Health Care

Contratrombone64

Admiral of Fugues
I think the Scandinavian countries handle the welfare of their populations FAR better than the rest of the west. Denmark, especially, is very caring of its folk. Of course, the Scandos DO pay very high rates of income tax (no problem with that).
 

Chi_townPhilly

New member
Sr. Regulator
I think the Scandinavian countries handle the welfare of their populations FAR better than the rest of the west. Denmark, especially, is very caring of its folk. Of course, the Scandos DO pay very high rates of income tax (no problem with that).
If handling a Welfare-State network is an initiative undergirded with the "consent-of-the-governed," then I, too have no problem with that- but with one big proviso-

As long as said government doesn't spend more than it takes in---

I understand that Norway doesn't overspend (due to the fact that they're awash in North Sea Oil revenues). The rest of the 'Norden' countries-- I'm nae so sure~~
 

teddy

Duckmeister
Waiting times for treatment are a major factor when opting for private health care. As Margaret mentioned so is cleanliness and also the nurse patient ration. On the NHS you do not usually meet the surgeon who will operate, rather than having the oportunity to discuss all aspects of the case with him, and geting after care from him.

teddy
 

JHC

Chief assistant to the assistant chief
Waiting times for treatment are a major factor when opting for private health care. As Margaret mentioned so is cleanliness
They always make me take a shower before I am allowed in the ward
and also the nurse patient ration.
I am quite happy with this 2 to 1 is fine after all I am not as young as I used to be
On the NHS you do not usually meet the surgeon who will operate
that is a blessing in disguise who wants a drunk surgeon????
, rather than having the oportunity to discuss all aspects of the case with him, and geting after care from him.

teddy
The only thing I ever got from a surgeon was a big fat bill.
 

teddy

Duckmeister
Having come back from France where I had emergency treatment for a foot injury within 10 minutes of arriving at the clinic, I have now been told that I will have to wait up to 7 weeks to see a podiatrist. Considering I am diabetic, and this is meant to be very important, I am a bit gob smacked, to say the least. Anyone wondering why I fork out for private health care........stop wondering.

teddy
 

JHC

Chief assistant to the assistant chief
teddy, The only benefit of health Ins is to get in quickly
 

White Knight

Spectral Warrior con passion
Having come back from France where I had emergency treatment for a foot injury within 10 minutes of arriving at the clinic, I have now been told that I will have to wait up to 7 weeks to see a podiatrist. Considering I am diabetic, and this is meant to be very important, I am a bit gob smacked, to say the least. Anyone wondering why I fork out for private health care........stop wondering.

teddy
@ teddy, I am so sorry to hear about your misfortune and I hope all works out for you. I was wondering why you were able to be seen so quickly in France vis a vis your experience in your own country. Is it because you were "only" a temporary visitor? Does France have a health-care system similar to that of Great Britain's, would you know?
 

teddy

Duckmeister
Colin, its not just speed over here it is also the quality of care. Private 2 patients per nurse, NHS over 30 patients per nurse. Also the time spent with doctors and specialists, who are willing to discuss and explain everything rather than you just seein a junior for 10 minuets.

Steve The French seem more efficient and they are not having to treat so many immigrants who arrive in this country with aids or TB or heavily pregnant so they can get treatment. Treatment in both countries is meant to be prioritised but the Aand E departments here often have a 2 or 3 hour waiting time. I took my daughter in with concussion and had to wait 3 hours to see a doctor. Not good with a head injury. Visitors to England are meant to pay for treatment unless there is a reciprical arrangement with their own country, but too often they turn very littleup here and then get a human rights lawyer (free to them) and claim all sorts of rights. If you live and work here it is almost immpossible to get legal aid so we end up paying for everything and geting very little (rant over)

teddy
 

White Knight

Spectral Warrior con passion
@Teddy, That is completely unfair. However, I was under the impression that France has also lately experienced--as has Great Britain--a tremendous influx of these so called immigrants. Is there anything else in the difference in the way the French and British administer their respective NHS systems which would to your mind explain such disparity in service delivery, or do you believe it is solely or primarily due to the overload placed on the British system by these "newcomers"?
 

Dorsetmike

New member
I must say I've not had the same experiences as Teddy, there are some rumours about the different levels of health care dependant on where in the UK you live. I've only had occasion to visit the local GP or hospital less than 5 or 6 times over the years 1980 to 2007 since 2007 I have been diagnosed as being borderline type 2 diabetic, (controllable by diet, no medication) but do as a result require 6 monthly blood tests. Never had any problems with waiting except for the office staff to answer the phone!
 

teddy

Duckmeister
Mike, where you live has an affect. We are close to Dover and thats where most of them land. Plus regular appointments for diabetes are generally well managed to try and contain the increase with this idease.

Steve, In France illegal immigrants have to wait 6 months before they are due any benifits, by which time they are in England. The French system requires a small regular contribution if you live there. So what, we pay NHS contributions over here. If you belong to a member country, like England, you have to show your card with all your details, and then you are entitled to the same treatment as that country provides to the native population. System seems to work quite well. And their hospitals are a lot cleaner than most of ours. MRSA is just about unknow abroad.

teddy
 

JHC

Chief assistant to the assistant chief
Our private hospitals do not have full time Doctors only Nurses, there is a duty Doctor during the day but at night no Doctors, during the day you see your Surgeon, apart from the Surgeon the amount of expertise is low if a complication arises then off you go to the public Hospital which has all the equipment, specialist, Doctors and the best Nurses. having experienced both over the last 3 yrs I would choose the public system every time.
 

teddy

Duckmeister
The local private hospital which we use is attached the the main NHS one. A&E is a very short trolley ride away. The nurses all love working in the private sector because " we get a chance to nurse". The doctors and surgeons are mainly the same ones, the big difference being you actually get to see and talk to them, which can be very reassuring. And it is very clean. The heart ward on the NHS ward I was initially in was dirty (I saw the same dirty dressings on the floor for three days) and I was not washed, or helped to wash for six days. The crew of the private ambulance (ex army guys) which took me to London for my opp. were horrified at the lack of hygiene in the NHS. Apparently in the army hospitals all patients were washed at least twice a day.

teddy
 

Dorsetmike

New member
I think this quote from a Guardian newspaper article sums up the big shortcoming of private medicine

There's an unavoidable contradiction between running something to maximise profit as opposed to running a service designed to meet the needs of patients,"

This was reporting on a private contractor which took over a NHS practice then walked away after 3 years of a 10 year contract to run a general practice in a London borough, they couldn't do the job for the price they quoted; most patients were unable to get an appointment within 48 hours, and rarely with the doctor of their choice.
 

Dorsetmike

New member
In answer to Teddy's post above re cleaning, that is mainly to be found where the hospital cleaning has been contracted out to a private company.

It's the same sort of contradiction between making a profit and providing the necessary level of care and service as in any other profit versus service issue; the words profit and service don't belong in the same sentence.

The same issue crops up in any public service, not just health; too many services have been privatised and in virtually every case the service deteriorates and the price escalates.

In the UK it's happened to Transport (bus and train), post, phones, gas (for cooking and heating not vehicles) and electricity, water and drainage; in some towns waste disposal, and many other services.
 

JHC

Chief assistant to the assistant chief
@Mike, exactly the same down here, however in teddies case the dirty dressings is absolutely unbelievable some one should have picked it up. what we are in for now (NZ) is Private/Public enterprises where the public aka tax payer pays for and builds the infrastructure it is then contracted out to the private sector to run and make lots of luvly spondulex out of, I am now turning into a socialist :crazy::crazy:
 

Corno Dolce

Admiral Honkenwheezenpooferspieler
!!!Let us not forget!!!: One very minor but oh so important detail is the contract. Contracts "regulate" what is to be and not to be done. Tell me who are the people who negotiate the terms of the contract on behalf of the "voting constituency" and pretty soon you'll understand why the "health care" is an ephemeral mirage.
 
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