Jazz from around the World

John Watt

Active member
I'm sorry, but I've got to start by debating this thread theme.
I'm from Canada, lower Ontario, catching mostly American media and American infotainment.
They always say jazz is an American art form and was invented by Americans.

Considering that, what you're typing about jazz from other countries,
must be seen as other cultures using modern electronics to place their music along with American jazz.
I would still call jazz recordings of sitarists from India as raga, not New Age or Indian Jazz.
Indian Jazz? The average American would think that's a drunk Apache playing a sax around the campfire.

Yes, this might seem demanding, but as I say, this is what I see and read, most of the time.

And when you type jazz at me, I understand jazz as spontaneous improvisation.
People in other countries producing copies of pre-existing jazz is simply not jazz music,
whether it's American or Arctican.
Yeah, I'm Canadian, and the average Inuit is more tuned up than any American.
 
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OLDUDE

New member
My, this must be a good thread - already we have controvery.
I must admit, when I suggested this thread , I had in mind jazz music (of any sub-genre), presenting samples of indigenous jazz.
However, I obviously havent thought it through too well, and who am I to prevent Forum members from handling the subject as they wish
with my blessing.
An individual comment to J.W. (Hi John, its good to have you back).
Its true that jass developed in the States (New Orleans to be precise) but even then its roots are partially derived from the parts of the world
from whence the originators stem. Africa mainly of course but Europe too. (Think Cajun and more lately, Latin America.)
Yes, when jazz extends to other countries there is inevitably going to be many similarities to American jazz music, (in its many forms).
However when researching for the thread (via Youtube I admit) it became apparent that differences do occur and National characteristics
do creep (or in some cases jump) in.
Finally, you use the term "spontaneous improvisation" and I am sure this is still important in solo contributions. But when it comes to many jazz
productions, you will notice the reference to "arranged by" which applies to most of them. Enough said.

Jazz from Nigeria http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HmCnOP8_6hQ&feature=player_detailpage

Cheers John
 
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gord

New member
hi j w, your reply to john (oldude) got me wondering. i think what you are saying is, only american jazz is the real thing. jazz from say france or italy is not, it is a copy. i am looking at my designer watch,it is not real,but a knock off. it looks good, works fine, and does the job,but is not a real one. so could foreign jazz be considered like knock off jazz then? it is something that never occured to me before. i have got to think about this. gord
 

gord

New member
although that japanese hardbop was quite good,i found something missing that i get when listening to the likes of coltrane,dexter or blakey.maybe j.w. is right in his assessment of foreign jazz. gord
 

OLDUDE

New member
Hi Mat,
That seems to be the sort of thing that I'm aiming at.
Remind me of where it comes from - Poland or russia or where ?
Hi gord,
This is obviously not Japanese musicians and I dont understand the writing-strangely enough.
I assume they are visitors to Japan and as such they are probably American Hardboppers.
We must surely listen to indigenous players to discover whether their music has anything different to it.

Cheers John
 

Mat

Active member
Staff member
Sr. Regulator
Regulator
Glad you liked it, John. It's Polish jazz in all its glory.
 

OLDUDE

New member
Country of origin

Glad you liked it, John. It's Polish jazz in all its glory.
I apologise if suggesting you're Russian seems insulting.
(and now I must apologise to any Russian forum members and deny any
intent of offense)
 

Mat

Active member
Staff member
Sr. Regulator
Regulator
I don't feel insulted at all. I was just answering your question. Maybe I worded my response inaccurately.
 
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