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Baroque Organ Music

Ella Beck

Member
I love Baroque Music & I thought it would be useful to have a thread where I can find examples of Baroque Organ Music.

I'm listening to Louis Couperin at the moment.

Performed by Davitt Moroney, Boizard organ (1714), Saint-Michel-en-Thierache.

 
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John Watt

Member
This is an eighteen minute video that explains how a computer can be used to generate original baroque music based on Bach.
The comments alone are mind-boggling.
When computer music replaces human music for soundtracks, who gets the royalties?
There won't be any. Whoever owns the computer that made the music owns the music,
and selling it for use will be where it's at, being disposable compositions, as requested,
with no sheet music involved.


 

Taggart

New member
Staff member
Sr. Regulator
Sweelink is probably the start of Baroque organ music. He influenced Buxtehude and the whole North German organ style. Here's Gustav Leonhardt playing a selection of his works:

 

Taggart

New member
Staff member
Sr. Regulator
And here's a nice piece of seasonal Buxtehude: "In dulci jubilo"

 

Ella Beck

Member
Georg Böhm is another Baroque Composer of Organ Music - I hadn't heard of him, so thought I'd start with a short piece. This is lovely.


Georg Böhm: Prelude and Fugue in C-dur. Performed by Cor Ardesch on the Verschueren organ of the Grote Kerk in Dordrecht, The Netherlands.

 
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Ella Beck

Member
What do you think, MIMF reader? Is this your cup of tea? I find it a little sombre.

Do lovers of organ music have a little more patience and concentration than the average listener?


Dieterich Buxtehude - Passacaglia in D minor

Performed by Mattias Eisenberg on the Silbermann Organ at St. Georgenkirche, Röthe (Germany). From the album "Great European Organs, Number 33: The Silbermann Organ at St. Georgenkirche, Röthe" (1994).

 
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Subdued, with great beauty and peaceful contentment, I would call it. The photos of (wartime?) destruction were jarring, but perhaps there is a message in the last photo (final restoration?).

Analogicus
 

Ella Beck

Member
Subdued, with great beauty and peaceful contentment, I would call it. The photos of (wartime?) destruction were jarring, but perhaps there is a message in the last photo (final restoration?).

Analogicus

Thanks - lovely to have your opinion and a bit of conversation. Have a nice day. :)
 

Krummhorn

Administrator
Staff member
ADMINISTRATOR
I have always liked the D minor Passacaglia of Buxtehude. His ciaconna's are also wonderful.

Played the D minor many times years ago when I regularly did concerts. Last concert I did was in 2010, in Denmark.
 

John Watt

Member
It's easy to listen to baroque organ music, as far as a listening experience goes,
but I don't know anything about baroque organs, so here's a demonstration.
You can see this gentleman isn't used to putting on a show, just sitting there,
when he knocks a candle out of the holder.
5,211 pipes, I never would have thought that.
I was thinking this American organ in Illinois is something Krummhorn may have come across.
There weren't any Danish baroque organs on display.

 

John Watt

Member
This is a shorter video, less than three minutes long, and this woman is a wonderful organist.
She's improvising, my favorite kind of music.

 

John Watt

Member
When you're on the road, or traveling as a musician, playing an instrument you made yourself,
as I did, being left-handed, sometimes another musician invites you to his place to show you what he did.
I can't imagine that happening to baroque organ players, but here we go.
If it was me, I'd be hoping for some baroque food, maybe some sticky fruit cake or gamey hens.


 

Ella Beck

Member
Johann Caspar Ferdinand Fischer - Chaconne (Euterpe)

Massimo Gabba
Organo Moucherel-Formentelli
Albi Cathédrale 2012


I only discovered this composer recently. In the early eighteenth century he was considered one of the foremost keyboardists of his day. He was an admirer of Lully & introduced the French baroque style to Germany.

I love his music - what a pity it is that not much of it has survived, or I'm sure that his reputation would be higher.
 
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wljmrbill

Member
Love the sound of this instrument and great console , and takes" two to tango: so to speak as we are spoiled with a piston system mostly these days. Thanks for posting
 

John Watt

Member
Over here you rarely hear "two to tango", it's become "two to tangle".
Ella Beck typed "what a pity it is that not much of it has survived, or I'm sure that his reputation would be higher.
Over here that would be "A scholars' ink lasts longer than a martyrs' blood".

Looking around, seeing many organ videos, including what is supposed to be the best organ,
is very interesting. In Ontario, in 1900, one out of four homes had an acoustic piano.
Now that is synthesizers with every kind of sound.
But that's all I'm going to do, is just mention synthesizers,
keeping wattage out of play in this thread.
However, I am tempted to include a baroque pump organ.

 

Ella Beck

Member
Johann Caspar Ferdinand Fischer: Prelude and Fugue I in C Major (Marco Lo Muscio: Organ)

Hauptwerk System (Laurenskerk, Rotterdam)Recorded: March 24 2018


Fabulous Fischer! :)
 
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