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    Frederik Magle
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Bach Chorales in PDF

NEB

New member
Hi CT64,

Just a question for you. BWV621 'Da Jesus an dem Kreuze stund' you've noted a metronome marking of Crotchet = 52.

Curious because I always use this on Good Friday and always play it about half that tempo on something like a 8' violin diapason or similar. I think it has a wonderful tension to it that conveys the intense sadness associated with the crucifixion.

So, I'm curious what others do with this one???????????????

This question is not solely directed at CT64. Thanks for responses.
 

Krummhorn

Administrator
Staff member
Hi NEB,

I've always played it at 52 on the quaver - that tempo on the crotchet is too 'irreverant' for the mood of this piece. My registration is 8' Sptizflote, 8' Gemshorn & 1-1/3 Larigot for the manual, and a light 8 & 4 in the pedal.
 

NEB

New member
Hi NEB,

I've always played it at 52 on the quaver - that tempo on the crotchet is too 'irreverant' for the mood of this piece. My registration is 8' Sptizflote, 8' Gemshorn & 1-1/3 Larigot for the manual, and a light 8 & 4 in the pedal.

Thanks Krummhorn. I agree - 52 on the quaver is perfect for the mood and tension. I'll give your registration a wirl on it when I next go in for a practice sess.

I've always left the upperwork off, getting back to a soft diapason type illustrating the pathos of the moment. But I'll give that a go.
 

Contratrombone64

Admiral of Fugues
Tempo indications are a guide only and I "got at them" by adopting Helmut Walcha, Knud Vad and George Ritchie's tempi (listened to differnt player's interpretations). I may very well have gotten that tempo completely wrong. I'll check that and fix it if needed. I appreciate all feedback on this.

As to registration, trumpet en chamade in the right hand, 8' bombarde in the left and 64' contratrombone in the pedal is particuarly soothing for the congregation (ducks for cover)
 
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Krummhorn

Administrator
Staff member
Welcome, NEB ...

As for the upperwork registration, my Larigot is 'wired' off the Gemshorn rank, so it is rather subtle and never overpowers. Sometimes I have to add more stops to pieces like this so that the organ is heard over the din of the congregation during the prelude.

CT64 ... nice registration ... you'll no doubt want to consider adding the tremolo to 8' Bomb ... :nut:
 

NEB

New member
As for the upperwork registration, my Larigot is 'wired' off the Gemshorn rank, so it is rather subtle and never overpowers.

ah. Mine isn't that subtle but I'll play around. always willing to adapt and make improvements...



Sometimes I have to add more stops to pieces like this so that the organ is heard over the din of the congregation during the prelude.

Thankfully I really don't have that problem. The regular congregation are always very respectful of quiet contemplation prior to services, and any visitors are encouraged to keep quiet with carefully placed Shushing to remind them to put a sock in it. And if they really get too noisy the main priest asks for quiet to be observed in respect to our Lord. Usually does the trick.
 

NEB

New member
Ct64,

Goodness I've just thought - I hope you don't think it was a criticism I was levelling in what I said...... Perish the thought...
 

NEB

New member
Enlightened? me? now there's one for the jokes thread.

I'm the original accidental organist. (pun intended)
 

NEB

New member
I guess you're right - I never set out to be an organist, but just always happened to be the one that ended up doing the job...
 

Contratrombone64

Admiral of Fugues
I just had lunch with two amusing expat Americans today (true story this). Mag told me about her childhood in Richmond, Virginia when they were at the local Presbyterian church. There was an upstairs and downstairs section, the upstairs was used historically for slaves and maids, the downstairs for white Americans (just setting the scene). Anyways, at the time Meg's story happened the church was most definitely not segregated.

There were three familys' children in the upper section, mostly behaving themselves and it all came to a sudden end when one of the kids decided to make a paper aeroplane (airplane) and launched it. It (apparently) flew beautifully across the church, then circled around the clergyman's head (out of his sight and to the amazement of the congregation) picking up speed and crash landed in his earhole during his sermon.

I laughed, and laughed. Being a clergyman's son myself I could share some horror stories of misbehaviour in church.
 
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Krummhorn

Administrator
Staff member
Adding a tremulant to a Bombarde stop is a wonderful idea.

I heard an organist once do this in a church service ... it was a digital organ with theatrical trems installed - all 16' stops went through the 'flute' channel, which included the Swell 16' Reed. The organist threw on the theatrical trems and played a solo below middle C on this 16' reed ... rather sounded like a walrus being given an enema ... I couldn't contain myself and busted up laughing and got some provocative stares from the other parishioners. It was a weird church, fortunately in another state from which I resided. :rolleyes:
 

Corno Dolce

Admiral Honkenwheezenpooferspieler
Hey Krummhorn,

*Walrus being given an enema* :D:D:D:D:D:D:D Oh thats just too funny - GAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH - HAHAHAHAHAHAHA :):):):):):):)

Thats better than the "pachydermal flatulence" that someone shared once.

Cheers,

Corno Dolce
 

Contratrombone64

Admiral of Fugues
Serassi1836 ... there is still a small amout to do and this bracket is complete. Watch this spot, I'm so friggin busy with my real job at Present I've not had a chance to scratch myself let alone do something pleasureable like type-set the Great Bach.
 

greatcyber

New member
In Agreement

Thanks for this idea but I need to wait a while before I can print any
of those pieces. They do look appetizing for an amature like me.
judy tooley

I'm with you, Judy. Especially since I've been away from playing for almost 4 decades. But the rusty memory is slowly connecting to the synapses and the fingers are starting to remember...pleasantly surprising when I hear something on the radio and then go to my keyboard and I can play some or most of it.

My first organ lesson I learned "Lady of Spain" and "Alley Cat" and then we found a teacher who was a classical organist. He thought that since I liked classical then that is what I should be learning. He gave me my first booklet, "Easy Bach" (which I scratched out immediately and wrote "Hard Bach") but it was the 10 Little Preludes and Fugues. Right now, those are what I am trying hardest to remember. I figure that once I have those down I can graduate again and start anew. I have to admit that my sight reading isn't what it used to be. But, in time...

Stephen
 
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