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Robert Newman
Jan-07-2009, 15:00
I'm in my 50's. That means I know an awful lot less about computers, video tapes and technology than most folks who will read this. But I have a question -

Sometimes I see video tape or DVD where the sound track is slightly out of timing with the visual. How does this error happen in the first place ? Can anything be done to fix it ? Is there a simple way to edit/repair such material cheaply and without too much complication ?

Cheers and thanks for any answers.

Robert (Newman)

sunwaiter
Jan-07-2009, 15:12
the offset problems occur often on the internet, and i don't know why exactly, i'm not a specialist. but i've been in a sound technique school for a while and i approached the post-production operations, mainly the synchronization, that is done with the help of what we call the time-code. hours, minutes, seconds and frames are the cues used when we need to make a sound recording go along a film. the same technique is used to mix different sound tracks recorded on different recorders, which today are mainly digital, of course.

concerning a VHS tape, i don't see how it would be possible to fix the problem since everything (image and sound) is on the same and only tape. concerning a digital format like a DVD things also appear to be quite set and still, but the problem may be the player itself. i already had some issues like yours on a low-cost/low-quality DVD player. thus i would say the solution may be in a better DVD player.

for those who may answer in a mlore informed and sharp way, please excuse me if what i said wasn't exactly right!

Robert Newman
Jan-07-2009, 19:35
Thanks Sunwaiter,

That's really helpful.

Robert

Buchpteclare
Jan-30-2009, 21:10
The only thing I can think of that would cause such a problem, Robert, is the spacing between the audio record head and the video head was slightly different on the original machine. Trying to correct the problem in some easy way that does not involve rerecording (in analog format) thats not overly complicated is what we need.

I have never tried this except in some digital to digital video-audio recordings but it may work in your case. Using digital editing software, record the VCR tape converting to digital format. The editing software should show both the audio and video as seperate and distinct tracks. Then introduce an offset delay to whichever is the leading track - and when you have the two tracks in sync - save to disc. Doing all this digitally should minimize any rerecording distortion. (Now if only I can get my n key unstuck - grin).:confused:

Robert Newman
Jan-31-2009, 00:16
The only thing I can think of that would cause such a problem, Robert, is the spacing between the audio record head and the video head was slightly different on the original machine. Trying to correct the problem in some easy way that does not involve rerecording (in analog format) thats not overly complicated is what we need.

I have never tried this except in some digital to digital video-audio recordings but it may work in your case. Using digital editing software, record the VCR tape converting to digital format. The editing software should show both the audio and video as seperate and distinct tracks. Then introduce an offset delay to whichever is the leading track - and when you have the two tracks in sync - save to disc. Doing all this digitally should minimize any rerecording distortion. (Now if only I can get my n key unstuck - grin).:confused:

Thank you so very much for writing this, Buychpteclare ! It's very informative. I'm a 7th grade student in such things - no doubt young children known more than I of it. But what you say really helps and many, many thanks. Best wishes

Robert