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Organ Music that isn't Staid.

Ella Beck

Member
Hello.

It's taken me decades to appreciate organ music, probably because, growing up in the 1960s, I associated it with church services and old people.

Ironically enough, I'm an old church-goer myself now, but I still don't really go for organ music that is too slow or sedate or staid - though I'll make an exception for works which are magnificently powerful or grand.

Is it possible to have organ music that sparkles, or must it always be 'august'?

I would love it if you organ music aces could post some organ music that is the reverse of staid - lively, powerful, magnificent, awesome or whatever. Just not staid.

Thank you.
 

Ella Beck

Member
^^^^ - Yes, this is fantastic - like Dr Johnson of dictionary fame in a particularly clubbable mood, or a Queen Elephant with a twinkle in her eye.
Absolutely the reverse of staid.
Thank you, Mike!
 

Ella Beck

Member
Organ music where there's another instrument - especially a brass instrument - is the very reverse of staid.
I love this modern piece, that I learned about from a game on another music forum. :)

 

Nikam

New member
Organ music where there's another instrument - especially a brass instrument - is the very reverse of staid.
I love this modern piece, that I learned about from a game on another music forum. :)


An interesting piece of music, the organ acting as accompaniment to the trumpet, rather than as a solo instrument.
 

Ella Beck

Member
You're right - it doesn't totally count as 'organ music'. I just couldn't resist its gorgeousness. :)

However, on reflection, I think 'accompaniment' doesn't quite cover the important part the organ plays in this modern composition. It is more like a duet, with the trumpet the senior partner.

Please, though, do post a non-staid solo organ piece of your own choosing - it would be much appreciated!
 
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Ella Beck

Member
In the mean time, here's one that I found for myself. Ravishing!

(Buxtehude - Toccata in D minor, BuxWV 155 - B. Foccroulle)

 

Dorsetmike

New member
There wil be those who say this is sacrilege, but you could never call it staid, maybe not quite the organ Bach had in mind!

 

elderpiano

Member


Listening to this now, I had audacity to request this played at my wedding, instead of the traditional Mendelssohn's Wedding March, I felt quite cheeky with this request really, and the poor, church organist wasn't used to playing such fast Handel pieces, I think she was quite worried it would go well, and she did amazingly well! She must have practiced hard! Other pieces I chose was Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring which was beautiful!
 
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John Watt

Member
The soft tones of the soft chords at the beginning carry you in as a listener,
and it keeps building, a tone poem that becomes more dynamic as it progresses.
An improvisation... from a musician who has the music in him and works at working it out.
It takes a special permission to improvise on property this resplendent,
and it takes more than a special permission to unite it with spirited musicianship.


 

Ella Beck

Member
Definitely not staid!
[h=1]Excerpt from Maurice Duruflé, Toccata from 'Suite', Op.5 (Virtuoso! Music for Organ)[/h]
 

Ella Beck

Member
This YouTube video is gorgeous - I love William Byrd - and the very reverse of staid. :)

[h=1]The Galliarde to the firste pavian - William Byrd (organ)[/h]
 

Ella Beck

Member
And what about this? It isn't exactly 'staid' but it is somewhat sombre. However, I just love that measured renaissance sound. It's lovely!

 
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