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magnum opus
Feb-01-2009, 15:19
Hello all,
We've recently acquired a 'Content'digital organ in our church (this is made in Holland). Just wondered if anyone has played on these digital organs and what their experiences have been.

Thanks

Ntalikeris666
Feb-02-2009, 00:46
Hello all,
We've recently acquired a 'Content'digital organ in our church (this is made in Holland). Just wondered if anyone has played on these digital organs and what their experiences have been.

Thanks

I am planning to buy one of them (probably a Mondri 5800)
So i am gonna visit the factory at easter to check them out from upclose.
Tell me something, how much did you buy it and with what specifications (wooden draw stops etc)
could you also describe me the quality of the wood which the organ is made of?


Thanks

Best Wishes
Nicholas

jmcpher1
Feb-08-2009, 17:13
I used to have the Content Organ Expander with 20 Stops which I used through my Yamaha Clavinova and found this to be a very good way of producing a classical pipe organ sound. It had one or two limitations and I was not overly fond of the Principal 8 voice as it was rather insipid for my taste.

When I upgraded to an organ a few years ago I settled on the Wyvern Sonata Mark 1V which has 31 stops based on an English Specification but built with Contents' technology. I far prefer the "English" voicing to the continental voicing. The Diapasons on both swell and great are good rounded diapason sounds and the Lieblich Gedekt 8 combines well with the Gamba 8 and Vox Celeste 8 to produce a lovely etheral string tone which is much smoother than could be produced on the EXL 220 with the Holz Flute8, Gamba 8 and Celeste 8. In fact I was surprized by how good and useful the Lieblich Gedekt 8 is. I had been prejudiced by past experience of this stop in a Father Willis Pipe Organ into thinking that this stop would be of little use. However in the Wyvern it is one of my favourite stops.

In my experience, for what it is worth, I think that the Content/Wyvern voicing is much more smoother and less brash than other digital organs and I certainly get hours of enjoyment from this organ. Indeed, I far prefer my Wyvern Sonata to the Allan Organ I sometimes play in our local church.


Regards

James

magnum opus
Feb-15-2009, 14:17
Thanks for the feedback.
We have a D6800 (a 3 man/ ped drawstop model, with a 4th 'solo' division which is a 'virtual' organ. There's no separate solo manual, but the stops of this division can be activated on I, II or III.

Ours is in a walnut (I think) cabinet. It matches well with the furniture in the sanctuary. The drawstops do not protrude out when pulled...they move very slightly and then settle in a 'mid-way' position and light up when activitated. They are not made in wood in this particular model.

Ntalikeris666
Mar-18-2009, 20:54
Thanks for the feedback.
We have a D6800 (a 3 man/ ped drawstop model, with a 4th 'solo' division which is a 'virtual' organ. There's no separate solo manual, but the stops of this division can be activated on I, II or III.

Ours is in a walnut (I think) cabinet. It matches well with the furniture in the sanctuary. The drawstops do not protrude out when pulled...they move very slightly and then settle in a 'mid-way' position and light up when activitated. They are not made in wood in this particular model.

Can you please tell me how the temperments sound?
Which ones do you use?
Also, how do the reed stops sound (trumpets , Bombardes, etc)

Ntalikeris666
Mar-18-2009, 20:55
I used to have the Content Organ Expander with 20 Stops which I used through my Yamaha Clavinova and found this to be a very good way of producing a classical pipe organ sound. It had one or two limitations and I was not overly fond of the Principal 8 voice as it was rather insipid for my taste.

When I upgraded to an organ a few years ago I settled on the Wyvern Sonata Mark 1V which has 31 stops based on an English Specification but built with Contents' technology. I far prefer the "English" voicing to the continental voicing. The Diapasons on both swell and great are good rounded diapason sounds and the Lieblich Gedekt 8 combines well with the Gamba 8 and Vox Celeste 8 to produce a lovely etheral string tone which is much smoother than could be produced on the EXL 220 with the Holz Flute8, Gamba 8 and Celeste 8. In fact I was surprized by how good and useful the Lieblich Gedekt 8 is. I had been prejudiced by past experience of this stop in a Father Willis Pipe Organ into thinking that this stop would be of little use. However in the Wyvern it is one of my favourite stops.

In my experience, for what it is worth, I think that the Content/Wyvern voicing is much more smoother and less brash than other digital organs and I certainly get hours of enjoyment from this organ. Indeed, I far prefer my Wyvern Sonata to the Allan Organ I sometimes play in our local church.


Regards

James


So, how would you compare a Content organ with a Johannus? Which do you think is better?

Regards,

Nicholas

Ntalikeris666
Mar-18-2009, 20:58
[/quote]

In my experience, for what it is worth, I think that the Content/Wyvern voicing is much more smoother and less brash than other digital organs and I certainly get hours of enjoyment from this organ. Indeed, I far prefer my Wyvern Sonata to the Allan Organ I sometimes play in our local church.


Regards

James

It seems that content is the same as wyner Right?

wljmrbill
Mar-19-2009, 04:31
Nicholas: I can only state factors regarding the Johannus. I had a 3 manual Church model to play as head-organist for a number of years that was installed in a large Episcopal Church bearing no expense with speakers and installation. I was very pleased with the performance and sounds created ( photo sounding technique) and I had the ability to adjust stops and sounds created with the instrument. I used the instrument for services as well as concert work with a very realistric pipe organ sound and tacker action. I preferred it to an Allen my self. Take Care and Enjoy... Bill

Ntalikeris666
Mar-19-2009, 15:21
Nicholas: I can only state factors regarding the Johannus. I had a 3 manual Church model to play as head-organist for a number of years that was installed in a large Episcopal Church bearing no expense with speakers and installation. I was very pleased with the performance and sounds created ( photo sounding technique) and I had the ability to adjust stops and sounds created with the instrument. I used the instrument for services as well as concert work with a very realistric pipe organ sound and tacker action. I preferred it to an Allen my self. Take Care and Enjoy... Bill


Bill: So, do you remember which johannus model were you playing on?
Have you played on other digital organs?

Clarion
Mar-20-2009, 19:05
It seems that Content is the same as Wyvern Right?
Nicholas

Absolutely not!!

I wasn't aware that Wyvern ever used Content technology; at least not for their higher end organs. Going back about a decade or so, they initially used Bradford Technology; but for the best part of a decade now, they have been using Phoenix Organ technology exclusively for their higher end instruments; and it doesn't get any better than that. Phoenix and Content, Johannus occupy absolute opposite ends of the quality-spectrum.

Phoenix probably offers more sound samples of their instruments than any other manufacturer:

http://www.phoenix-organs.co.uk/audio.html

Ntalikeris666
Mar-20-2009, 21:29
Absolutely not!!

I wasn't aware that Wyvern ever used Content technology; at least not for their higher end organs. Going back about a decade or so, they initially used Bradford Technology; but for the best part of a decade now, they have been using Phoenix Organ technology exclusively for their higher end instruments; and it doesn't get any better than that. Phoenix and Content, Johannus occupy absolute opposite ends of the quality-spectrum.

Phoenix probably offers more sound samples of their instruments than any other manufacturer:

http://www.phoenix-organs.co.uk/audio.html

Indeed Phoenix organs have a really nice sound.
If you had to rate these organs (sound quality)
which would you out in the first 2 places and why?
Johannus or Content?
I wont mention Phoenix because of the price difference.

Thanks for replying,
Best wishes

Nicholas

Clarion
Mar-20-2009, 22:06
Indeed Phoenix organs have a really nice sound. If you had to rate these organs (sound quality) which would you out in the first 2 places and why? Johannus or Content?

I wont mention Phoenix because of the price difference.
Nicholas

That gives rise to an interesting consideration: Which would offer the most rewarding experience? A lavishly appointed Johannus/Content with somewhat less than wonderful sound; or a modestly appointed Phoenix that simply melts you down from the inside out, each an every time you sit down to play it!?

Ntalikeris666
Mar-20-2009, 22:51
That gives rise to an interesting consideration: Which would offer the most rewarding experience? A lavishly appointed Johannus/Content with somewhat less than wonderful sound; or a modestly appointed Phoenix that simply melts you down from the inside out, each an every time you sit down to play it!?

Well, first of all i will have to mention that the cheapest Phoenix organ i have found was a 29 stops tab organ with 23.000$ (which was actually a special offer)... First of all, i live in Europe (Greece) so it is easier for me to visit a european factory like content or Johannus. Then, i dont want an instrument for recitals in the Concert hall, i want it mostly for practice (with the ability to experiment with the registration).
And actually, i really dont know, how much more a Phoenix organ will make me Melt from the inside out compared with a Content, or Johannus instrument. So apart from having the ultimate sound quality, you must also consider the value per Euro you get. For example, a 4 manual rodgers has 180.000 $. With 180.000 i can buy a really nice real pipe organ with 20 ranks that will surely melt my inside outs.
Thats why i only compare Johannus with Content. Even thing.
It is not fair to compare a Johannus with an Allen or Rodgers.
SO, having said that -without of course being sure to what i am finally going to do- i would like to ask you what you personally think about the sound quality between Content and JOhannus. What do you think are the dissadvantages and advantages of each one?
BTW i am visiting Holland at easter so i will have the chance to visit the content factory and inspect the models from upclose.
I am asking you to compare Content with Johannus because i might not have the chance to visit both factories, so that i could compare them myself.

Thanks, Nicholas

Clarion
Mar-21-2009, 02:32
without of course being sure to what i am finally going to do- i would like to ask you what you personally think about the sound quality between Content and JOhannus. What do you think are the dissadvantages and advantages of each one?

Place them both in a bag; give the bag a good shake; then dump them out. It won't matter which one comes out first. ;)

Ntalikeris666
Mar-21-2009, 14:54
Place them both in a bag; give the bag a good shake; then dump them out. It won't matter which one comes out first. ;)


Lol, i think i got it xD

jmcpher1
Mar-22-2009, 18:41
Wyvern organs at the top end of their range are indeed based on phoenix technology but at the bottom end I believe they use Content technology albeit using their own "English" samples.

Comparing Johannus with Content depends on your taste. Both are equally good at this price range. The Contents seem much smoother in tone than the Johannus and more suited to "romantic" temprement but the Johannus give good baroque tone.

You should try and buy the best you can afford and paying attention to the number of sound channels/amplifiers is as important as the quality of the samples used in the instrument. The more channels that the sound is spread over the more satisfying the end result will be.

Although I have a Wyvern Sonata I am particularly impressed with the Johannus new Vivaldi series which seems to have taken technology that bit further which might suggest that Johannus has got the edge at present in the technology war. No doubt Content will catch up soon.

Clarion
Mar-23-2009, 03:40
You should try and buy the best you can afford and paying attention to the number of sound channels/amplifiers is as important as the quality of the samples used in the instrument. The more channels that the sound is spread over the more satisfying the end result will be.

While the multi-channel stuff might aptly apply as a general principle for most church installations; it has little importance for a home organ installation.

I suspect that my Canadian Phoenix III/44 is probably a leading edge home installation. Instead of a whole bunch of channels to clutter our home; taking advantage of modern technology, this instrument utilizes a Lexicon 400 reverb and surround sound system. The front end employs a couple of corner-mounted stereo speakers, along with a couple powered sub-woofers that most ably take care of the bottom end. The rear of the room accomodates a couple of rear channel speakers which support the back end of the surround sound sytem.

I am fully satisfied with this setup.

wljmrbill
Mar-23-2009, 05:16
sorry do not remember model number was in 1981 if that helps. Yes I have played Allen, Rodgers and a pipe organ with digital "ranks "added to it ( strange but sounded very nice).....

Ntalikeris666
Mar-23-2009, 14:48
While the multi-channel stuff might aptly apply as a general principle for most church installations; it has little importance for a home organ installation.

I suspect that my Canadian Phoenix III/44 is probably a leading edge home installation. Instead of a whole bunch of channels to clutter our home; taking advantage of modern technology, this instrument utilizes a Lexicon 400 reverb and surround sound system. The front end employs a couple of corner-mounted stereo speakers, along with a couple powered sub-woofers that most ably take care of the bottom end. The rear of the room accomodates a couple of rear channel speakers which support the back end of the surround sound sytem.

I am fully satisfied with this setup.


How much did you get your phoenix organ?

Ntalikeris666
Mar-23-2009, 14:51
Wyvern organs at the top end of their range are indeed based on phoenix technology but at the bottom end I believe they use Content technology albeit using their own "English" samples.

Comparing Johannus with Content depends on your taste. Both are equally good at this price range. The Contents seem much smoother in tone than the Johannus and more suited to "romantic" temprement but the Johannus give good baroque tone.

You should try and buy the best you can afford and paying attention to the number of sound channels/amplifiers is as important as the quality of the samples used in the instrument. The more channels that the sound is spread over the more satisfying the end result will be.

Although I have a Wyvern Sonata I am particularly impressed with the Johannus new Vivaldi series which seems to have taken technology that bit further which might suggest that Johannus has got the edge at present in the technology war. No doubt Content will catch up soon.

Have you played on a vivaldi?

Ntalikeris666
Apr-13-2009, 16:53
While the multi-channel stuff might aptly apply as a general principle for most church installations; it has little importance for a home organ installation.

I suspect that my Canadian Phoenix III/44 is probably a leading edge home installation. Instead of a whole bunch of channels to clutter our home; taking advantage of modern technology, this instrument utilizes a Lexicon 400 reverb and surround sound system. The front end employs a couple of corner-mounted stereo speakers, along with a couple powered sub-woofers that most ably take care of the bottom end. The rear of the room accomodates a couple of rear channel speakers which support the back end of the surround sound sytem.

I am fully satisfied with this setup.


How much did you get your organ?

Clarion
Apr-14-2009, 00:28
How much did you get your organ?

Sorry Ntalikeris666;84876; but my lack of response to your question was intentional.

As someone living here in Ontario, Canada; located just an hour down the road from the impressive new Phoenix Canada manufacturing facility, I am not at all convinced that my experiences or prices incurred here in Canada would be in any way relevant to your European locus.

Regards
Claron

Ntalikeris666
Jun-01-2009, 21:40
Sorry Ntalikeris666;84876; but my lack of response to your question was intentional.

As someone living here in Ontario, Canada; located just an hour down the road from the impressive new Phoenix Canada manufacturing facility, I am not at all convinced that my experiences or prices incurred here in Canada would be in any way relevant to your European locus.

Regards
Claron

BTW i dont know if phoenix in Europe is the same as phoenix in Canada.
About the cases, surely its not. I dont know about the sound though. I contacted a dealer of Phoenix in the UK and the prices were quite good. For a 45 stop 2 manual organ they charged 15500 ~ Pounds (17900~ Euros, or 25400 $ ) without the installation and delivery.

By the way , i played on a content Mondri 5800 model (Their Highest end models) and the sound was pretty nice! The flues did not "scream" in the upper notes, mixtures were nice, and reeds were majestic. Also they seem to have implemented quite well the MAS (surround) technology. It is not the same as Johannus. I have played on both. Its far better (in my ear).
Generally, i think that content has more European sounding organs, whereas Phoenix are a bit more american (without saying in any way that they are bad) I am not a fanboy of neither of them , so please i would like to hear an undistorted opinion. BTW have you played on a content?
(a new one)

FelixLowe
Oct-28-2009, 05:27
Hello there,

Have you tried visiting the German page on Content organs, provided by a German shop? It provides a recital of organ works played on various models of the brand. The link is www.sakralorgelwelt.de/content/ (http://www.sakralorgelwelt.de/content/). There, find the button called Klangbeispiele on the left, and you will see a long playlist.

Generally speaking, from what I know, the company can offer different voicing, that is, English or Continental. However, their ordinary voicing in is in what organ literature would call the North German Baroque tradition to the degree of sounding like some Danish and certain other organs in Germany. In the past, there were ancient organs in Eastern Germany, that sounded similarly. For the pipe organ equivalent, the digital brand seems to emulate the Marcussen and Son's pipe organs produced in Denmark. The characteristics include forceful, articulate principals, and high-pitched mutations such as the 1' and 1 1/3' are made available for use. Also, the mixture and cymbel are unique, when compared to South German Baroque organs. Overall the voicing is lean and clear-cut, devoid of excessive fat lower harmonics.

I disagree with certain unfair comments I've read about the voicing. If you get a CD that features the old organs of Denmark, you will get general picture of the tonal quality which is extremely well emulated by Content. More often, we hear sounds produced by other digital organs in the South German tradition.

Someone had asked about a comparision between Content and Johannus. The latter featured a similar voicing more than 10 year's ago, but it seems to have altered its voicing in its more recent lines.

Also there are a few Content organ sound excerpts one can find on youtube.

Regards,
Felix

Ntalikeris666
Oct-28-2009, 19:47
Hello there,

Have you tried visiting the German page on Content organs, provided by a German shop? It provides a recital of organ works played on various models of the brand. The link is www.sakralorgelwelt.de/content/ (http://www.sakralorgelwelt.de/content/). There, find the button called Klangbeispiele on the left, and you will see a long playlist.

Generally speaking, from what I know, the company can offer different voicing, that is, English or Continental. However, their ordinary voicing in is in what organ literature would call the North German Baroque tradition to the degree of sounding like some Danish and certain other organs in Germany. In the past, there were ancient organs in Eastern Germany, that sounded similarly. For the pipe organ equivalent, the digital brand seems to emulate the Marcussen and Son's pipe organs produced in Denmark. The characteristics include forceful, articulate principals, and high-pitched mutations such as the 1' and 1 1/3' are made available for use. Also, the mixture and cymbel are unique, when compared to South German Baroque organs. Overall the voicing is lean and clear-cut, devoid of excessive fat lower harmonics.

I disagree with certain unfair comments I've read about the voicing. If you get a CD that features the old organs of Denmark, you will get general picture of the tonal quality which is extremely well emulated by Content. More often, we hear sounds produced by other digital organs in the South German tradition.

Someone had asked about a comparision between Content and Johannus. The latter featured a similar voicing more than 10 year's ago, but it seems to have altered its voicing in its more recent lines.

Also there are a few Content organ sound excerpts one can find on youtube.

Regards,
Felix

Check these out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CleDeNiCPS4&fmt=18
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azx1y62xmNc&fmt=18

Regards,
Nicholas

FelixLowe
Nov-05-2009, 07:10
Hello there,

Although the D4000 and D5000 of Content sound superb in the headphone, listening with the organ's inbuilt or professional loudspeakers mounted on the wall may well be a different matter. However, I suspect the Mondri series is a better solution as it has 18 speakers in it. In fact, whenver budget permits, the number of speakers, in my view, should be doubled. 36 speakers, and at least two subwoofers. And more stops can be added in a custom Mondri, I guess. The reason I say this is because it seems that a few excepts on youtube featuring a Dutch guy playing his resident Content organ has pretty realistic sound projection, even though the quality of recording of those excepts are not first-class. So the trick really is the number of speakers, aside from the sampling technology. Please view this video clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVgpzh3rXuM&feature=related. However, the Mixture heard in verse 2 of this clip is rather insipid: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m5u-ykr6WPo. I don't know if it is because of the quality of the recording or the character of the Mixture itself.

But by enlarge the number of speakers is almost a decisive factor in creating more realistic organ sound production.

Felix