatre - set to Tchaikovsky's "Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" from Nutcracker
* (2000) "Those Dogs" by En Vogue from Masterpiece Theatre - set to Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata.
* (2001) "Black, Black Heart" by David Usher from Morning Orbit - containing Léo Delibes' "The Flower Duet" from Lakmé
* (2001) "Piano & I" by Alicia Keys - based on Beethoven's Piano sonata No. 14, "Moonlight", 1st movement
* (2001) "Someone to Call My Lover" by Janet Jackson - uses Erik Satie's Gymnopedie No. 1 (as well as America's "Ventura Highway").
* (2001) "Yatta" by Happa-tai - based on Johann Pachelbel's Canon in D Major
* (2002) "I Can" by Nas - contains a sample of the classical piece Fur Elise by Beethoven.
* (2002) "Symphony in X Major" by Xzibit - based largely on a (minor key) section Johann Sebastian Bach's Third Brandenburg Concerto
* (2003) "When I Get You Alone" by Thicke - based on a sample from Walter Murphy's "A Fifth of Beethoven" (q.v.) - itself based on Beethoven's Fifth Symphony
* (2003) "Karma" by Alicia Keys - contains a sample from Johannes Brahms' Violin Concerto
* (2004) "Paris" by Delerium - based on Johann Pachelbel's Canon in D Major
* (2005) "They" by Jem - largely based on Prelude 12 from J. S. Bach's The Well-tempered Clavier (Book 2)




I find the more modern music interesting because I'm not really aware of some of the earlier music on this list (1910s, 1920s, etc.).

I'm posting this list here because I hope someone here can find it interesting and beneficial as I have in understanding the evolution of popular music better.

Rune Vejby
Aug-14-2005, 12:19
Nice post, Jason.

It's funny to see such a list, but I was shocked when I saw that Delerium - Paris was based on Canon by Johan Pachelbell... as I remember Paris it is not based on Canon but maybe I will have to double-check.

I actually like the idea of mixing classical music with modern music as it can add some complexity to the often rather monotone and predictable sound of the modern stuff.
But it is not always that the adaption of the classical music is succesfull. Nas - I can (based on Für Elise) is, in my opinion, one of the worst rap-beats I have ever come across.

But if you want to hear a good track with samples from classical music, I would recommend Lamb - Angelica, based on Debussy's Clair de Lune... It is amazing how well they adapt the piano music to a very modern trip hop beat.... The only problem is that Debussy's name is not written anywhere (not even on the inside of the album over!) so he will not get any credit!!! https://www.magle.dk/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/frown.gif

jason
Aug-14-2005, 21:09
^ That's what makes me sick. Not giving credit to someone who inspired your song (you more or less "stole" it then). I see this a lot in hip-hop and rap. One band that I see this happen with a lot is Led Zeppelin. They never seem to get credit for the many songs who have used Zeppelinesque samples.

Gongchime
Sep-15-2005, 10:49
Yeah, nice post. I remember being aware that Eric Carmen's All By Myself was Rachmaninoff but I wasn't cognizant of many of the others.

Gongchime

rojo
Apr-05-2006, 06:43
I wonder, would Jack Fina`s 'Bumble Boogie' (based on Rimsky-Korsakov`s 'The Flight of the Bumblebee') count as a popular song?...:)

Izabella
Apr-06-2006, 13:24
Hi there...

I just wanted to say that there is an crossover artist that gives credit to the original composer,actually he did'n even change the names of the pieces and they are still popular in clubs everywhere,especially in croatia(maybe becouse he's croatian:) )

Anyway,his name is Maxim Mrvica,and his first crossover album is named "the piano player".He's very popular in Japan,lives in London....
I was on his concert last summer,I have to admit that I heard better as well as worse,but the album is great.
Some of the pieces are:The flight of the bumblebee
Grieg's piano concert in a-minor
Handell's sarabande
Rhapsody on a theme of Paganini
Chopin's revolutionary etude in c-minor
etc.
Maybe you'll like it...

Yours truly

fournotes
Sep-27-2006, 14:09
^ That's what makes me sick. Not giving credit to someone who inspired your song (you more or less "stole" it then). I see this a lot in hip-hop and rap. One band that I see this happen with a lot is Led Zeppelin. They never seem to get credit for the many songs who have used Zeppelinesque samples.
Heh, of course Led Zeppelin heavily, uh, "appropriated" other blues and pop music without giving credit (unless sued). Not picking on the band, but it's funny to see them mentioned as not getting credit for something ;)

As for the OP, John Lennon said the melody and chord changes in the Beatles "Because" was based on Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata". He heard Yoko playing it on the piano, and morphed it and switched it around.

Museo
Sep-29-2006, 15:44
Wow - that is some list Jason and must have taken quite a while to research.

From the sound of it I always think that "The Bittersweet Symphony" by The Verve should be based on a classical music piece but I think it is actually based on a Rolling Stones tune. Does anyone know which one ?

SecondBass
Sep-29-2006, 15:48
Bittersweet Symphony is based on The Last Time by The Rolling Stones. Apparently, it was a sample of an obscure orchestral recording and the old Stones' manager, Allen Klein, received lots of royalties on the back of it as he owned the publishing rights.

Naked Planet
Oct-17-2006, 18:20
Well, Dirty Funka sure had lots of fun with Zeppelin's 'Immigrant Song.' But what he did was as much a homage as anything else.

As far as Zep's blues plagairizing goes, it's just part of a long tradition. Blues music is largely derivative & bluesmen were in the habit of borrowing each others guitar licks anyway. Also, many blues legends have passed away & tracking down surviving relatives or estates (if any) must be tricky. Page/Plant once met with the widow of one such bluesman, with the intention of paying her personally in lieu of royalties; she scoffed at the thousands they offered & demanded substantially more. Very offputting for the pair.

altas
Nov-14-2006, 04:58
Here is my first post! Nice list!

I know more... The Nederland DJ Tiesto also remade some classical songs into trance (I don't know what are exactly names of classical songs):

Addagio for strings
Forever today
Euphoria, etc.

Sybarite
Dec-23-2006, 21:03
^ That's what makes me sick. Not giving credit to someone who inspired your song (you more or less "stole" it then)...

Ah, good old plaigarism. Still, if it was good enough for Shakespeare and JRR Tolkein... ;)

cessy
Jan-03-2007, 04:49
Thanks for the list. We should not really forget about our classics because we will look back into it one way or another. I just hope that they will be given proper credits.

Art Rock
Jan-10-2007, 13:46
Nice list. Main names missing are the bands Ekseption and Renaissance.

Farrahcat
Jan-20-2007, 13:49
Anyway,his name is Maxim Mrvica,and his first crossover album is named "the piano player".He's very popular in Japan,lives in London....


Are you talking about Maksim? He visited our country so I was able to watch his concert. I am piano player myself.


Yeah, nice post. I remember being aware that Eric Carmen's All By Myself was Rachmaninoff

I never knew that “All by Myself” was based on Sergei Rachmaninoff's work. How could I not know that? Classical music still rocks!



Anyway, this is a very nice and informative post Jason. Thank you very much!

Cobalt
Feb-03-2007, 00:34
Very interesting post - I for one have been busy listening to a few of the tracks listed and much to my surprise I can hear the similarities despite having heard many of these before and not batted an eyelid.

As for basing work on somebody elses, I think that everybody is guilty of that to an extent. With so much time having passed and so much music composed, I'm pretty certain that everyone has gotten inspiration from elsewhere at one time or another. As long as the similarities aren't too uncanny then I suppose you're likely to go largely un-noticed... until lists like this pop up from time to time anyway :)

Miz_ai
Feb-10-2007, 13:05
i know that all by myself was rach concerto no2, i was listening to this concerto when i think that the melodies remind me of a pop song , eventually i have this all bu myself sang by celine dion.. it's really the same XD;;; some part of it.. esp with the second movt

StuckOnBandaid
Feb-11-2007, 06:46
This was a great post! I'm not surprised to see that Alicia Keys has bits and pieces of classical music in her work because she's a trained classical piano player. Like you jason, I'm more familiar with the newer songs, and have found this post really interesting.


* (2001) "Black, Black Heart" by David Usher from Morning Orbit - containing Léo Delibes' "The Flower Duet" from Lakmé

I was really surprised to see this song on this list. David Usher is an incredibly talented guy, and I've listened to him since he was in his band 'Moist'. This is an excellent song and if any of you are interested in more softer rock/adult contemporary, you should check it out.

Kaizen
Feb-11-2007, 19:40
Wow, what an absolutely amazing list, I had no idea that so many current songs sampled old classical music. Two songs of interest are "Lacrymosa" & "Anything for you" by Evanescence. Both of these songs takes Mozart's Requiem and samples them into something you would have to hear to believe.

Jeffrey Hall
Feb-18-2007, 04:51
That is quite a list indeed!

One that might be added... Separate Ways, from the album Frontiers (1982), by Journey, opens with a quote from Bach's "Little" G minor fugue, BWV 578. Just in case anybody was interested. :D

lofisamuri
Mar-08-2007, 22:17
This is an incredible list! I'm going through my iPod now and listening again for the first time. lol.

Great post - thank you for the wealth of info.

methodistgirl
Dec-06-2007, 01:07
I wonder, would Jack Fina`s 'Bumble Boogie' (based on Rimsky-Korsakov`s 'The Flight of the Bumblebee') count as a popular song?...:)
I used to have Neil Diamond's version Bumble Boogie on his You Don't
bring me flowers album. Look it up!
judy tooley

Corno Dolce
Dec-06-2007, 08:23
*I Will Never Fall In Love Again* - based on the 3rd movement of Rachmaninoff's 2nd Symphony.

ses
Jan-18-2008, 11:53
Bernstein's lovely "Somewhere" from West Side Story, must be based from the adagio of Beethoven's 5th piano concerto. When "steeling" is done so spirited and lovely and respectfull I love it.

Wonderfull list Mr. Jason

Muza
Jan-18-2008, 21:38
oh, so many... I cant even recall them right now. Well, the latest one that I heard was, I think by Celine Dion, and it samples Vivaldi's Four Seasons (I may be wrong).

Does anyone know what I am talking about, I'd love to know the name of that song...

mattbanx
Jan-23-2008, 09:54
A lot more in pop set to classical pieces than I thoght.

Half the songs I grew up loving it seems were some obscure or forgotten cover.
Jimmy Page sure was inventive, whereever he got is influences from.
Still remember him playing his axe like a violin on Kashmir.
I always thought Led Zeppelin to be more than just a metal band.

All music seems to be copped or borrowed from somewhere.
I like some orchastral rock also with a lot of stiring sound and other acoustical instruments.
I wonder how many times some classical piece is stumbled upon in that when writing.

Serassi1836
Jan-30-2008, 16:38
Introduction of "Atom heart mother" by Pink Floyd is a Bach's Prelude.
Introduction of "La canzone dell'amore perduto" (the song of the lost love) by F. de Andrè is taken from the Trumpet Concert by Telemann and a theme of "La Collina" (the hill) by the same Italian singer is Chopin's.
In jazz music there are gregorian modes.

methodistgirl
Feb-04-2008, 23:29
You never thought of Bon Jovi's slippery when wet's first song as being
a piece written by Beethoven. Not to mention the group Electric Light
Orchestra doing a lot of their music based on Beetoven and Paccini.
I hope I spelled that right. The Moody blues did an album called Days
of Future Passed that was supposed to the the answer to Divozak's
New world symphony.
judy tooley

C5Says
Feb-07-2008, 00:43
Hi there...

I just wanted to say that there is an crossover artist that gives credit to the original composer,actually he did'n even change the names of the pieces and they are still popular in clubs everywhere,especially in croatia(maybe becouse he's croatian:) )

Anyway,his name is Maxim Mrvica,and his first crossover album is named "the piano player".He's very popular in Japan,lives in London....
I was on his concert last summer,I have to admit that I heard better as well as worse,but the album is great.
Some of the pieces are:The flight of the bumblebee
Grieg's piano concert in a-minor
Handell's sarabande
Rhapsody on a theme of Paganini
Chopin's revolutionary etude in c-minor
etc.
Maybe you'll like it...

Yours truly

I was actually thinking of Maksim at the time I almost started to read this. I saw his performance on Bumblebee and it was great! I say he's making an identity for himself. A punk playing classical. It worked. :D

rojo
Feb-25-2008, 01:52
I heard the Pet Shop Boys' Go West on the radio yesterday, and it dawned on me that it uses the same chord progression as Pachelbel's Canon. I looked it up for confirmation, and discovered that the song was originally by the Village People. (Well, after Pachelbel.) Who knew? :grin:

Azza
Feb-25-2008, 12:19
^ That's what makes me sick. Not giving credit to someone who inspired your song (you more or less "stole" it then). I see this a lot in hip-hop and rap. One band that I see this happen with a lot is Led Zeppelin. They never seem to get credit for the many songs who have used Zeppelinesque samples.
hip hop and rap in my view is not a musical genre,it is a load of rubbish for talentless **** dribblers who steal other peoples sounds and make a total discrace out of it,and become famous out of doing it.....what is the world coming to.........

cambiatagn
Feb-26-2008, 03:41
Have you ever seen the "Pachelbel Rant" on iTunes? Not only is it hilarious, but it does an AMAZING job of finding the Pachelbel chord progression in almost everything! I especially appreciate it, given that it has the world's most boring cello part.

As to the original question, check out the band Renaissance and their "Scheherazade & Other Stories" - aninterpretation of Rimsky-Korsakov's 'epic work, complete with full orchestra . They also did a beautiful, haunting tue built on Bach, but the details elude me just now, and my ex took the album it was on.

Contratrombone64
Feb-26-2008, 05:38
Ah, good old plaigarism. Still, if it was good enough for Shakespeare and JRR Tolkein... ;)

Indeed - and where would Disney corporation be without plagerisim, I ask you...

mathetes1963
Jan-30-2009, 21:58
I've got one: Presto from the "Summer" concerto by Antonio Vivaldi, interpreted by French heavy metal guitarist Patrick Rondat (the poster on YT incorrectly identifies him as Joe Satriani):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WO2l75VuLQA&feature=related :cool:

Mat
Jan-30-2009, 22:04
Very nice. Thanks for the link. If you've got more of that kind of classical music, feel free to post.

CMB
Jan-30-2009, 22:49
From Wikipedia:
"All by Myself" is a power ballad written and performed by Eric Carmen in 1975. It borrows very heavily from the second movement (Adagio Sostenuto) of Sergei Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Opus 18, which Carmen believed was in the public domain. Having found it was not, only after the record had been issued, Carmen had to come to an agreement with the Rachmaninoff estate.

I am always amazed at the number of people who assume - oh its classical music, so it must be in the public domain.
(snort, giggle)

dll927
Jan-30-2009, 22:57
Has anybody brought up the "Elvira Madigan" theme? I can remember seeing CDs with containers that called that famous movement from Mozart's Piano Conerto #21 the "Elvira Madigan theme", when the disc was the concerto and had nothing to do with the movie. Surely a case of trying to use something "modern" to sell a well-known piece.

Ah, the world of marketing!!

Dorsetmike
Jan-31-2009, 15:31
As to the original question, check out the band Renaissance and their "Scheherazade & Other Stories" - aninterpretation of Rimsky-Korsakov's 'epic work, complete with full orchestra . They also did a beautiful, haunting tue built on Bach, but the details elude me just now, and my ex took the album it was on.

Renaissance also did Albinoni's Adagio as "Cold is Being" , I've got about 6 of their Albums on Vinyl and cassette, also saw them live twice.

Sky did the Bach Toccata, and a very straight (just skipped a couple of repeats) of Rameau's Gavotte and variations and also one of Satie's Gymnopodie.

Going back a bit further, Kenny Ball did Fur Elise and a Rondo, even further and Art Tatum did Humeresque back in the 1940s, so plagiarism started well back. Some do it well, others don't.

Andrew Roussak
Jan-31-2009, 21:25
Not sure if it was already said somewhere here in this thread...

One of the greatest hits of Phil Collins "Groovy Kind Of Love" was recorded in 1988 actually as a film soundtrack. This was a cover version already - the song was composed in 1965 by a British band Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders.

And, in turn, the huge melody - the hookline - of the piece is the first 8 bars of Sonatina G dur of Muzio Clementi, 3rd Movement of it, Op 36 N 5. The melody is not even slightly changed, and the original of the piece is seldom mentioned. So , I guess, most of Phil Collins' fans beleive he has himself composed it!:)

mariokbee
Sep-08-2009, 13:31
Hello, this is my first post on this forum. I think that crossover music is really great way to introduce great classical music to wider masses. I myself have started to compose this kind of music after a lot of soul searching and I would like to introduce my first song
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCx5PI0Odpc

Pista Gyerek
Sep-10-2009, 15:39
Have you ever seen the "Pachelbel Rant" on iTunes? Not only is it hilarious, but it does an AMAZING job of finding the Pachelbel chord progression in almost everything!
The Pachelbel Rant (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdxkVQy7QLM)is indeed inspired. I doubt that all the performers mentioned as "quoting" the Canon were even aware of the plagiarism: if Green Day, for example, know who Pachelbel is, I'll eat your lunch.

Since I didn't see it mentioned, I'll add that heavy metal visionaries Spinal Tap quoted Boccherini's "Minuet" just prior to the end of "Heavy Duty Rock and Roll." It was done with the taste and finesse we expect from the band, so you might hardly have noticed it. :rolleyes:

OverlappingCircles
Nov-16-2009, 23:18
Pachelbel's canon is the object of a lot of different interpretations by quite a few budding guitarists on youtube. here's a couple of the better ones:
Matt Rach (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wam-oMub8EU)
Jerry C (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=by8oyJztzwo)
interesting how such a soothing piece of music can change to something so different!!

Dorsetmike
Mar-19-2010, 12:45
1978 Scott Fitzgerald & Yvonne Keeley "If I had Words" from Saint Saens 3rd Organ symphony.

Lusaka_Guitarist
Aug-09-2010, 10:09
The Instrumentation for Coolio's "I'll See You When You Get There" is also based on Pachebel's Canon. I've heard alot of songs that have part of Canon in them.

White Knight
Nov-26-2010, 23:32
Jason, I just came across this thread you posted and came away utterly amazed at the painstaking research and time you must have invested in it. Congratulations and well done!:cheers: I just had a question about one of your citations: namely "Hall Of the Mountain King" as being done by the Who. I had always thought it was another group like King Crimson, Yes or maybe ELP which performed this song but I could be wrong.:confused: Anyway, ciao for now and congrats again on a wonderful thread.:tiphat: Looking forward to hearing from you soon, White Knight.:)

Mat
Nov-27-2010, 03:12
I was just listening to Rachmaninov's 2nd piano concerto and realized that E. Carmen's All By Myself is based on it. On second mvmt, to be precise. It was before I read the thread's opening post.

Corno Dolce
Nov-27-2010, 12:59
"I will never fall in love again", with melody from Adagio movement of Rachmaninoff's 2nd Symphony.

White Knight
Nov-28-2010, 04:28
Jason, you were right; The Who performed this song from their album "The Who Sell Out", which I listened to today. Again, thanks for producing such a magnificently researched and composed thread.:tiphat::cheers:. White Knight.

rsp
Apr-20-2017, 19:01
Three not included on your list (or I just missed them): The Platters' minor hit "Where" (1959), based on the First Movement of Tchaikovsky's Symphony # 6; Jackie Wilson's "Night" (1960), based on the aria "Mon cœur s'ouvre à ta voix (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mon_c%C5%93ur_s%27ouvre_%C3%A0_ta_voix)" from the opera Samson and Delilah (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samson_and_Delilah_%28opera%29) by Saint-Saens; and Elvis's "I Can't Help Falling in Love with You" (1961), which has one of the earliest classical derivations--Martini's "Plaisir d'amour (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plaisir_d%27amour)," written in 1784.

rsp
Apr-20-2017, 19:06
Great catch! How can one forget James Cromwell dancing to "If I Had Words" in the movie Babe? It was my introduction to the Saint Saens organ symphony.

rsp
Apr-20-2017, 19:16
It isn't--but it is very similar to a theme in Siegfried's Funeral March from Wagner's Gotterdammerung. Also, John Williams has ripped off numerous classical pieces, including the ominous, descending, 3-note theme toward the end of Mahler's Symphony #1, which he used in King Kong.

rsp
Apr-20-2017, 19:24
Oh, I forgot: Presley's "Love Me Tender," which is note-for-note the Civil War song "Aura Lee."

bob32116
Apr-22-2017, 01:21
Australian 1970's band Daddy Cool, who were better known for producing retro 1950's style rock, did a semi-proggy track called "Make Your Stash", the melody of which is nicked from the Jupiter movement of The Planets by Gustav Holst.

Apparently Frank Zappa also used this theme, though not being familiar with Zappa's work I can't confirm.

bob32116
Apr-22-2017, 01:25
Oh, I forgot: Presley's "Love Me Tender," which is note-for-note the Civil War song "Aura Lee."
Also Presley's "Can't Help Falling In Love With You" uses the melody from "Plaisir d'amour (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plaisir_d%27amour)"] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Can%27t_Help_Falling_in_Love#cite_note-4) (1784), by Martini.

The original was probably the equivalent of a "pop song" in its day.
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Paul-%C3%89gide_Martini)