Great Jazz Pianists

White Knight

Spectral Warrior con passion
McCoy Tyner, Bobby Timmons, Thelonious Monk, Dave Brubeck, Esbjorn Svensson, Horace Silver, Chick Corea and Herbie Hancock {in no particular ranking order, of course, as each one of these geniuses brings his own distinct style and flair to the ivories}. Oh yeah, Sonny Clark, Keith Jarret and Joe Zawinul.
 

Dorsetmike

New member
My personal preferences, Mel Powell, Mary Lou Wiliams, Count Basie, Oscar Peterson, Brubeck, Albert Ammons, Erroll Garner, Jools Holland, Art Tatum, George Shearing, Andre Previn, Teddy Wilson, Bud Powell, Jessica Williams, John Lewis, Ralph Sutton, Bill McGuffie, Judy Carmichael, not in any particular order. I'm afraid Monk, Jarrett, and Tyner don't do anything for me.
 

John Watt

Active member
I'm not going to add any more names, but I'd like to share my experience as an Ontarian.
Of course I was into rock music, what was on the radio and television.
I saw Jimi Hendrix and Deep Purple as a teen, and knew what rock bands I wanted to listen to.

It was jazz pianists that disappointed me, all those albums, all those jazz vocalists.
Classical pianists played up a storm, all kinds of dynamics, if they didn't have percussive rhythm or a beat behind them.
But jazz pianists seemed hesitant, more chordal, tossing in the odd fast riff.
Sure, being an accompianist is one thing, but it wasn't even blues or mournful for me,
even "Gloomy Sunday" or "Strange Fruit" by Billie Holiday.
Ragtime seemed to get it going, but that was more of a solo art than orchestral.

Oscar Peterson was a great man. Living in Hamilton, half an hour away, his neighbours loved and watched over him.
So would I, if it meant sitting out on the porch, listening to him play.
 

stu

New member
So many piano players. I enjoy the offerings of all the players so far mentioned. I guess it started with Bud Powell for me. As for the rhythmic side of things, Count Basie could swing us into bad health with only a very few well placed notes. Almost a less is better approach. On the busier side, one whom I feel deserves high praise, is Dave McKenna. Dave was a two fisted giant. Solo piano was his thing and he had his own built in rhythm section.
http://wwhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=8ABuUFhp8vM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ABuUFhp8vM&feature=player_detailpage
 

JHC

Chief assistant to the assistant chief
It was jazz pianists that disappointed me, all those albums, all those jazz vocalists.
Classical pianists played up a storm, all kinds of dynamics, if they didn't have percussive rhythm or a beat behind them.
But jazz pianists seemed hesitant, more chordal, tossing in the odd fast riff.
That is exactly what a Jazz Piano player does, they ain't no Hewitt or Tureck
Ragtime seemed to get it going, but that was more of a solo art than orchestral. :grin:

.
You are right, with the average Ragtime/Dixie or trad band being 7 players it could never be anything else.
 

OLDUDE

New member
This response to my thread is great - we seem to be getting lots of related comments arising

Isnt this what the forum is about?
 

OLDUDE

New member
A bit Monkish perhaps?
Red Garland turns up in quite a few of the tracks on my "Early Trane" set of 4 CDs
 

teddy

Duckmeister
I have mentioned Dudley Moore before. A classical trained pianist that really loved jazz. Listen to Mamas Got a Brand new Bag on youtube. Look beneath the humour and you will see what I mean

teddy
 

pioudine

New member
A few years ago a great jazz pianist died : Michel petrucciani. This guy was exceptionnally gifted as a jazz composer and performer with an incredible pianistic technique and a great sense of melodic improvisation. Huge by talent but small by size, Michel is to me, one of the most important jazz pianist of his generation.
September 2nd is one of my favourite Michel's compositions.
Thanks to him !
 
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