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janny108
Jul-09-2007, 00:29
I've heard of this instrument but not sure what it is. Violincello?
Jan

Krummhorn
Jul-09-2007, 00:48
Violincello is also at times abbreviated to "cello" ... means the same, basically. The cello is the lowest sounding member of the violin family.

Interesting to note that the cello can also be played left-handed. I have yet to see this done, but I suppose it's possible.

tomato
Jul-09-2007, 02:02
Unless you are referring to an instrument I have never heard of before,
that should be "violoncello."

The string bass is a "violon," or "large viol."
The cello is a "violoncello," or "small large viol."
Yes, I know, that's an oxymoron.
"Cello" is an abbreviation.

Ironically, the viola, which is the most neglected member of the family, is the prototypical instrument in this nomenclature.
"Violin" means "small viol."

Krummhorn
Jul-09-2007, 02:11
Great information, Tomato ... thanks.

True about the Viola - a beautifully toned instrument.

janny108
Jul-09-2007, 03:58
Thanks.
Jan

Art Rock
Jul-09-2007, 12:13
The cello is the lowest sounding member of the violin family.

Interesting - the double bass is not seen as a member of the violin family?

And by the way, the cello is one of my favourite instruments to listen to. Especially the Bach sonatas.

zlya
Jul-10-2007, 01:55
The double bass is seen as a member of the viola da gamba family. The shape is slightly different from the shape of instruments in the violin family, and (I believe) the tuning system is different as well.

Of course, the viola da gamba itself is not very common today, possibly because it was extremely difficult to play without sounding like a dying cat. I believe there's a good viola da gamba part in Bach's St. John's Passion.

some guy
Jul-10-2007, 02:30
Don't know about St. John, but there is indeed a viola da gamba part in the St. Matthew Passion that's to die for. It's mesmerizing for sure.

Phillip Wilcher
Jul-10-2007, 03:10
It's a very beautiful instrument - possibly my favourite - which is so closely aligned to the voice that to write for it is a joyous experience. Try hear Brahm's E minor cello sonata sometime - it's very beautiful.
www.phillipwilcher.com (http://www.phillipwilcher.com)

zlya
Jul-10-2007, 03:40
I think I was thinking of the alto/viola da gamba duet "Es ist vollbracht" in St. John's.

John Curtin
Jul-10-2007, 18:19
The double bass is seen as a member of the viola da gamba family. The shape is slightly different from the shape of instruments in the violin family, and (I believe) the tuning system is different as well.


That's correct: the double bass' strings are tuned (ascending) to E, A, D, G, which interestingly is like a violin tuned in reverse (G, D, A, E). So a bass is tuned in 4ths rather than 5ths.

janny108
Jul-11-2007, 02:16
I love the sound of the double bass!
jan:)

some guy
Jul-12-2007, 19:43
Hey, thanks, Zyla. One more reason to go buy another cd, eh?

tomato
Jul-16-2007, 01:21
Has anyone read any books by Lois Choksy?
She has catalogued many folk songs in the English language and found that the easiest songs have only two notes a minor third apart.
She therefore advocates beginning music instruction for English-speaking children with the minor third.
This is less than ideal for string instrument beginners, because there are no two strings tuned a minor third apart.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v500/pentatonika/cuckoo.jpg

Choksy exhorts music teachers in other countries to make a similar collection, and to plan the music curriculum according to their findings.
Here in Korea, there are oodlums of songs using only two notes a perfect fourth apart.
In this song, the words mean "Let's play terrapin.":

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v500/pentatonika/?action=view&current=terrapin.gif

I would love to teach Korean string bass beginners, wouldn't you?

sandkorn
Jul-19-2007, 20:48
Of course, the viola da gamba itself is not very common today, possibly because it was extremely difficult to play without sounding like a dying cat.


Well, it's quite true, but there are some extremely beautiful viola da gamba-music. Especially by Marin Marais. I'm in love with Marin Marais.

janny108
Jul-25-2007, 18:30
The double bass is seen as a member of the viola da gamba family. The shape is slightly different from the shape of instruments in the violin family, and (I believe) the tuning system is different as well.

Of course, the viola da gamba itself is not very common today, possibly because it was extremely difficult to play without sounding like a dying cat. I believe there's a good viola da gamba part in Bach's St. John's Passion.

Who or what is "da gamba"?
Jan

Art Rock
Jul-25-2007, 21:49
The viola da gamba is translated as viol of the leg (since it is held between the knees when played).

janny108
Jul-26-2007, 16:06
Thanks.
Jan

SHANON LUIS
Sep-18-2008, 09:05
The violoncello is a bowed string instrument. A person who plays a cello is called a cellist. The cello is used as a solo instrument, in chamber music, and as a member of the string section of an orchestra.Bowed, string instrument that is the second largest member of the violin family and one of the four instruments that make up the string quartet. Its full name is violoncello but the abbreviation cello is more commonly used today.
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SHANON

methodistgirl
Sep-18-2008, 21:13
Welcome to the forum Shannon!
judy tooley

marval
Sep-18-2008, 23:13
Hi Shannon

Welcome to the forum, thank you for the information. Do stick around and join in.


Margaret

Contratrombone64
Sep-19-2008, 02:54
The viola da gamba is translated as viol of the leg (since it is held between the knees when played).

Exactly, as opposed to a viola da braccio (played with the arms).

Tûrwethiel
Sep-19-2008, 08:45
I once read a really interesting novel narrated from the point of view of a viola da gamba. From memory, the book traced the instrument's journey through the hands of different musicians and even through the "surgery" required to transform it into a cello when fashions changed. And, no, I didn't buy the book because it was called Resonating Bodies!

Corno Dolce
Sep-19-2008, 09:43
Aloha Tûrwethiel,

"Surgery to transform a Viola da Gamba into a Cello"?

Egads, the Gamba is such a sweet instrument. Btw, I warmly recommend that you get yourself a copy of JSBach's Cello Suites adapted for the Gamba and played by Paolo Pandolfo:

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/3108AM7VPWL._SL500_AA240_.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.amazon.com/Bach-The-Six-Suites/dp/B00005Q39U&h=240&w=240&sz=9&hl=en&start=38&um=1&usg=__RRFXhQ1PNqIxYbEtPow_IyN5Oqo=&tbnid=H8jnrJttMVBTWM:&tbnh=110&tbnw=110&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dpaolo%2Bpandolfo%26start%3D21%26ndsp% 3D21%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Doff%26sa%3DN

Its a fabulous recording.

Cheerio,

Corno Dolce :):):)

Tûrwethiel
Sep-23-2008, 06:54
Thanks Corno Dolce. My CD collection is sadly lacking when it comes to Bach's cello suites so I will take your advice.

Contratrombone64
Sep-23-2008, 07:52
Sweet Corn - I think they would sound lovely on the viola da gamba ... not much farnarkeling need in arranging I imagine?

Corno Dolce
Sep-23-2008, 08:47
Aloha CT64,

Very little farnarkeling indeed. I sometimes wish that I would have gotten to know the viola da gamba better when I was younger - the sound is so heavenly.

Cheerio,

CD :):):)

Contratrombone64
Sep-23-2008, 09:53
Yes, heavenly indeed - I've never had the pleasure, though, spending a considerable amount of my early musical effort playing viola ... I consider myself historically more connected than, say, a violinist would.

Soubasse
Sep-23-2008, 12:46
As is your right IMO. I've always preferred the more resonant, rounded sounds of the viola and in particular the da gamba. When I was at Uni, there was an Early Music ensemble at the time consisting of three gamba players and continuo, who between them all, made a simply superb sound. I wheedled my way onto the harpsichord stool later in the year which coincidentally suited me fine since by that stage I had become - stupidly - smitten with the only female member of the group. I say "stupidly" because she ended up with a lutenist ... clearly I wasn't quite Early Music enough for her (I was mostly playing Messiaen that year).:grin:

Incidentally, I think I've come to the conclusion the word farnarkeling looks every bit as amusing in print, if not more so, as it does being spoken. Wonderful to see it still in use. I will now go and tell my boys to stop farnarkeling around and get back to bed.

MPA

(PS: string family, violoncelli, viola da gamba, err ... resonating bodies - just trying to stay on topic here :D)

Corno Dolce
Sep-23-2008, 16:35
Aloha Soubasse,

So, you were *two-timing* with Messiaen and Early Music, eh? :grin::grin::grin:

Yeah, *Gambists* and Lutenists usually *find* each other....

Cheerio,

CD :):):):)

ps. Many years ago while I was living in Europe, I had signed up for a summer music seminar in Lausanne. I had prepared Franck's Sonata in A-major for Violin and Piano and then rehearsed with a gal who was part-Irish, part Italian - She was smitten with me and planted a big *wet one* on stage after the performance. She combined intelligence and looks but I felt that I could not reciprocate.

Contratrombone64
Sep-24-2008, 00:19
Incidentally, I think I've come to the conclusion the word farnarkeling looks every bit as amusing in print, if not more so, as it does being spoken. Wonderful to see it still in use. I will now go and tell my boys to stop farnarkeling around and get back to bed.


You're very welcome.

Contratrombone64
Sep-24-2008, 00:21
I seem to remember an hilarous ditty (voice and piano) with the main theme or at least string of words "The pro-musica antiqua" but sung "The prooooooooooo musica, the proooooooooooo muscia, the prooooooooooo musica antiiiiiiiqua". About a lass who went to her local early musical society's concert and got, er well, ravished by a handsome man in the audience "He laid me high and he laid me low". It's the most hilarious thing I've heard, wish I knew how to get hold of a copy.

Contratrombone64
Sep-24-2008, 00:24
And, thanks to Google here it is:

I'll sing you a song of the Cloisters if you hark.
I'll sing of the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.
Where I used to go in the month of June
To listen to the riddle of an ancient tune
At a concert given in the afternoon
By the Pro Musica Antiqua, the Pro Musica Antiqua
The Pro Musica, the Pro Musica, the Pro Musica Antiqua.

It was at precisely such a recital I recall
That I met a young man, like an oak tree, straight and tall.
As we sat there together, and we spoke no word
As within our hearts ---Ah, something stirred
As we listened there to Buxtehude, Purcell and Byrd
At the Pro Musica, the Pro Musica, the Pro Musica Antiqua.

He invited me to his flat
For a cup of tea and a chat.
For he said he had a batch of recordings to play
Of Dufy and Dupres, so what could I say, but "Yes"!
What a fool I was to go.
What an idiot from tippy-top to toe.
For behind that face and charming smile
Lay a motive base and a manner vile.
What a fool I was to go!
But how could I nonny nonny nonny know?

Well he took me up to his flat as he had said
And he locked the door and he sat on his great double bed
And he looked at me with eyes that lied
And I knew when I saw that look in his eye
That he had no recordings of Dupres and Dufy
From the Pro Musica, the Pro Musica, the Pro Musica Antiqua.

Well there I stood. I was rooted in my place.
As I viewed with dread my deceitful lover's face.
For I knew from the lovesick look in his eye,
He could lay me low with a single sigh
Well he laid me low...and he laid me high
At the Pro Musica, the Pro Musica, the Pro Musica Antiqua.

Now if you go to concerts on the grass
And you're overfond of Gabrielli brass
Or a gay Bonsel, Beware! Beware!
Of what may come to pass.
Of what may come to pass.

Now the sound of a consort of viols makes me ill,
And the lute and the zither make me sicker still.
And every morning at the crowing of the cocks
I wash my face and I comb my locks
And I brush my teeth and I put a pox
On the Pro Musica, the Pro Musica, the Pro Musica Antiqua.

Now maidens take fair warning from my tale.
Beware! Beware of the music-loving male.
You can go to the Cloisters if you choose
And seek enchantment in the muse
But I hate to tell you what you might lose
At the Pro Musica, the Pro Musica, the Pro Musica Antiqua.

Corno Dolce
Sep-24-2008, 08:22
Hrrrumpf!!! - CT64!!! :scold::scold::scold::scold::scold:

You naughty boy :grin::grin::grin:

Contratrombone64
Sep-26-2008, 07:49
Sweet Corn - I found it monumentally amusing, I'm sad you took it so literally (as always).

Corno Dolce
Sep-26-2008, 09:22
Aloha CT64,

Didn't you see my three grin smileys after the phrase *you naughty boy*? That means I didn't take it literally...:D:D:D:D:D:D:D

Cheerio,

CD :):):)

jamescliff
Oct-04-2008, 15:05
Hi janny108,

The violoncello, or cello for short, is aaa member of the string family, which includes violin, viola violoncello, and double bass from highest to lowest. The full name, violoncello, is responsible for the standard score abbreviation of Vc. for the cello staff. There is one cello, along with aaa viola and two violins, in aaa string quartet, and aaa section of cellos, possibly ten or so, in large orchestras.

Thanx,

__________________________
James Cliff
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